CONFERENCE COMMITTEE ON SB 389

 

 

June 23, 2005 Hearing Room D

5:00 P.M.      Tapes 1 - 4

 

MEMBERS PRESENT:            Sen. Charlie Ringo, Chair

Sen. Alan Bates

Sen. David Nelson           

Rep. Brian Boquist

Rep. Arni Roblan

Rep. Patti Smith

 

MEMBER VISITING:                  Rep. Chuck Burley

 

STAFF PRESENT:                  Matt Shields, Committee Administrator

Katie Lowry, Committee Assistant

 

MEASURES/ISSUES HEARD:        

SB 389B –Work Session

 

These minutes are in compliance with Senate and House Rules.  Only text enclosed in quotation marks reports a speaker’s exact words.  For complete contents, please refer to the tapes.

 

TAPE/#

Speaker

Comments

TAPE 1, A

005

Chair Ringo

Calls the meeting to order at 5:04 p.m. Makes opening remarks. Opens a work session on SB 389B.

SB 389B – WORK SESSION

 

Matt Shields

Committee Administrator. Submits the –B6 amendments to SB 389B (EXHIBIT A) and an excerpt from ORS 498 (EXHIBIT B).

020

Roy Elicker

Deputy Director, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). Explains they have a PowerPoint presentation which will provide an overview of cougar management and cougar research.

025

Ron Anglin

Wildlife Division Administrator, ODFW. Submits written testimony (EXHIBIT C). Submits and presents a PowerPoint presentation titled Oregon Cougar Management and Research (EXHIBIT D).

040

Chair Ringo

Asks if 8,000 is their best estimate for the cougar population.

041

Anglin

Explains that it is the best estimate at this point in time under the current model.

042

Rep. Roblan

Verifies that it is not the current number, but that it is the population that can be maintained in the state.

043

Anglin

Explains that is the estimated number if the population goes unchecked. Explains they currently estimate there are about 5,000 cougars in the state.

046

Anglin

Continues PowerPoint presentation.

095

Chair Ringo

Asks witness to explain damage harvest.

096

Anglin

States it is defined in ORS 498.012. Explains the statute sets out specific criteria for landowners to take cougars without a permit.

102

Chair Ringo

Asks if the landowners can use dogs to kill the cougars.

103

Anglin

Replies yes. Comments that was specifically allowed in Measure 18 (1994). Refers to ORS 498.164. Refers to human safety statutes in ORS 498.166 which identifies conditions when cougars can be taken when they are threatening humans.

108

Chair Ringo

Asks if dogs can be used in those circumstances.

109

Anglin

Replies yes.

110

Rep. P. Smith

Asks witness to explain what it means to use dogs for hunting.

113

Anglin

Discusses hunting cougars with trained dogs.

134

Sen. Bates

Wonders how big the territory is that most cougars occupy.

135

Anglin

Responds.

138

Sen. Bates

Points out that restricting dogs to a property owner’s property is meaningless. Remarks the cougars are moving quickly and constantly. Asks if that is correct.

142

Anglin

Explains it is common that by the time a hound can be brought to the site, the cougar has already moved off of the private landowner’s property and onto adjacent property or public land. Explains that the two landowner’s cannot work together to solve the problem unless the adjacent landowner is also suffering property damage.

147

Sen. Bates

Asks if it is common for a cougar to make rounds through his territory and return to the same area every 10-15 days.

148

Anglin

Comments that cougars roam throughout their territory. Explains there are different conditions which affect how often they cycle through. Remarks cougars are territorial.

151

Rep. Burley

Refers to range of 200 square miles in the Umpqua area. Wonders if it is different in the east side of the state.

154

Anglin

Discusses previous research done.

182

Anglin

Continues PowerPoint presentation.

219

Rep. Roblan

Comments on damage complaints. Asks if there is compensation to landowners for damages done. Inquires as to a funding source and an estimate for a response to a damage complaint.

