HOUSE COMMITTEE ON ELECTION AND RULES

 

 

February 08, 2005   Hearing Room E

4:00 P.M.      Tapes 5 - 7

Corrected 8/10/05

MEMBERS PRESENT:            Rep. Derrick Kitts, Chair

Rep. Paul Holvey, Vice-Chair

Rep. Kim Thatcher, Vice-Chair

Rep. Billy Dalto

Rep. Debi Farr

Rep. Mitch Greenlick

Rep. Steve March

 

STAFF PRESENT:                  Cletus Moore, Committee Administrator

Annetta Mullins, Committee Assistant

 

MEASURES/ISSUES HEARD:        

                                                HCR 5 - Public Hearing and Work Session

                                                Administration of Oregon Election Laws - Informational Meeting

                                                Introduction of Committee Measures – Work Session

                                                Vote by Mail – Public Hearing

                                                Role of Precinct Committee Persons – Public Hearing

                                                Every Citizen’s Vote Counts – Public Hearing

Value of Voters’ Pamphlets at State and Local Levels- Public Hearing

                                                Voter Registration Process – Public Hearing

 

 

These minutes are in compliance with Senate and House Rules.  Only text enclosed in quotation marks reports a speaker’s exact words.  For complete contents, please refer to the tapes.

 

TAPE/#

Speaker

Comments

TAPE 5, A

003

Chair Kitts

Calls the meeting to order at 4:00 p.m. and opens the public hearing on HCR 5.

HCR 5 – PUBLIC HEARING

024

Sen. Laurie Monnes Anderson

Testifies in support of HCR 5.  Comments on agricultural history of the Gresham area and growth in the schools.   States it is a great place to live, and to develop businesses.

043

Rep. John Lim

Reads a prepared statement in support of HCR 5 (EXHIBIT A).

080

Chantel Christensen

Gresham resident and intern for Rep. Lim.  Testifies in support of HCR 5.  Comments on moving to Gresham 10 years ago because it is a great city and that it would be great to give Gresham a birthday party.  

058

Bruce Anderson

Office of Speaker Minnis.  Testifies that Speaker Minnis gives her support to HCR 5.  Speaker Minnis has had the privilege and honor of representing parts of Gresham with Sen. Monnes Anderson and Rep. Lim over the years.  Speaks about the vitality of Gresham and the role Gresham has played in the history of Oregon.

096

Chair Kitts

Closes the public hearing and opens the work session on HCR 5.

HCR 5 – WORK SESSION

104

Rep. Thatcher

MOTION:  Moves HCR 5 be sent to the floor with a BE ADOPTED recommendation.

 

 

VOTE:  7-0-0

AYE:            In a roll call vote, all members present vote Aye.

118

Chair Kitts

The motion CARRIES.

REP. LIM will lead discussion on the floor.

 

127

Chair Kitts

Closes the public hearing on HCR 5 and opens the informational meeting on Administration of Oregon Election Laws.

ADMINISTRATION OF OREGON ELECTION LAWS – INFORMATIONAL MEETING

 

Staff

Provides copies of the Oregon Vote by Mail Manual to members (EXHIBIT B).

1130

Bill Bradbury

Secretary of State (SOS).  Tells members he will share views about the election we just had and provide background on legislation introduced this session.  Believes we are doing very well with elections in Oregon.  During the last election, Oregon had one of the highest turnouts in the nation; 86.5 percent of the registered voters voted.  There were also a record number of registered voters.  Oregon now has over two million registered voters.  We did not have people standing in the freezing rain to vote.  Oregon did not have allegations about voter fraud or law suits over counting the votes.  Believes most will agree it was the most closely observed election in history.  All states and counties in the country are asking about vote by mail.   Secretaries of State are recognizing vote by mail increases voter turnout, creates a paper record of the election and solves a lot of the problems. Thinks we owe the 36 county election officials a huge debt of thanks.  It is clear they are the implementers of the system and they made it work beautifully. 

185

Bradbury

States that the Oregon Central Voter Registration Project (OCVR) is on time and is on budget.  Oregon is only one of four states that will meet the federal deadline to have the registration in place in the primary election in 2006.  Six pioneer counties are going to run pilot programs this year and the full program will roll out in the 2006 election. 

 

 

States that the state-wide voter registration data base will eliminate voter fraud.  In 2006, Oregon will have the cleanest voter roles in the country because no one can be registered in more than one county and no vote that should not be counted will be counted.  The problems in the last election had more to do with voter registration cards and signature gatherers and they want to extend the ban on pay-for-signatures, which is in the initiative petition process, to registration cards and nominating petitions. 

