SENATE COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES, AGRICULTURE, SALMON AND WATER

 

 

March 05, 2001   Hearing Room B

8:00 a.m.  Tapes 48 - 50

 

MEMBERS PRESENT:            Sen. Ken Messerle, Chair

Sen. Frank Shields, Vice-Chair

Sen. Jason Atkinson

Sen. Roger Beyer

Sen. Ginny Burdick

Sen. Ryan Deckert

Sen. Bill Fisher

 

MEMBER EXCUSED:

 

STAFF PRESENT:                  Jennifer Solomon, Committee Administrator

Cheryl Young, Committee Assistant

 

 

MEASURE/ISSUES HEARD:            SB 41, Public Hearing

SB 931, Public Hearing

 

 

These minutes are in compliance with Senate and House Rules.  Only text enclosed in quotation marks reports a speaker’s exact words.  For complete contents, please refer to the tapes.

 

TAPE/#

Speaker

Comments

TAPE 48Tape, A

005

Chair Messerle

Opens Meeting. Opens Public Hearing on SB 41 and SB 931 at 8:05

SB 41 AND SB 931, PUBLIC HEARING

011

Staff

Summarizes SB 41 and SB 931

023

Mary O’Brien

Botanist of canyon land NE Oregon. Testifies in opposition of SB 41 and SB 931.  Submits written testimony.  (EXHIBIT A).

071

Sen. Shields

Questions transmission of Chronic Wasting Disease to humans.

073

O’Brien

Responds that it will take years before it is known if CWD can jump to humans.

084

Sen. Shields

States that he has heard of people who have eaten elk meat with CWD. Asks how long ago this happened.

088

O’Brien

Responds that she does not know, and expands on answer.

107

Al Elkins

Representing the Oregon Hunters Association. Speaks in opposition of SB 41 and SB 931. Defers to Dr. Cook. Submits written testimony. (EXHIBIT B).

116

Walter Cook

Veterinarian with Wyoming Game and Fish Department. Discusses Chronic Wasting Disease and other diseases and how it’s spread. Dr. Cook narrated a slide presentation. States that they are involved in research and education.

398

Chair Messerle

Asks if CWD can be managed in domestic herds through surveillance and between states.

403

Cook

Responds that the USDA is developing a certification program.

429

Chair Messerle

Asks for a prognosis for the three states that are showing signs of CWD now to keep it from spreading amongst the wild herds.

433

Cook

States that it appears the disease is spreading slowly.

443

Sen. Burdick

Asks if research has found a way to destroy prions.

445

Cook

Responds that they have found that strong concentrations of some chemicals seem to work.

454

Sen. Burdick

Asks for clarification on types of destruction of this disease.

458

Cook

Responds.

463

Sen. Beyer

Asks if this disease occurs naturally in the wild or was it introduced at some point.

466

Cook

States that it was first noticed within captive populations.

477

Sen. Beyer

Asks if CWD affects other cervid’s such as reindeer, caribou or moose.

480

Cook

States that it is limited to deer and elk.

490

Sen. Beyer

Asks if the buck shown in the slide was wild or captive.

492

Cook

Responds that it was a captive animal.

496

Sen. Shields

Asks if either Wyoming or Colorado will be willing to make a recommendation to the committee as they are considering this issue in Oregon.

510

Cook

States that his advice is to prevent the disease from getting into Oregon.

Tape 49, A

047

Sen. Shields

Asks what keeps it (CWD) from moving faster?

050

Walter Cook

Responds that it is a slow moving disease.

059

Chair Messerle

Asks what his recommendation would be on bringing trophy deer back, or the spreading of the disease by wildlife into our state. Asks if there is a chance of that happening and if there is anything we can do to prevent it.

066

Cook

Responds that yes it is possible. Expands on answer.

076

Sen. Fisher

Asks how long they’ve known about the disease.

077

Cook

Responds they first starting noticing it in their captive population in 1967.

082

Sen. Fisher

Asks how that relates to elk farming.

083

Cook

States that the first documentation was in the Colorado wildlife research facilities.

088

Sen. Fisher

States that he indicated that the wildlife got it from the elk ranches.

092

Cook

Replies and clarifies.

097

Sen. Fisher

Asks how it would have started in their research facilities if it wasn’t in the wild population.

099

Cook

States his hypothesis.

113

Sen. Beyer

Asks how large the facilities were when it was first discovered.

117

Cook

Responds that in Wyoming it is a few hundred acres. The main body of research occurs within a 20-acre area.

124

Sen. Beyer

Asks how many animals are kept in this tight enclosure.

126

Cook

Responds.