227

Anglin

Explains there are no compensation funds available for livestock or other animals lost to damage. Explains all costs associated with responding to damage complaints are paid for by licensing dollars. Replies he does not have an estimate for damage complaints. Discusses money given to Wildlife Services each biennium.

243

Rep. P. Smith

Mentions that witness said they receive two or three complaints per day. Wonders if ODFW writes down every complaint or if they determine what registers as a complaint. 

250

Anglin

Replies they write down every complaint.  Explains they ask specific questions in order to determine whether or not it was a cougar attack. Discusses difficulty with human safety complaints.

278

Rep. P. Smith

Wonders if ODFW decides the validity of a complaint, or if every complaint is taken at face value.

283

Anglin

Explains they begin by taking every complaint at face value. Explains that they do not record it as a complaint if they find it is not a cougar or a damage complaint after questioning or site inspection.

292

Rep. P. Smith

Explains that she receives many calls from people who have complaints or have seen cougars but have not called the ODFW.

299

Anglin

Points out that the ODFW does not relocate cougars. Explains that if a cougar is moved, it is still a damage or safety threat. Discusses unsuccessful attempts to rehabilitate orphaned kittens. Discusses research of unsuccessful attempts of relocation of adult cougars.

337

Sen. Bates

Wonders how successful the ODFW is at tracking and killing a cougar when a complaint on a cougar is received.

340

Anglin

Replies it depends on many factors and provides examples.

372

Sen. Nelson

Explains he hears from his constituents that damage is done to wild animals. States there is no way to track that damage. Asks for comments.

384

Anglin

Remarks he will cover that in his presentation.

389

Anglin

Continues PowerPoint presentation.

TAPE 2, A

001

Anglin

Continues PowerPoint presentation. Discusses a project done by the ODFW using federal dollars. Mentions lawsuit filed against the federal government to stop the project. Discusses the decision made.

009

Chair Ringo

Asks when that decision was.

010

Anglin

Replies 2002. Continues PowerPoint Presentation.

038

Chair Ringo

Asks if witness has a detailed summary of the study that the ODFW intends to do if the bill is re-passed with the –B6 amendments.

041

Anglin

Replies they could probably provide a summary of the predation aspect of the study. Explains it would take a few days to put together a summary on the human safety aspect of the study.

047

Chair Ringo

States that he has been given a list of questions regarding the study. Explains it would make sense to look at a summary in order to answer the questions and then ask follow-up questions. Asks if that is reasonable.

051

Anglin

Replies yes.

052

Chair Ringo

Wonders about the source of money to fund this study. Points out the amendment apportions $375,000 for the study.

056

Anglin

Explains the ODFW can conduct the predation portion of the study using existing funds. Explains the human safety portion of the study requires $375,000 per biennium and would take approximately three years to do the work. Believes they would report back during the 2009 legislative session, so the total amount of money would be $750,000.  

069

Chair Ringo

Wonders how big of an area would be used to perform the human safety portion of the study.

071

Anglin

Provides details for the approximate planned location of the human safety study.

078

Chair Ringo

Asks if the animals would be removed for the study.

080

Anglin

Explains how the human safety study would be implemented.

091

Chair Ringo

Verifies that the predation study contemplates removing animals.

092

Anglin

Confirms the predation study would also kill cougars. Explains those study areas are already defined.

093

Chair Ringo

Asks how the cougars would be killed. Asks if there would be hunting tags issued.

094

Anglin

Explains how the predation study would be implemented.

104

Sen. Nelson

Believes there is enough information to make conclusions without having to do further study. Wonders why something cannot be done now.

115

Anglin

Explains reasoning for performing the study.

143

Sen. Nelson

Asks witness to repeat figures provided in testimony.

147

Anglin

Replies 86 out of 104 elk mortalities were due to predation. Explains 72 were due to cougars and 14 were due to bears.