222

Chair Kitts

Asks if Bradbury is talking about the Nader situation when he talks about “nominating petitions.” 

 

Bradbury

Responds affirmatively.  States that we saw the “bounty hunter syndrome” that caused a lot of problems and some very real misconduct.

232

Bradbury

Comments on legislative priorities that came from last year’s bipartisan blue ribbon panel study on campaign finance disclosure laws.  SB 160 encapsulates the recommendations of four former Secretaries of State: Mark Hatfield, Barbara Roberts, Phil Keisling and Norma Paulus.  They worked on a panel that called for the SOS to introduce disclosure legislation.  It calls for continuous web-based electronic reporting of campaign finance transactions; it would be continuous reporting.  It would make it easier to file reports and eliminate clerical and deadline errors.  It will give more transparency to the election process and make it easier for the small political action committees (PACs) who rarely have activity.  It is a significant reform. 

265

Bradbury

Explains that another priority is asking the legislature to come up with $700,000 matching funds for the nearly $18 million that remains in the federal treasury to implement the Help American Vote Act (HAVA) that we are required to do.  States that the federal government is earning interest and that Oregon could be realizing the interest.    

288

Bradbury

Asks for the committee’s help in improving Oregon’s election system. 

 

Chair Kitts

Thanks Bradbury for the information. 

298

Rep. Greenlick

Asks why the ballots go back to the counties instead of a centralized location.

305

Bradbury

Explains that the reason the ballots go back to the counties is the counties have their systems set up to count them.  It makes sense to maintain that system because there are so many ballot types.

 

Rep. Greenlick

Alludes to the vote count for the governor in Washington state and asks if Bradbury has looked at or reviewed the recount system in Oregon, and whether he is comfortable with it.

323

Bradbury

Responds it would take Oregon a long time to recount votes.  States that Oregon saw that four years ago in the Presidential election between Al Gore and George Bush.  It delayed knowing the results for about 15 days.  States that he feels good about Oregon’s recount procedures and feels good about Oregon’s hand recount and having the paper ballots for a recount.  It is a very excellent standard to have to ease the concerns about electronic voting.

353

Rep. Kitts

Asks if there is anything this committee can do to help in the recount procedures.  Comments on being in Florida during the recount and asks if Oregon could handle the kinds of problems they had in Florida.

376

Bradbury

Responds that Oregon is a punch card-free zone.  Believes Oregon has substantial processes in place for recount and the use of election boards which are bi-partisan to review ballots and make sure every voter’s vote is counted if at all possible and to determine what the voter meant.

394

John Lindback

Director of Elections Division, Secretary of State’s Office.  States that virtually every state in the Nation reviewed its recount procedures after the incident in Florida, including Oregon.  The county clerks and the Oregon Elections Division worked together to review the procedures.  Detailed procedures are in place.  Adds that the procedures may not contemplate every situation that might happen because they find with every election, no matter how complete they try to make the laws, something comes along that they have never seen before.  States that is how election law gets written.  Gives example of people being paid during the registration drive; that was not contemplated by our election laws. 

425

Lindback

Advises members that he has asked Washington state officials if they would be willing, when the litigation is settled, to meet with Oregon about the lessons learned there so that Oregon can determine if some of the things they learned in their recount process would be applicable in Oregon so the procedures in Oregon can be adjusted. 

440

Chair Kitts

Asks that the Election Division let the committee know their findings after meeting with the Washington officials.

444

Rep. Holvey

Ask for a description of HAVA, its requirements, and what happens if they do not get the $700,000 for matching funds.

458

Bradbury

Responds that if they do not get the match, they will not have the money to finish the centralized voter registration system.  The federal law requires Oregon to have a centralized voter registration system so the legislature would then, under federal mandate, have to spend $3.5 million dollars. 

TAPE 6, A

004

Bradbury

Explains that HAVA required: phasing out punch cards; that every state have a centralized voter registration system; that every state provide for the disabled community to be able to vote privately and independently; and requirements for voter education. 

010

Lindback

Explains that HAVA requires using voter machines in polling places that signal to the voter they made an error.  If Oregon were to return to polling place elections, we would have to purchase all new voting machines for every precinct for an election that included a federal candidate or issue.

018

Bradbury

Interjects that the notice is not about who you voted for.   Gives example that someone may have voted for both candidates for the same office.

