HOUSE COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION

 

 

February 03, 2003   Hearing Room E

1:00 PM Tapes  15 - 16

 

MEMBERS PRESENT:            Rep. Vic Backlund, Chair

Rep. Pat Farr, Vice-Chair

Rep. Elaine Hopson, Vice-Chair

Rep. Brad Avakian

Rep. Billy Dalto

Rep. Mary Nolan

Rep. Wayne Scott

 

STAFF PRESENT:                  Jim Keller, Committee Administrator

Jeana Harrington, Committee Assistant

 

MEASURE/ISSUES HEARD:            -Introduction of Committee Measures

-Informational Meeting – Invited Testimony on Certificate of Initial Mastery (CIM) and Certificate of Advanced Mastery (CAM).

 

These minutes are in compliance with Senate and House Rules.  Only text enclosed in quotation marks reports a speaker’s exact words.  For complete contents, please refer to the tapes.

 

TAPE/#

Speaker

Comments

TAPE 15, A

004

Chair Backlund

Calls meeting to order at 1:07 PM. Welcomes colleagues and audience. Opens work session on LC Draft 2047 (EXHIBIT A).

WORK SESSION ON COMMITTEE MEASURES

015

Rep. Hopson

MOTION:  Moves LC 2047 BE INTRODUCED as a committee bill.

018

 

VOTE:  6-0-1

EXCUSED:  1 - Nolan

 

Chair Backlund

Hearing no objection, declares the motion CARRIED.

030

Chair Backlund

Closes work session on LC Draft 2047 and opens informational meeting on the Certificate of Initial Mastery (CIM) and Certificate of Advanced Mastery (CAM).

INFORMATIONAL MEETING

034

Robert Saunders

Coordinator, Kalapuga High School. Provides history in education.

047

Jim Jamieson

Willamette High School. Provides stance on the CIM/CAM. States the high school diploma is not a high enough requirement. Lists the merits of the CIM/CAM. Lists difficulties with the CIM/CAM.

114

Rep. Hopson

Asks if they are suggesting that the CIM be optional.

125

Jamieson

Answers that it is, in effect, optional.

136

Rep. Hopson

Inquires how society at large can be shown the importance of the CIM/CAM.

141

Saunders

Explains there has to be an incentive and a standard. Provides examples for employing this.

157

Rep. Dalto

Comments on the CAM as an accountability tool.

166

Jamieson

Explains the intent of his remark with regard to the CAM as an accountability tool.

187

Rep. Dalto

Asks why a CAM is required.

189

Jamieson

Responds to this.

191

Rep. Farr

Observes that business leaders do not fully understand the purpose of the CIM.

199

Saunders

Concurs they receive either no or mixed information on the CIM.

211

Rep. Farr

Assumes there is an actual certificate for CIM passage. Asks what is included on the certificate.

212

Jamieson

Replies that it lists the standards they have shown they can perform.

220

Rep. Farr

Asks if they believe that information on the certificate garners a positive response.

225

Jamieson

Answers that it is probably too brief to accommodate that currently.

232

Rep. Avakian

Comments on the value of the CIM/CAM with regard to the workforce.

249

Saunders

Responds to this concerning advanced degrees and the workplace. Offers that a CIM/CAM may be a point of pride.

270

Jamieson

Agrees that not all students attend college, but those who do not perform services we all enjoy. Believes the CIM helps them to achieve learning . 

293

Chair Backlund

Comments on the modification and or elimination of the CIM/CAM. Asks for their input in this.

301

Jamieson

Responds concerning high school diplomas and the CIM. Voices concern about the complexity of the program.

318

Saunders

Remarks about the ‘spirit’ of the CIM. States that he would like to see a link between the diploma and the CIM.

337

Chair Backlund

Comments on the linkage of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) and CIM. Asks for their input into this.

342

Jamieson

Believes this could be a positive addition. Voices concern with workload for teachers and students.

356

Rep. Avakian

Asks how they would accommodate advanced learning in terms of performance arts.

360

Jamieson

Responds that this with regard to focus and specialization in the CAM.

373

Rep. Nolan

Understands that NCLB requires states to have standards, but does not dictate what those are. Asks if he thinks they should modify CIM/CAM, or start over.

383

Jamieson

Recommends that modification be the direction of CIM/CAM.

389

Rep. Dalto

Refers to (EXHIBIT B) regarding percentage of student receiving a CIM. Asks what that percentage is.

393

Saunders

States he estimates it began at around 20% of sophomores. Adds they would ideally like for 85-90% of students to receive a CIM.

398

Rep. Dalto

Remarks on this percentage.

399

Jamieson

Offers that this represents the students who are not conditioned to the system.  

TAPE 16,A

006

Rep. Dalto

Poses question regarding the  number of teachers and personnel working with students on the CIM.