150

Sen. Nelson

Points out that approximately 86% was due to predation. Reiterates question of why a study needs to be done. Conveys the concerns of constituents in his district. Wonders about spending $375,000 for another study when the facts are already there. Emphasizes there is a predation problem.

166

Sen. Bates

Asks what the normal expected survival rate of calves was in the past when the population of cougars was smaller. Wonders if there was a larger survival rate than there is currently.

169

Anglin

Explains that in portions of northeast Oregon associated with the study area there were between 51 and 65 percent survival of elk calves. States that the current rate is between 26 and 32 percent.

173

Sen. Bates

Verifies there has been a dramatic decrease of calf survival.

175

Anglin

Replies yes. Notes the ODFW did not only look at predation impacts as part of the research. Explains they also looked at nutrition to see if nutrition was causing low survival of the elk calves. Explains the ODFW discovered that nutrition is not playing a role in the survival of elk calves.

181

Chair Ringo

Wonders if there are other factors besides predation by cougars.

182

Anglin

Explains the research currently indicates cougars are the cause of the decline in the population.

184

Rep. P. Smith

Mentions this issue has been addressed in the House this session and last session. Emphasizes that another study is not necessary. Believes this issue needs to be addressed before someone in the state gets hurt by a cougar. Discusses public hearing held in Baker County. Believes there is a problem in Oregon and it needs to be fixed.

196

Rep. Boquist

Submits and discusses testimony from HB 2759 (2005) and HB 2781 (2005) heard at the public hearing in Baker City (EXHIBIT E). Asks if the facts given to the committee previously in the submitted testimony are still correct.

217

Anglin

Replies yes.

219

Rep. Roblan

States he wants to ask a series of questions that go back historically. Wonders how quotas were set and met during the period of time before Ballot Measure 18 when ODFW had the full range of management tools which included dogs and hunting.

225

Anglin

Responds. Discusses relation to damage complaints.

254

Rep. Roblan

Comments on Measure 18. Wonders if a number of cougars had been established in the model that was sustainable in Oregon and would keep the damage level down.

260

Anglin

Replies not at that point in time. Explains in detail.

267

Rep. Roblan

Wonders if there are now objectives established that would be the number of cougars that would be sustainable in the state.

270

Anglin

Replies the ODFW is in the process of developing those objectives for the cougar management plan that will be presented to the commission this fall. Explains they will not have a management objective specifically for cougars until that time. Explains the management objectives.

280

Rep. Roblan

Wonders how to set the objectives for the quotas currently.

283

Anglin

Provides background information on the quota system.

293

Rep. Burley

Mentions comments made in testimony regarding maximum number of 8,000 cougars. Asks what witness means by the term “unchecked”.

300

Anglin

Explains unchecked means when the population would reach its maximum. States it is called density dependence. Explains how it is estimated.

307

Rep. Burley

Points out the population is currently at 5,000. Wonders how long it will be before the population reaches 8,000.

313

Anglin

Explains it is difficult to predict because it is based on natural and human caused annual mortality rates of the young. Comments on previous and current growth rates.

329

Rep. Burley

Believes the ODFW currently has a lot of information. Expresses concerns with attacks/complaints seen in the news. Comments on human safety.

356

Chair Ringo

Comments he is here to gather information. Understands that others have had many hours worth of public hearings on this issue. Wants to hear from the proponents and opponents in order to analyze this issue.

364

Sen. Bates

Relates personal story. Refers to the chart on model of cougar populations. Asks if the chart is reasonably accurate.

382

Anglin

Believes the chart to be reasonably accurate. Explains there is no way to definitively estimate the exact number of cougars.

386

Sen. Bates

Understands. Notes that from 1973 forward, approximately 1,000 cougars are being added to the population each year. Calculates that the population will top out in about five or six years if the carrying capacity for the state is 8,000. Points out there was a slight uptake in the rate of growth for the cougar population when the use of hounds was banned. Comments that the rate of growth does not accelerate, but continues the same curve. Wonders how a decrease in the cougar population would be accomplished if it is determined that the cougar population needs to be decreased. Points out that the last time there was a reduction in the population was in 1963. Explains that it seems that using or not using dogs didn’t seem to have much affect on the growth rate.