026

Lindback

Adds that the requirements are the reason why so many states are interested in vote by mail.  HAVA requires states that have vote-by-mail to have an education program that instructs the voter how to examine their ballot to make sure they don’t have mistakes, and if they do, they can request a replacement ballot.    

034

Chair Kitts

Comments that Bradbury said a percentage of the $700,000 would be used to finish the centralized voter registration system.  Asks if the extra money would go to a web-based reporting system for contribution and expenditure reports (C&Es). 

045

Lindback

Responds they are hopeful of that and will be contacting the Elections Assistance Commission to try to make a determination. 

050

Chair Kitts

Comments he thinks the web-based reporting system ties in with the press conference by the Speaker and the Minority Leader today on trying to put in some parameters so we don’t see the same cracks in the existing system that we have seen lately.  Asks witnesses to report back on their findings.

058

Rep. Thatcher

Comments it has been brought up to her that perhaps there is not a witness when voter intent is to be determined in the recount process.   Asks if a witness is required and if not, what guarantees integrity.

063

Bradbury

Responds that voter intent is only determined by an election board which consists of several members.  It is a bi-partisan board and they have to agree. 

079

Rep. Thatcher

Gives example of a person voting Republican on all candidates but it may appear that the voter missed one, and then there is an assumption that the person must have meant to vote Republican.  Asks if that is something that comes up. 

 

Bradbury

Gestures that it does not come up.

083

Lindback

Responds  that guidelines on voter intent is included in the Oregon Vote By Mail Manual (EXHIBIT B), which the counties are required to follow and they believe the county clerks can give antidotal stories about the situations they run into while determining voter intent.  States that they have worked with the county clerks on the procedures so that all counties are doing it the same way.

085

Rep. Dalto

Asks if Bradbury has more information on the “bounty hunters.”

 

Bradbury

States that in saying “bounty hunter” they mean people being paid by the voter registration card or by the signature, rather than being paid hourly, which is currently required for initiative petitions.   Comments on allegations last time that collectors were only being paid for cards from one party.  There were also allegations that the collectors would change the party so they could get paid for it. 

102

Chair Kitts

States he is concerned about the guidelines for military ballots.  Asks why military ballots would not be counted, and whether there is a leeway if the military ballots are received after the deadline. 

 

Bradbury

States that any ballot, no matter what its source, in Oregon must be in the county election office by 8:00 p.m. on election day.  They do not use postmarks.  The military and overseas ballots go out 45 days prior to the election.  They also work with the federal Voting Assistance Project and there are other efforts to make sure those overseas and those in the military can make use of their franchise to be citizens. 

133

Rep. March

Comments on recount of the Treasurer’s race in the 2004 primary.  Asks if any lawsuits were filed in Oregon about the last election, other than the allegations about the registration cards. 

 

Bradbury

Responds there was not.  States that the last election was the most observed.  Their office was asking for attorney general (AG) opinions every other day on various issues.  Every county went through a process of putting clear lines on the floor so the observers knew where they could be. 

170

Chair Kitts

Asks if the 8:00 p.m. deadline is statewide policy.

 

Bradbury

Explains there are official drop sites for ballots.  The ballots need to be in the drop box or the voter must be in line y 8:00 p.m. to vote.

208

Lindback

Adds that if someone is in line at a drop site at 8:00 p.m., the person can drop their ballot in the official drop box.  Gives example of drive-up ballot boxes.

 

Chair Kitts

Asks if someone who is in a line one-half mile long at 8:00 p.m. might vote at 9:00 p.m. 

 

Bradbury

Responds yes. 

224

Rep. Holvey

Asks if there is an observer at every drop box site.

 

Lindback

States the counties have personnel or can deputize personnel to be at the drop site at the 8:00 pm deadline.  Those persons are instructed to allow those people in line to complete the act of voting. 

241

Rep. Dalto

Asks if the people in Eastern Oregon vote according to Valley time.

 

Lindback

Responds that everyone votes by their own time.

 

Rep. Dalto

Asks if there is a procedure with SOS that stipulates what it means to be at the back of the line to cut someone off at the appointed time. 

 

Lindback

States they have talked to the clerks and he believes they would send someone to get at the back of the line.  Comments on how Multnomah County handled the long line at 8:00 p.m.

317

Rep. Dalto

Comments on being denied entry of his voter pamphlet information in the 2002 primary election, while someone else who came in 20 minutes late during the 2004 general election was able to submit his information.  Comments on how the line is handled in SOS and a lawsuit about when a Voter’s Pamphlet statement could be accepted.  States there are inconsistencies in the SOS about how it is applied.