008

Jamieson

Responds that every teacher does by either working with student sor working as a portfolio manager.

010

Saunders

Adds that every adult including administrator is involved.

013

Rep. Dalto

Requests an estimate of the amount of time spent per day focusing on CIM management.

016

Jamieson

Responds that every five to six weeks time is allotted for the CIM. States that this is contingent upon the time of year and on the subject studied.

021

Rep. Dalto

Remarks that few actually attain the certificate despite the number of students involved in the program and time teacher’s spend on the CIM.

029

Jamieson

Clarifies an earlier point. Adds that other classroom educational tasks and the CIM are interrelated.

035

Rep. Dalto

Voices concerns as to the overall operation of the CIM and its recipients.

040

Rep. Farr

Remarks that his son did not receive a CIM although he was considered to be a high achiever. Clarifies an earlier discussed point about simplification of the CIM and CAM.  

052

Rep. Hopson

Requests summary of the measurements of a diploma and of a CIM

056

Saunders

Replies that a student can perform at a 60% level and receive a high school diploma. States a CIM level of mastery would be around 80%.  Points out students will continue to opt-out altogether if that is left a choice.

073

Chair Backlund

Thanks them.

080

Clark Brody

Former Deputy Superintendent, Oregon Department of Education (ODE). Refers to (EXHIBIT C).  Overviews cornerstones for success in the Oregon education system.

223

Brody

Explains what constitutes a high school diploma. Describes the relationship between the high school diploma and the CIM/CAM. Defines the CIM. Gives examples of the benefits of this assessment.

308

Brody

Defines the CAM and details its purpose. Remarks on their importance.

361

Rep. Farr

Asks about our ability to assess these students.

370

Brody

Responds with regard to NCLB.

395

Rep. Dalto

Requests whether data is available concerning ethnicity and demographics and CIM recipients.

402

Brody

Answers that presently they only have school-level data in those areas.  Comment on the implementation of an ODE database with this type of information. Provides that they are able to deduce who is and who is not learning because of the CIM.

TAPE 15,B

003

Brody

Continues answer. Explains that funding is needed for the database.

012

Rep. Dalto

Clarifies if any data concerning demographics or ethnicity is available.

014

Brody

Answers that data of that nature is only available on a school-level.

017

Chair Backlund

Asks what his views on modification of CIM and CAM are.

020

Brody

Comments on modification relating to NCLB. Remarks on complexity of the CIM/CAM. Suggests that simplification could warrant some benefit. Reiterates that the cornerstones named earlier are essential.

043

Chair Backlund

Thanks him.

049

Diane McKillop

Salem-Keizer teacher. Provides history in education. Describes school experience for students prior to education reform. Explains the scoring guide for writing (EXHIBIT D). Comments on scoring guides in general. Remarks on teacher workshops. Discusses student preparation. Voices concern in terms of NCLB requirements. Points out the work that has already been done in terms of standards. Voices frustration about the constant evolution of CAM.        

260

Rep. Hopson

Comments on the relevance of her testimony. Asks if teachers have had difficulty with the assessments.

265

McKillop

Responds about the burdens of the assessments with regard to time.

283

Rep. Dalto

States he appreciated her testimony. Asks where she teaches.

285

McKillop

Answers McNary High School.

286

Rep. Dalto

Clarifies that she taught untracked students. Asks if she had difficulty getting students to submit work. Offers observations on this.

312

McKillop

Responds there are requirements and acknowledges that it is difficult to get some students to produce work. 

334

Chair Backlund

Asks about fellow teachers’ attitudes towards the CIM.

337

McKillop

Answers that opinions are varied with regard to subject.

365

Rep. Avakian

States he is curious as to unfunded areas of CIM/CAM and the difference that would have been made if they had been funded.

372

McKillop

Lists organization with regard to testing as a burden. Adds additional money could go to train teachers and to involve additional staff.

TAPE 16,B

003

McKillop

Continues. Adds portfolios, though not required, are relevant and add to the workload.

010

Chair Backlund

Speaks about his relationship with Diane and thanks her.

040

Kate Dixon

Retired educator and ODE employee. Puts school reform in historical context. Points out the historical education events that led to the CIM and CAM. Acknowledges the weaknesses and struggles with implementing CIM/CAM. Discusses the amount of time and energy spent to create higher standards. States that Oregon can be proud of its efforts and needs to build on what was important in the past.

151

Chair Backlund

Thanks her. Closes informational meeting. Adjourns meeting at 2:42 PM.

 

EXHIBIT SUMMARY

 

A – LC Draft 2047, Staff, 2 p

B – Informational, CIM Recognition, Jim Jameson, 2 p

C – Informational, School Reform in Oregon, Clark Brody, 2 p

D – Informational, Student Scoring Guide: Writing, Diane McKillop, 7 p