HOUSE COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION

 

 

February 07, 2003   Hearing Room E

1:00 PM Tapes  19 - 20

 

MEMBERS PRESENT:            Rep. Vic Backlund, Chair

Rep. Pat Farr, Vice-Chair

Rep. Elaine Hopson, Vice-Chair

Rep. Brad Avakian

Rep. Billy Dalto

Rep. Mary Nolan

 

MEMBER EXCUSED:             Rep. Wayne Scott

 

STAFF PRESENT:                  Jim Keller, Committee Administrator

Jeana Harrington, Committee Assistant

 

 

MEASURE HEARD:                     HB 2371– Public Hearing

 

These minutes are in compliance with Senate and House Rules.  Only text enclosed in quotation marks reports a speaker’s exact words.  For complete contents, please refer to the tapes.

 

TAPE/#

Speaker

Comments

TAPE 19, A

004

Chair Backlund

Calls meeting to order at 1:04 PM. Welcomes colleagues and audience. Opens public hearing on HB 2371.

HB 2371 PUBLIC HEARING

012

Jim Keller

Reads Staff Measure Summary (SMS) on HB 2371.

016

Rep. Tootie Smith

House District 18. Testifies in favor of HB 2371. Explains her reasons for authoring the bill. Describes student portfolios. Details the workload that portfolios create for teachers. Believes student portfolios are a mandate.         

066

Rep. Hopson

Asks whether a difference is made if the portfolio is left optional instead of eliminated.

068

Rep. Smith

Believes there is a difference.

077

Rep. Hopson

Adds to previous question.

082

Rep. Smith

Responds the new program would allow for less of a burden as she sees it is a mandate.

088

Chair Backlund

Suspects that they would find ways to reduce burden for teachers. Wonders what the effects of eliminating portfolios would be.

094

Rep. Smith

Responds. States she also has a bill to eliminate the Certificate of Initial Mastery (CIM) and the Certificate of Advanced Mastery (CAM) altogether, although she does agree with parts of it. Lists the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) as an area of conflict.

112

Rep. Farr

Clarifies that schools can continue to use portfolios despite passage of HB 2371. 

126

Rep. Smith

Replies that schools can continue to collect work samples. Voices concern about the mandated requirements and the ‘burdensome paperwork’.

140

Rep. Farr

Asks about language changes the bill makes with regard to the expectations of portfolios in schools.  

150

Rep. Smith

Explains it depends whether this is viewed as an option or a mandate, and that this is the issue. Adds that work samples can be obtained, not prohibited by the statute.

159

Rep. Farr

Comments on this.

172

Rep. Smith

Closes. Relates the portfolio issue to overall education spending. Comments that this is an easy fix compared to other educational dilemmas.

185

Dr. Jerry Wilson

Superintendent, Hermiston School District. Testifies in opposition of HB 2371.  Supports retention of portfolios and provides copy of his doctoral thesis on writing portfolios (EXHIBIT A).

235

Rep. Dalto

Asks if his thesis discusses portfolios with regard to higher education and the college application process.

242

Wilson

Responds that the portfolio is part of developing the abilities used in higher education.

247

Rep. Farr

Requests the size of the Hermiston school district.

249

Wilson

Responds concerning the size of the district.

253

Rep. Farr

Asks what resources are necessary to maintain the program.

255

Wilson

Answers $28,000-$30,000 for the district. Implies that the writing portfolio represents a best practice, but may not be so for other subjects.

287

Rep. Dalto

Inquires if teachers are receptive of portfolios.

290

Wilson

Responds there is no prevalent opposition, though portfolios require a different type of work. Points out technological evolution will reduce paperwork and overall workload.

303

Rep. Dalto

Asks how teachers collaborate on portfolios.  

306

Wilson

Informs of the training for teachers.

310

Rep. Dalto

Requests what the feedback from teachers was.

312

Wilson

Indicates the response was more training was needed.

333

Michael Mann

Teacher, Gresham Barlow School District. Testifies in favor of HB 2371 (EXHIBIT B).  Explains his issues as an educator with the opposition of CIM/CAM and related portfolios.   