421

Anglin

Provides background information on the cougar population. Replies the ODFW would reduce the cougar population by killing cougars in some manner. Believes the most effective way to kill cougars is through the use of dogs. 

TAPE 1, B

010

Sen. Bates

Asks if there are any other restrictions on hunting cougars besides using dogs.

013

Anglin

Explains the cougar hunting season.

018

Sen. Bates

Wonders if having a year round hunting season and no other restrictions besides the use of dogs would lower the population.

021

Anglin

Replies no. Provides an explanation.

025

Sen. Bates

Asks if using predator calls is ineffective.

026

Anglin

Remarks it has been somewhat effective. Relates experiences of hunters using calls. Details when using predator calls is most effective.

036

Sen. Bates

Wonders about using bait to hunt cougars.

037

Anglin

Comments cougars do not respond to bait.

043

Rep. Boquist

Wonders when the ODFW last responded to a human safety complaint.

045

Anglin

Responds.

050

Rep. Boquist

Inquires if the ODFW investigated the complaint in Seaside.

051

Anglin

Reports the state police investigated the complaint in Seaside.

053

Chair Ringo

Thanks witnesses for their testimony. Asks witnesses to provide detailed information on the proposed studies to the committee members.

062

Andrew Wile

Resident, Seaside. Introduces himself.

069

Chair Ringo

Asks witness to tell the committee what happened.

070

A. Wile

Relates personal story.

073

Chair Ringo

Asks if he has some scratches.

074

A. Wile

Replies yes.

075

Lina Wile

Mother of Andrew Wile. States he did not receive scratches, they were marks. Notes he did not get bitten.

076

A. Wile

States they were practically scratches.

077

L. Wile

Believes the cougar was not attacking him.

078

Chair Ringo

Asks if there is anything else A. Wile would like to tell the committee.

079

A. Wile

Replies no.

080

Rep. Boquist

Inquires what the area surrounding their house is.

082

A. Wile

Replies there is a forest in his back yard.

083

Chair Ringo

Verifies that he is from Seaside.

084

A. Wile

Replies yes.

085

Chair Ringo

Asks if it was a big cat.

086

A. Wile

Replies yes. Explains it would probably be about the size of a doorway if it stood up on two legs.

088

L. Wile

Comments on the validity of the cougar sighting.

099

Andrew Wile, Sr.

Father of Andrew Wile. Introduces himself.

100

L. Wile

States that A. Wile, Sr. was home when their son came in and said he got attacked by a cougar. Explains that is how he stated it at first.

103

A. Wile, Sr.

Relates personal story. Comments on the need for options other than performing a study on human safety.

115

L. Wile

Comments on adjustments made in their neighborhood in order to avoid cougar encounters. Makes comments regarding deer in their area.

131

Rep. P. Smith

Thanks witnesses for driving from Seaside. States they heard testimony last session about a boy who was attacked in Spokane, Washington.

146

Ron Harder

Citizen. Provides background information on cougar hunting licenses. Responds to Sen. Bates’ question.

167

Paul Phillips

Safari Club International. Expresses opposition to the -1 amendments. Testifies in support of the B-engrossed bill. Submits written testimony (EXHIBIT F).

182

Dennis Reynolds

Grant County Judge. Relates personal experiences with cougars. Relates cougar sighting reports in his community.

280

Reynolds

Continues relating cougar sighting reports in his community.

315

Reynolds

Relates observations with regards to the cougar population.

326

Reynolds

Testifies in support of the B-engrossed version of SB 389.

364

Al Elkins

Oregon Hunters Association. Explains the ODFW has received signed petitions from Grant County residents that state belief that there are too many cougars. Discusses recent cougar sightings documented in Grant County. Comments on the desire to keep the population of deer and elk at a higher level due to the economic impact.