130

Sen. Beyer

Asks if there are deer or elk ranches or farms in that area that have the identified disease.

132

Cook

Responds not in Colorado.

150

Steven Kafoury

Representing the Wildlife Society. Speaks in opposition of SB 41 and SB 931.

162

Warren Aney

Representing the Oregon Chapter of Wildlife Society. States some concerns regarding these bills. Speaks in opposition of SB 41 and SB 931.Submits written testimony.  (EXHIBIT C).

249

Sen. Burdick

Asks if hoof and mouth disease would affect elk and deer.

251

Aney

Responds.

260

Bob Davison

NW Field Representative for the Wildlife Management Institute. Testifies in opposition to both pieces of legislation.  Submits written testimony. (EXHIBIT D).

347

Chair Messerle

States that he is becoming convinced this is a very serious disease, and that we are not doing enough in the wildlife management to control the disease. States he is also concerned about domestic herds and how they are managed and is even more concerned about the management of our wild herds. Asks Mr. Davison if he has any suggestions to add to his testimony in that regard.

365

Davison.

Agrees that it is a concern.

367

Sen. Shields

Asks if any study has been done that shows the percentage of total population with CWD in the wild herds, vs. the percentage within domesticated herds.

378

Davison

Responds.

383

Chair Messerle

States that the herds identified with the disease have been destroyed.

399

Dr. Sharon Methvin

Representing the Animal Protection Institute, is a biocultural anthropologist. Addresses the social and cultural implications and speaks in opposition to both bills. Submits written testimony. (EXHIBIT E).

Tape 48, B

048

Chuck Woosley

Executive Committee of the Oregon Division of the Izaak Walton League of Oregon. Speaks in opposition of SB 41 and SB 931.  Submits written testimony. (EXHIBIT F).

137

Dr. Larry Peetz

An Oregon Veterinarian. States he has great apprehension of the expanding of the elk farming industry in Oregon. Feels the program should remain under ODFW. Asks the committee not to support the bills. Submits written testimony. (EXHIBITS G AND H).

212

Aney

Asks that the bills not be moved forward.

221

Todd Bastian

Oregon Regional Director for the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.  Speaks in opposition of these bills.

232

Col. Julian McFadden.

Citizen. Testifies in opposition of these bills.

386

Rod Harder

Executive Director of the Oregon Sportsman’s Defense Fund.  Testifies in opposition of bills. Submits written testimony. (EXHIBIT I).

475

Phil Donovan

On behalf of the Oregon Guides and Packers Association. Speaks in opposition of bills. Submits written testimony. (EXHIBIT J).

516

Jim Workman

Outfitter from Northeastern Oregon representing Oregon Guides and Packers Association. Speaks in opposition of both bills.

Tape 49, B

038

Jim Workman

Continues testimony.

078

Chair Messerle

Makes a challenge to both sport groups as well as the ODFW that we need to do more at those levels, such as transferring harvested animals across line, etc. We need to be very careful that we are doing all we can to prevent the spread of this disease. This is an issue we should be taking a hard look at to be responsible as well.

088

Sen. Shields

Asks if someone can give him a comparison of the size of the two economies in this potential economic argument.

101

Workman

Responds to question.

111

Harder

Makes comments regarding the million-dollar figure, and hopes to have more fiscal data in the near future.

121

Phil

Comments further on the million-dollar figure.

141

Sen. Ferrioli

Representing District 28. Speaks in favor of SB 931. States that recently there has been a steep reluctance on the part of ODFW to accept the concept of elk ranching. States there needs to be an interactive management strategy brought to bear on elk ranching. He believes the Oregon Department of Agriculture is the right agency to do that since they are responsible for managing animal husbandry and confined animal feeding operations and other agricultural operations in Oregon. Supports both bills.

213

Michelle Blake

Speaks on economic opportunities. Speaks of possible risks to the public and farmers. Opposes both bills. Submits written testimony. (EXHIBIT K).

241

Roger Huffman

Administrator of the Animal Health and Identification Division of the Department of Agriculture. Speaks of some issues in SB 931. Asks for some issues to be clarified and specified.

277

Dr. Andrew Clark

State Veterinarian of the Department of Agriculture. Clarifies Hoof & Mouth disease for the committee. Submits written testimony. (EXHIBIT L).

284

Sen. Shields

Asks if there has been a study done about how fast CWD moves in wild population vs. farmed population.


 

290

Clark

Responds that he is not an expert on CWD and expands on answer.

301

Sen. Shields

Asks if this disease seems to move more from farm to farm, or does it seem to move more in a wild population. Asks if there is a differential.

311

Clark

Clarifies.