329

Chair Kitts

Thanks the witnesses and asks the committee to stand at ease at 4:54 p.m.

 

Chair Kitts

Reconvenes the meeting at 5:00 p.m. and welcomes the county clerks.  Explains that the purpose of this committee is not to be in an adversarial role with the county clerks; the purpose is to work with them and hear their concerns and find out what the legislature can do to help them do their jobs and relieve any concerns with the Oregon public and everyone else. 

381

Dee Berman

Crook County Clerk and President of the Association of County Clerks.  Thanks the committee for the opportunity to be here.  States that 34 of the 36 counties are represented here today; Polk and Lake counties are not able to be here today. 

 

County Clerks and County Election Officials

In the audience identify themselves.

TAPE 5, B

001

County Clerks and County Election Officials

In the audience continue to identify themselves.

033

Nellie Bogue-Hibbert

Union County Clerk.   Reviews the evolution of the vote by mail elections process since 1981.  Comments that the record turnout last election is a testament to vote by mail.  States that Oregon has a very well defined manner during elections and it is a win-win for everyone.  States that she carries her Oregon Vote by Mail Manual (EXHIBIT B) with her to all meetings because it is the definitive thing that helps them in all the elections.

101

Jan Coleman

Yamhill County Clerk.  Comments on her personal history of working in elections, and her first election which used punch card ballots in the polling places.  They had an eight percent turnout out of 900 voters.  Today they get a 25-30 percent turnout.  In the last election, 70 percent of those who could vote did vote and that is much higher than in past years.  Election officials particularly in the Valley were inundated with registrations.  There was no waiting to vote.  States that comments come in unsolicited about the convenience of being able to vote at home.  Speaks of the advantage of not having polling places in Oregon, including maintaining the polling places and the HAVA requirement that every polling place have some way for the disabled to vote, and states that vote by mail is saving money.

161

Jim Barrow

Ex-Officio County Clerk, Umatilla County.  Stated he is not an elector in Oregon; he lives in Walla Walla, Washington and is appointed as the election official and county clerk in Umatilla County, which is a home-rule county.  States he has voted by mail in every election in his life because he has never lived where he could go to a polling place.  He learned he could vote permanently absentee and plans to continue to do that.  Explains the consolidation of polling places in Washington due to the limited number of people voting.  Speaks in support of vote by mail and hopes that the enhancements to vote by mail, including funding for OCVR, will receive favorable attention by this committee.

221

Dee Berman

States she has three other county clerks to testify.

230

Tassie O’Neil

Tillamook County Clerk.  Explains the Oregon Vote-by-Mail Manual (EXHIBIT B) is a compilation of information from county clerks and the SOS that provides uniformity on the election processes and procedures.  Explains they have a committee that makes changes in the manual; it is a work in progress.  It includes input from all counties, the SOS and others, which could include this committee.  Explains that the manual is on the SOS web page.   States there are instances in the manual about voter intent.  Suggests the manual may help the committee clarify how the county clerks determine voter intent. 

261

Charolette McIver

Wallowa County Clerk.  Asks that the committee make sure that whatever they do to enhance the election process, to not make it harder on the voters to vote.  The rural counties will be concerned about the mailing window for the ballots.  Currently they have a maximum of 18 days, reduced from 20 days.  Rural counties would be greatly affected if the timeline were reduced further.  Comments on limited delivery of mail in rural areas. 

301

Annette Newingham

Lane County Election Official and Legislative Chair of the Oregon Association of County Clerks.  Comments on legislation introduced by the SOS for the clerks and minor amendments dealing with housekeeping things that have come up.  Most of the issues relate to the day-to-day process they do.  They find that some things have become dated and not pertinent to the way they do business today and they want to make sure they are adhering to state law as well as the Oregon Vote by Mail Manual (EXHIBIT B).  States they have been working with Senator Nelson about precinct committee persons and they hope the bill will come out soon.   Comments on impact of write in votes for Soil and Water Conservation Districts and precinct committee persons. 

 

Newingham

States they would have concerns about a September primary because there is a consolidation of time and there is a lot of danger.  States she will share information they had two years ago relating to the September primary date.  States that Washington state had many problems that were the result of the primary election being so close to the general election.  States she and Nellie Bogue-Hibbert attended a meeting with the Washington auditors because Washington was asking questions about vote by mail.  One comment the Washington auditors made was the conflict they had with the primary election in September.  They are going to introduce legislation to hold the primary earlier in the year in Washington.  States that the Oregon county clerks would like to be resources for this committee. 