383

Rep. Boquist

Believes there were four or five county commissioners who testified in Baker City. Inquires if the county would absorb the cost of an election if there was a petition from electors in the county under the original law.

393

Reynolds

Replies yes. Explains Measure 18 did not carry in those five counties.

411

Chair Ringo

The committee stands at ease.

417

Chair Ringo

Calls the committee back to order.

418

Scott Beckstead

Mayor, Waldport. Relates personal experiences with cougars in his area. Comments on Measure 18 and Measure 34 (1996). Comments on validity of cougar sightings/attacks.

TAPE 2, B

001

Beckstead

Testifies in opposition to SB 389B.

039

Chair Ringo

Verifies that witness believes that using radio-collared dogs to hunt cougars is unsportsmanlike and cruel.

045

Beckstead

Replies yes.

046

Chair Ringo

Asks why witness believes this is cruel. Inquires about difference between general hunting and the use of dogs in hunting.

048

Beckstead

Responds.

067

Chair Ringo

Mentions that the ODFW testified that bait and wandering through the woods were not effective. Believes the conclusion is that using dogs is necessary if there is an overpopulation of cougars.

072

Beckstead

Believes that ODFW has not considered all of the alternatives.

073

Chair Ringo

Wonders what the alternatives are.

074

Beckstead

Discusses increasing the length of the hunting season.

078

Chair Ringo

Confirms one option is to increase the length of the hunting season. Asks if there are any other options that would be effective in reducing cougar populations.

080

Beckstead

Believes hunters are getting better at hunting cougars. Explains in detail. Remarks the voters have spoken on this particular issue.  

098

Chair Ringo

Makes comments.

101

Sen. Nelson

Remarks on cruelty to animals.

108

Beckstead

Appreciates comments. Responds to Sen. Nelson’s remarks.

115

Rep. Boquist

Comments on an increase in the length of the hunting season.

124

Beckstead

Emphasizes he is not a biologist. Remarks that if there is a problem, the issue should be addressed on the ballot.

129

Rep. Roblan

Discusses the number of counties that voted and did not vote for Measure 18 or Measure 34. Refers to submitted material. Asks witness to comment.

140

Beckstead

Responds.

162

Rep. Boquist

Remarks state wildlife is presently managed. Relates personal experiences with cougars. Expresses support for SB 389B. States that he does not hunt. Remarks on ethical issues. Believes some of the testimony to be marginal.

192

Beckstead

Appreciates Rep. Boquist’s comments. States that if there are any animals causing problems, they should be taken care of under the law. Believes the individual problems will not be solved by allowing the use of hounds. Believes it will not have any impact. Suggests that cougar biologists will say it would have an adverse affect. Explains in detail.

217

Chair Ringo

Asks if there are any of the mentioned biologists in the room.

218

Beckstead

Replies he does not know.

224

Sen. Bates

States that he wants to refocus this discussion. Remarks this is not about trophy hunting or hunting of cougars, but is about public safety. Adds that it is about the divide between rural and urban areas. Relates particular concerns and questions regarding controlling the population of cougars.

234

Sally Mackel

Sierra Club of Oregon. Points out Oregon is a rural state.

243

Chair Ringo

Recesses the meeting at 6:52 p.m. and the committee stands at ease. Calls the meeting back to order at 7:10 p.m.

244

Chair Ringo

Asks Ms. Mackel where she is from.

248

Mackel

Replies Jackson County.

250

Mackel

Discusses creating a balance between protecting wildlife and human safety. Suggests committee look to science to answer the questions that are before the committee. Explains opposition to the –A5 amendments. Provides statistics from Dr. Paul Beier.

279

Chair Ringo

Verifies the statistics are from Paul Beier.

280

Mackel

Confirms this.

281

Chair Ringo

Asks who he is.

282

Mackel

Replies he is the leading authority on cougar/human conflicts.

283

Chair Ringo

Asks where he lives.