TAPE 20, A

002

Mann

Continues testimony. Describes student portfolios and their value. Believes elimination of portfolios leaves an incomplete student assessment. 

035

Rep. Dalto

Asks how much time he allots to portfolios.

038

Mann

Sees collecting work samples as essential to his job. Adds he would continue the practice whether or not required.

045

Rep. Dalto

Inquires as to where he does work related to portfolios.

047

Mann

Answers that most work is completed during the workday, although he does spend some time on them at home.

049

Rep. Dalto

Inquires what amount of class time is spent on portfolios.

051

Mann

Estimates that students and teachers need to collaborate in the classroom around 3-4 hours during the year.

056

Rep. Avakian

Gathers this method is valuable. Refers to current proposed bill. Asks if elimination of portfolios would make a difference to him.

063

Mann

Provides that if they were not initially required, he would not have begun the practice. Adds that he now believes it is the best practice.

067

Rep. Farr

Clarifies that portfolios were required by the school district.

068

Mann

Answers teachers are required to keep a record of work-sample scores.

071

Rep. Farr

Inquires what happens to portfolios upon graduation.

074

Mann

Answers that middle school portfolios go home with students when they move on. Adds the high school has stated they do not want the portfolios, but they do take the scorecards.

089

Rep. Farr

Remarks that it seems practices are different by school or by district.

092

Katie Wich

Student, Gresham Barlow School District. Testifies in favor of portfolios and their importance in the continuing success of students in terms of work ethic and improvement.

106

Chair Backlund

Asks what views their classmates have on portfolios.

110

Kelsie Blachly

Student, Gresham Barlow School District. Answers that portfolios enable them to see their improvement throughout the years.

113

Rep. Nolan

Observes that their presence alone demonstrates the importance of public speaking, and additionally, bodes well on their teaching.

121

Dave Guile

Testifies on HB 2371. Explains the current statute requirements. Voices concern that use or lack of portfolios results in lack of congruency statewide. States requirements of portfolios are ambiguous. Requests mandates be congruent.

188

Chair Backlund

Comments on his acquaintance with Mr. Guile.

195

Bill Auty

Associate Superintendent, Office of Evaluation and Assessment, Oregon Department of Education (ODE). Testifies about portfolios (EXHIBIT C).

228

Chair Backlund

Poses question regarding the relationship between portfolio standards and others.

231

Auty

Agrees and explains further.

235

Chair Backlund

Clarifies whether they are currently optional.

237

Auty

Responds they are optional now and is unsure of the date they will become required.

241

Chair Backlund

Wonders if the past system would have difficulty operating were the portfolios to be eliminated.

244

Auty

Affirms it would.

250

Decker J.E.  Halstead

Retired teacher, Newberg School District. Informs committee of history of the CIM/CAM. Testifies in favor of HB 2371 (EXHIBIT D). Explains his experiences with the portfolios. Lists the reasons he opposes portfolios.  

387

Chair Backlund

Clarifies whether he also wants to eliminate CIM/CAM.

392

Halstead

Explains he and fellow teachers also would like the assessments to be eliminated.

399

Chair Backlund

Requests if this was an ongoing aversion

402

Halstead

Affirms.

405

Rep. Dalto

Asks what subject Mr. Halstead taught.

407

Halstead

Answers ‘history’.

409

Rep. Nolan

Inquires if he would mind if other teachers in different districts continued to use portfolios.

414

Halstead

Responds that if it works for students and teachers he would have no opposition.

419

Rep. Hopson

Asks what proportion of the teachers share his feelings.

422

Halstead

Responds that around seventy percent at the high school level do.

TAPE 19, B

002

Rep. Hopson

Requests if it would serve any purpose to pass this as a law.

005

Halstead

States that in Newberg, this was a mandate that did not work. Adds that its removal would reduce its necessity.

010

Rep. Hopson

Asks if he would object to this being an issue of local control.

012

Halstead

Negates.