414

Chair Kitts

Invites the county clerks to call committee members if they have questions and concerns.  Comments that filing C& E reports by all candidates on the web-based system would effectively relieve the county clerks’ offices from having to audit the reports.  Asks if the county clerks can comment. 

 

Newingham

Responds that the filing system has a greater impact for the state.  The C&E filings are tremendous at the state level compared to the local level.  States she doesn’t think it would directly impact the county clerks. 

TAPE 6, B

012

Chair Kitts

Asks why proof of identification is only considered a requirement for federal elections, and whether Article 2, Section VI of the Oregon Constitution implies that it is essential for state and local elections also.

 

Newingham

Responds that HAVA was reviewed by a lot of people including attorneys and the Attorney General’s office.  They interpreted what the county clerks need to do.  They also met with other states to get the correct interpretation of what identification is required.  It was never interpreted that we would need to have proof of identification for the state.  States that they request identification for all voters when the registration cards are received by mail.  They do not treat them differently in Oregon.  They would follow through with the identification after they receive a registration card.  The fact that Oregon is going to the centralized voter registration system will eliminate, eventually, the need for the identification because they will be providing the driver license and if not, the identification will be the last four digits of their social security.  States that when she puts her name in first in March, she will be connected to the Department of Motor Vehicles and driver license number.  Believes that will address the issues of HAVA.

040

Chair Kitts

Asks what would happen if, instead of sending the elections person from the county out to the end of the line as a place holder, they send two out—one as a placeholder and one to collect every ballot from the placeholder to the door and then lock the door. 

024

O’Neil

Responds she believes that is a good idea.

 

Rep. Farr

States there was a contentious race for mayor in Eugene and there was a lot of momentum behind a write in candidate.  The person that was asked to be the write in chose not to move his name forward.  States that many were not satisfied with one name on the ballot so they still wrote his name in.  Asks if those write in ballots were counted.

 

Newingham

Responds that they did count the write ins.  Explains they use optical scan and the system tallies the write ins.  It gives a total tabulation for how many write ins there are for a position.  They first look at the total vote for write ins and determine who the vote-getter was.  As long as the write-ins are less than those of the top vote-getter, she does not have to hand tally.  They would rather not hand tally.  States that if the write-in count were equal to or greater than the top vote-getter, she would be obligated to do a tally of each individual name. 

 

Rep. Farr

Asks what costs are associated with it.  States that a number of ballots were kicked out and they had to be hand counted.

 

Newingham

Responds that they do not have to be hand counted.  States that her equipment actually tabulates the write-ins without having to do any further work as long as she does not have to hand tally it because it is equal to or greater than.

090

Chair Kitts

Asks what happens if someone does not sign their ballot, whether the process is consistent throughout the state, and whether the ballots are opened before the cutoff is made.

 

Newingham

Explains they would never open a ballot that does not have a signature because the ballot is not countable.  Explains Lane County’s process for returning all unsigned ballots.  States they do not have to replace ballots within five days of the election.

126

Chair Kitts

Asks if counties have discretion in the length of time to call the voter, or mail the ballot back.

 

Newingham

States the Vote by Mail Manual outlines what they are to do and all counties adhere to a guideline. 

 

Chair Kitts

Asks if counties have discretion beyond the minimum requirements.

 

McIver

Explains efforts in Wallowa County to contact the voter.

 

Chair Kitts

Asks if a ballot that has not been signed and one that has a signature that does not match are treated the same.

 

Newingham

Responds that the two processes are not treated the same.  They would not mail back a ballot if the signature did not match.  The voter has 10 days to respond to notice that their signature does not match the one on file.   

177

Chair Kitts

Explains his concern is what happens to a ballot if it is submitted at the deadline and the signature does not match.  Asks if the records would show that the person did not vote or that the person attempted to vote.

 

Newingham

Responds that the manner it is noted in the record might be different in different counties.  Explains that they first check the signature to prevent multiple ballots from being counted.  Explains they must manage their systems to determine if there are multiple ballots from the same voter and to prevent multiple ballots from being counted.   Adds that if they can determine the signature is that of the voter, they would be able to process and count the ballot.

 

Chair Kitts

Comments that he does not want to have a pile of ballots that were not counted but would be counted in a recount, and wants the invalid ballots to be discarded. 