328

Sen. Burdick

Asks Dr. Clark if he concurs with Dr. Cook’s assessment regarding the length of time prions stay in an area, and what implications that would have if an elk farm suffered from that and it was useless for livestock and cervids.

342

Clark

States that prion is very resistant. Expands on response.

365

Sen. Burdick

Asks Dr. Clark if, as a veterinarian, he would recommend they put other livestock on that land, or consider that too risky.

371

Clark

Stated that he would consult with others, but it would be something that would be given a great deal of consideration.

384

Sen. Burdick

Asks if there was a contaminated farm and all the elk were destroyed and cattle were moved onto that farm, does he think that there would be an undermining of consumer confidence in the beef supply.

395

Clark

Responds.

419

Lois Jordan

Citizen. Testifies in support of both bills.

450

John Mullins

Citizen. Speaks on behalf of himself and his wife Robin. Testifies in support domestic elk farms.

491

Sheldon Kirk

Citizen. Testifies in support of bills. Speaks of concerns of disease and escapes.

Tape 50, A

051

Stan Hermens

Citizen. Speaks in favor of both bills. 

092

Sen. Shields

Asks about money spent since he got his permit.

093

Hermens

Responds.

114

Sen. Shields

Asks where this ranch is located.

115

Hermens

Responds.

126

Richard Patterson

Testifies in support of bills.  Submits videotape.  (EXHIBIT M).

146

Steve Simpson

Citizen. Speaks in favor of both bills.

174

Patterson

Talks about herd in South Dakota was put down due to CWD, and how other breeders are donating elk to put on this farm.

180

Chair Messerle

States for the record, those people who signed up to speak in favor of elk farming: Harold Amidon, Ed Powers, Jim Wagner, Carl Lindquist, George Esler, Katie Cate of the Oregon Cattlemen’s Association, Lonnie Woosley.

193

Sen. Shields

Asks Dr. Cook if they have learned anything of the nature of the disease just by its movement from state facility to state facility, or from farm to farm or by its movement itself.

208

Dr. Cook

Responds and clarifies.

216

Sen. Shields

Asks if its potential moved from the facility to the farms.

218

Cook

Responds that no one knows for sure. Expands on response.

230

Sen. Shields

Asks if there is any evidence that it moves more decisively from farm to farm, or does it move just as rapidly in the wild, and does the concentration factor make a difference.

237

Cook

States that there has been no research studies on that at this point. Expands on explanation.

260

Sen. Shields

Having studied the disease and knowing it’s a brain stem diagnosis, any educated guesses as to how far we might be from a test to be given on live animals.

268

Cook

Responds.

286

Sen. Fisher

Asks if there is any history of ranch animals being in contact with wild animals.

298

Cook

States not that he is aware of.

310

Chair Messerle

Submitted testimony to be put on record.  (EXHIBITS N through U).  Adjourns meeting 10:13 a.m.

 

Submitted By,                        Reviewed By,

 

 

 

Cheryl Young,                        Jennifer Solomon,

Committee Assistant                        Administrator

 

EXHIBIT SUMMARY

 

A – SB 41, written testimony, Mary O’Brien, 2pp.

B – SB 41 and SB 931, written testimony, Al Elkins, 1p.

C – SB 41 and SB 931, written testimony, Warren Aney, 2pp.

D – SB 41, written testimony, Robert Davison, 2pp.

E – SB 41, written testimony, Dr. Sharon Methvin, 2pp.

F – SB 41, written testimony, Chuck Woosley, 3pp.

G – SB 41 and SB 931, written testimony, Dr. Larry Peetz, 5pp.

H – SB 41, written testimony, Dr. Michael W. Miller, 5pp.

I – SB 41, written testimony, Rod Harder, 2pp.

J – SB 41, written testimony, Phil Donovan, 1p.

K – SB 41, written testimony, Michelle Blake, 1p.

L – SB 931, written testimony, Dr. Andrew Clark, 1p.

M – SB 41 and SB 931, video tape, Richard & Linda Patterson

N – SB 41, written testimony, Geoff Latham, 2pp.

O – SB 41, written testimony, Harold Amidon, 14pp.

P – SB 41, written testimony, Kathleen Kidwell, 3pp.

Q – SB 41 and SB 931, written testimony, Richard Furrer, 1p.

R – SB 41 and SB 931, written testimony, Merle Kidwell, 2pp.

S – SB 931, written testimony, Kathleen Kidwell, 1p.

T – SB 41, written testimony, John Mullins, 1p.

U – SB 41, written testimony, George & Jan Elser, 1p.

V – SB 41 and SB 931, written testimony,  Merle Kidwell, 1p.