284

Mackel

Explains most of his studies were done in California, but he lives in Arizona.

285

Chair Ringo

Asks if he can be contacted by phone.

286

Mackel

Replies that if not, then Rick Hopkins can be contacted by phone. Explains he is another well known and well researched cougar biologist. Continues testimony in opposition to using hounds to hunt cougars.

303

Chair Ringo

Asks if witness has an excerpt from Beier’s analysis.

304

Mackel

Replies yes. Submits informational packet (EXHIBIT G). Testifies in opposition to the –A5 amendments.

313

Rep. P. Smith

Mentions witness keeps referring to the -A5 amenmdents. States those were defeated in the Senate and that is why they are in conference committee.

316

Chair Ringo

Replies correct. Discusses purposes for holding a public hearing on this issue.

325

Mackel

Explains she will continue talking about it because the –A5 amendments bring back the concept of using hounds to hunt cougars. Continues testimony in opposition to the –A5 amendments.

335

Chair Ringo

Reminds witness this hearing is about cougars.

339

Mackel

Discusses cougar management changes. Discusses using hounds to hunt cougars for sport. Refers to quotes given by Paul Beier in the submitted testimony. Continues testimony regarding opposition to using hounds to hunt cougars.

384

Mackel

Discusses opposition to further study of cougars addressed in the –B6 amendments.

436

Mackel

Explains portion of –B6 amendments which the Safari Club can support.

TAPE 3, A

012

Mackel

Comments on the process of receiving and logging complaints.

054

Noah Greenwald

Conservation Biologist, Center for Biological Diversity. Provides information on his background. Remarks on the –B6 amendments. Discusses the standard method for a population density study. Mentions testimony made by ODFW on the ongoing study in northeast Oregon. Believes conclusions made are premature. Comments that it was not clear if the number of calves being killed was the limiting factor for the elk population.

082

Chair Ringo

Says he asked if there were any other factors and that the ODFW believed there were not.

086

Greenwald

Discusses different factors in population trend.

110

Greenwald

Discusses Dr. Paul Beier’s work. Suggests the committee contact Dr. Beier. Provides information on Dr. Beier’s background.

140

Greenwald

Discusses elk populations and predator/prey relationships. Expresses belief that it is not necessary to kill cougars in order to save elk.

152

Chair Ringo

Verifies that witness does not dispute whether the lion population influences the elk population.

153

Greenwald

Confirms this. States that whether or not it is influencing it in a negative way is another question. Believes that would be hard to show. Discusses deer populations in other parts of the country.

167

Catherine Koehn

Retired Teacher. Past Director, Northwest Cougar Action Trust. Resident, rural Lane County. Testifies in opposition to allowing the use of hounds to hunt cougars.

250

Koehn

Continues testimony.

335

Brenna Bell

Resident, Portland. Explains she was an attorney on the case that Mr. Anglin mentioned in his testimony. Explains the lawsuit brought against the ODFW study. Notes the testimony at today’s hearing has been regarding the general approach to cougar management. Discusses the results of approving the –B6 amendments. Submits and discusses newspaper articles (EXHIBIT H).

TAPE 4, A

011

Chair Ringo

Points out the study was found to be illegal because ODFW was using federal dollars and that required them to meet certain requirements. States it was illegal in that sense, it doesn’t mean it was a bad idea.

013

Bell

Clarifies the judge said there was not enough information to determine what the impact would be. Discusses other dangers presented in everyday life.

029

Amy Atwood

Resident, Eugene. Environmental Attorney. Discusses cougars in the state of Oregon. Discusses the logic of the arguments that have been presented in testimony today.  

054

Barbara Wilson

Resident, Beaverton. Comments on testimony of Andrew Wile. Comments on testimony of Dennis Reynolds. Notes there were no attacks in all of those encounters. Relates personal experience with cougars. Wonders what the human annual mortality rate is from cougars.

085

Sen. Nelson

Replies 16 in the last 120 years.