015

Victoria Lukich

Teacher, David Douglas High School (DDHS). Testifies in opposition of HB 2371. Believes student portfolios are worthwhile as a comprehensive educational tool. Compares DDHS CIM to the state CIM (EXHIBIT E). Addresses concerns with CIM. Points out DDHS has made CIM a graduation requirement. Explains that the process is a tool students can use throughout their lives. Echoes the other teachers in support of portfolios and adds DDHS will continue to use them. 

147

Rep. Farr

Asks if middle school students’ portfolios transfer to high school.

150

Lukich

Explains how they conduct this.

165

Rep. Farr

Comments on this.

168

Chair Backlund

Requests her to assess the views of fellow teachers.

170

Lukich

Explains that this work is already incorporated into the curriculum and that it is for the students’ benefit.

192

Rep. Farr

Asks if they have staff dedicated solely to portfolios.

195

Lukich

Answers that each teacher is trained in this and mentors about ten students. References (EXHIBIT F).

210

Rep. Farr

Clarifies as to whether DDHS has found it necessary to have staff solely devoted to portfolio-maintenance like other schools.

218

Lukich

Negates.

219

Rep. Dalto

Asks if students understand the expectations of them.

221

Lukich

Affirms.

227

Lorna Walker

Citizen. Provides history of assessment and relates aspects to collection of portfolios. Outlines the positive and negative aspects of portfolios. Relates portfolios as tools in an overall education, providing accountability and consistency.

TAPE 20, B

002

Walker

States these will be of increasing value in the future as alternative forms of assessment.

055

Rep. Hopson

Comments on her earlier comments regarding data of new students provide by portfolios.

062

Walker

Responds and elaborates on this further.  

085

Rob Kramer

Director, Oregon Public Charter Schools. Believes that portfolios have always been utilized as a for of communication of teaching between the educator, student, and parent whether mandated or not. Believes the question is whether portfolio assessments are fair as large-scale, high-stakes assessments. Discusses alternative assessments as being the least reliable, highest costing assessments.  Submits that ‘inter-rater consistency’ does not exists unless teachers can be highly trained. Details other problems with portfolios as summative assessments.  Discusses cost of implementing assessments and of instructional time.  Believes this should be an issue of local control and that it is an unnecessary mandate.    

212

Rep. Hopson

Asks for an explanation of the unreliability of assessing pieces.

216

Kramer

Explains he views that inconsistency occurs when scoring guides are used.

225

Rep. Hopson

Requests an alternative to rating speeches.

230

Kramer

Believes the question is whether this should be a part of a high-stakes assessment system such as CIM/CAM.

249

Rep. Dalto

Comments on students speeches as a valuable learning tool. Asks what the concern is.

263

Kramer

Remarks there needs to be a limit and the cost of this activity needs to be considered.

272

Rep. Dalto

Questions if that is a legislative issue.

274

Kramer

Remarks it should be a local issue but the mandates makes it a legislative one.

281

Rep. Nolan

Comments on subjective judgment. Requests an explanation of his concern for this.

301

Kramer

Differentiates grades and assessments. Thinks subjective grading and high stakes assessments should be separates.

310

Rep. Nolan

Requests ways of improving this.

319

Kramer

Explains this has always be a subject of discussion. Reiterates his point that high-stake tests should not be part of subjective tests.

325

Rep. Nolan

Asks if reliability could be improved by assuring the raters had a common training and qualifications, and asks if the TSP process do this

345

Kramer

Answers that the more of the training that exists, the more consistency, but this is high-cost.

359

Chair Krummel

Closes public hearing on HB 2371. Adjourns meeting at 2:53 PM.

 

EXHIBIT SUMMARY

 

A – HB 2371, Portfolio Thesis, Jerry Wilson, 10 p.

B – HB 2371, Michael Mann, 2 p.

C – HB 2371, Bill Auty, 1 p.

D – HB 2371, CIM handout, Victoria Lukich , 2 p.

E – HB 2371, CIM handout, Victoria Lukich, 1 p.

F – HB 2371, CIM handout, Victoria Lukich, 1 p.