220

Rep. Holvey

Asks if the county clerks have concern with the voter registration cards to make sure people are only registering once and are verifying that the people are eligible to vote.

 

O’Neil

Responds that they are implementing the Oregon Centralized Voter Registration system.  In that system, the identification number from the driver license or the last four digits of the person’s social security number will help.  Each county will be able to access the system and they will be able to identify a person if that person moves from one county to another.  That would make duplication registrations hard to do.

 

Rep. Holvey

Asks if they think the centralized voter system will solve the problem with multiple registrations.

 

O’Neil

Responds that it will help.

270

Rep. March

Comments on the previous informality of the committee proceedings.

 

Chair Kitts

Closes the informational hearing on Administration of Oregon Election Laws and opens a work session for the purpose of Introduction of Committee Measures.

INTRODUCTION OF COMMITTEE MEASURES -  WORK SESSION

328

Cletus Moore

Administrator.  Advises members that the committee has five LC drafts for consideration for introduction.

335

Rep. Thatcher

MOTION:  Moves LC's:  1746 (EXHIBIT C), 1750 (EXHIBIT D), 1751 (EXHIBIT E), 1752 (EXHIBIT F), AND 1755 (EXHIBIT G) BE INTRODUCED as committee bills.

341

 

VOTE:  7-0-0

AYE:            In a roll call vote, all members present vote Aye.

 

Chair Kitts

The motion CARRIES.

 

347

Chair Kitts

Opens a public hearing on Vote by Mail, Role of Precinct Committee Persons, Every Citizen’s Vote Counts, Value of Voters’ Pamphlets at State and Local Levels, and Voter Registration Process.

ROLE OF PRECINCT COMMITTEE PERSONS, EVERY CITIZEN’S VOTE COUNTS, VALUE OF VOTERS’ PAMPHLETS AT STATE AND LOCAL LEVELS, AND VOTER REGISTRATION PROCESS – PUBLIC HEARING

327

Ruth Bendl

Portland resident.  Reviews comments in email to Chair Kitts and Rep. Thatcher on the Voter Registration Process and Vote by Mail, including drop site security, opening ballots and determining voter intent, and ballot storage (EXHIBIT H)

430

Chair Kitts

Advises Bendl that he will respond to her email. 

 

TAPE 7, A

010

Kappy Eaton

League of Women Voters.  Submits and summarizes written testimony in support of a Voter Registration Process (EXHIBIT I) that provides assurances to voters on the process and access to information, in support of continuing the Voters’ Pamphlets (EXHIBIT J), in support of Vote by Mail (EXHIBIT K), and efforts, including HAVA, to make sure that Every Citizen’s Vote Counts (EXHIBIT L). 

028

Sharon Cornish

Hillsboro resident.  Submits copies of email sent to committee members relating to the Vote by Mail election process, and chart listing tasks and their comments on those tasks (EXHIBIT M).  Comments on need for proof of eligibility of those registering to vote, and security of the voting and ballot counting processes.

The following prepared testimony is submitted for the record without public testimony:

 

Geri Bitz

Clackamas County resident.  Submits written testimony relating to Vote by Mail stating her positive experiences working at polling places and questions processing ballots in the vote by mail system (EXHIBIT N).

058

Chair Kitts

Adjourns the meeting at 6:08 p.m.

 

 

EXHIBIT SUMMARY

 

  1. HCR 5, prepared statement, Rep. Lim, 1 p
  2. Election Laws, Administration of Oregon, staff, 75 pp
  3. Introductions, LC 1746, staff, 2 pp
  4. Introductions, LC 1750, staff, 1 p
  5. Introductions, LC 1751, staff, 3 pp
  6. Introductions, LC 1752, staff, 3 pp
  7. Introductions, LC 1755, 1 p
  8. Voter Registration Process, Every Citizen’s Vote Counts, & Vote by Mail, prepared statement, Ruth Bendl, 2 pp
  9. Voter Registration Process, prepared statement, Kappy Eaton, 1 p
  10. Value of Voters’ Pamphlets, prepared statement, Kappy Eaton, 1 p
  11. Vote by Mail, prepared statement, Kappy Eaton, 1 p
  12. Every Citizen’s Vote Counts, prepared statement, Kappy Eaton, 1 p
  13. Voter Registration Process and Vote by Mail, Sharon Cornish, 26 pp
  14. Vote by Mail, prepared statement, Geri Bitz, 2 pp