086

Wilson

Wonders if that is in Oregon.

087

Sen. Nelson

Replies he does not know.

088

Wilson

Comments on Measure 18.

105

Sen. Bates

Asks if ODFW believes they have sufficient information in certain areas of Oregon to determine what an appropriate size is for the cougar population. Wonders if ODFW needs more information before they can make those recommendations.

111

Anglin

Explains they have information for certain areas to make those recommendations. Discusses the process of the adoption of management objectives.

120

Chair Ringo

Wonders about comments made that hunters only hunt large, mature males and leave the juveniles which generally cause the problems.

123

Anglin

Provides background information on the hunting of cougars.

131

Chair Ringo

Wonders if the hunting of the mature males would have a noticeable improvement on public safety if hunting using dogs was to be reinstituted.

135

Anglin

Responds.

141

Chair Ringo

Wonders if the male and female cougars would be harvested equally if hunting were reinstituted.

144

Anglin

Believes initially a large proportion of females would be hunted along with males. Believes over time males would be harvested more.  

149

Chair Ringo

Asks if witness believes Dr. Paul Beier is a reputable scientist.

150

Anglin

Replies yes. Explains connections with Dr. Paul Beier.

153

Rep. Roblan

Remarks this bill would only add one more way to hunt. Asks question regarding territory.

162

Anglin

Responds.  

167

Rep. Burley

Discusses figures in submitted material. Comments on using dogs to hunt cougars. Believes most of the hunting of cougars that occurs currently is purely coincidental. Asks if there was an attack during the last hunting season.

208

Anglin

Replies there was an individual in the John Day area that appeared to be attacked by a cougar. Explains the state police and the ODFW both investigated the incident and found no reason to believe that he was not attacked by a cougar. Adds that it was not 100% conclusive, but it appeared that he was.

217

Sen. Bates

Mentions that witness said they had enough information in certain areas of the state to determine appropriate population of cougars in that area. Wonders if the ODFW would be able to then set the amount of harvest and achieve that harvest in the specified area without the use of dogs.

229

Anglin

Replies they could set the harvest level. Explains they would attempt to use the legal hunting methods in order to bring the population down to the determined population level. Replies it is doubtful they would be successful in achieving that level.

239

Sen. Bates

Verifies they wouldn’t be able to achieve the population level unless they used dogs.

240

Anglin

Replies that without the use of dogs it is doubtful they would be able to achieve the determined population level.

241

Sen. Bates

States his position on this issue.

272

Sen. Nelson

Comments on general elections.

287

Rep. P. Smith

Asks Chair Ringo to consider the –B7 amendments. Submits informational packet (EXHIBIT I).

290

Rep. Boquist

Submits and explains the –B7 amendments (EXHIBIT J). Mentions HB 2759 (2005).

335

Rep. Boquist

Submits and summarizes article from the Molalla Pioneer (EXHIBIT K).

356

Chair Ringo

Thanks everyone for their testimony. Makes closing remarks. Closes the work session on SB 389B and adjourns the meeting at 8:13 p.m.

 

 

EXHIBIT SUMMARY

 

A.     SB 389B, -B6 amendments, staff, 2 pp

B.     SB 389B, ORS excerpt, staff, 1 p

C.     SB 389B, written testimony, Ron Anglin, 2 pp

D.    SB 398B, PowerPoint presentation, Ron Anglin, 2 pp

E.     SB 398B, committee tape log, Rep. Brian Boquist, 7 pp

F.      SB 398B, written testimony Paul Phillips, 2 pp

G.    SB 398B, informational packet, Sally Mackel, 19 pp

H.    SB 398B, newspaper articles, Brenna Bell, 6 pp

I.       SB 398B, informational packet, Rep. Patti Smith, 28 pp

J.      SB 398B, -B7 amendments, Rep. Brian Boquist, 1 p

K.    SB 398B, article, Rep. Brian Boquist, 1 p