SENATE COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AND WORKFORCE

 

 

January 19, 2005                                                                                                     Hearing Room D

3:00 P.M.                                                                                                                        Tapes  4  - 6

                                                                                                                           (Corrected 4-21-05)

 

MEMBERS PRESENT:         Sen. Vicki Walker, Chair

Sen. Charles Starr, Vice-Chair

Sen. Ryan Deckert

Sen. Bill Morrisette

 

MEMBER EXCUSED:          Sen. Jeff Kruse

 

STAFF PRESENT:                 Marjorie Taylor, Committee Administrator

Dawn Tuso, Committee Assistant

 

MEASURES/ISSUES HEARD:        

                                                Chalkboard Project – Informational Meeting

Oregon’s Demographics – Informational Meeting

Cultural Competency – Informational Meeting                    

 

These minutes are in compliance with Senate and House Rules.  Only text enclosed in quotation marks reports a speaker’s exact words.  For complete contents, please refer to the tapes.

 

TAPE/#

Speaker

Comments

TAPE 4 , A

005

Chair Walker

Calls meeting to order at 3:02 p.m.

010

Chair Walker

Acknowledges special guest, Khosrow Fatemi, President, Eastern Oregon University.

THE CHALKBOARD PROJECT - INFORMATIONAL MEETING

015

Chair Walker

Introduces agenda items. Opens Informational meeting on the Chalkboard Project. Introduces Sue Hildick.

020

Sue Hildick

President, Foundations for a Better Oregon and Chalkboard Project. Introduces herself and one of her partners,  Adam Davis.

025

Hildick

Introduces Foundations for a Better Oregon and submits a progress report regarding the chalkboard project (EXHIBIT A).

045

Hildick

Mentions the five partner founding foundations that came together to form  Foundations for a Better Oregon.

055

Hildick

States that the chalkboard project is about helping Oregon define a new vision for K-12 public education. Reports the three pieces that it is framed around:

  • Discussion about the quality of education
  • The accountability of the system
  • How do we fund it

070

Hildick

Offers a snapshot of their process. The First part including:

  • Discovery Process
  • Public opinion research
  • Values and Beliefs Survey: Quality, Accountability, and Finance
  • Over thirty focus groups from a variety of backgrounds
  • Two questions asked of those groups: What are your top concerns and what do you think works that should be looked at as a best practice

080

Hildick

Introduces the second part of the  process:

  • Broad review of educational practices
  • Worked with EcoNW and the University of Oregon to do a survey.

Reports that the results are complete and available online at their website.

090

Hildick

Introduces the third part of the process:

·         Sharing what we are learning

·         Public awareness campaign to reach the general public

·         Simple tools on website

·         Media

·         Editorial board

105

Hildick

Introduces the fourth  part of the process as being a public engagement dialog.

110

Hildick

Mentions the top five barriers to successful schools.

130

Hildick

States that it is a grass roots initiative.

135

Hildick

Announces that they have received excellent feedback so far.

140

Hildick

Mentions that they would like to come back to the committee in March, to present a preview of what has been found. States that their final report should be complete in May.

145

Hildick

States that the Chalkboard Project can be looked at as a catalyst for long term change.

150

Adam Davis

Mentions the focus groups used for the Chalkboard Project.

165

Davis

Introduces the sample design. Discusses the survey in detail.

·         What Oregonians want

·         Oregon’s Education System

·         How well Oregon schools are doing

·         Regional differences in perceptions

210

Sen. Deckert

Asks if it is universal across the counties where people would rate their local schools very high.

215

Davis

Answers yes and explains in detail. Discusses the differences between regions in terms of perceptions of how well schools are doing.

235

Davis

Discusses, in addition to educating students, why we need strong schools.

  • Reducing crime and social problems
  • Teaching kids the basics of citizenship
  • Keeping families in the community
  • Benefiting the economy in the long run
  • Being a community center for the town
  • Improving residential property values

260

Davis

Recites a comment made by one of their focus group participants.

270

Sen. Morrisette

Expresses that teaching kids about citizenship and civics has not been included in the curriculum but should be. Notes that  help is needed with confronting the issue.

295

Davis

Agrees that it is an important issue.

310

Davis

Discusses ideas of what is important in terms of deciding when to graduate students.

325

Davis

Highlights the valued skills and subjects. States that Oregonians want the basics:

  • ability to do addition, subtraction, multiplication, division
  • Strong reading, writing, speaking skills

345

Davis

Stresses closing the achievement gap.

355

Davis

Discusses the perceived obstacles to local K-12 public school’s success:

  • Not enough direct parental support
  • Lack of stable and adequate funding
  • Not attracting/retaining highly qualified teachers
  • Unfunded federal mandates
  • Central administration waste and inefficiency

380

Sen. C. Starr

Addresses the issue of not attracting or retaining  highly qualified teachers.  Asks if the issue has been explored.

390

Davis

Emphasizes that Oregonians have an incredible amount of respect for teachers. States that it does raise certain questions regarding how to go about hiring and training teachers.

TAPE 5, A

005

Sen. Deckert

Refers to (EXHIBIT A). Asks if they were open ended questions or prompted responses.

010

Davis

Replies in detail.

015

Davis

Comments on the findings regarding Oregonians being split on whether schools need more money.

030

Davis

Expresses the need for the Chalkboard Project. Emphasizes the percent of Oregonians who want to get involved.

060

Chair Walker

Asks how the foundation works with  the Quality Education Commission.

061

Hildick

Answers and explains in detail.

065

Chair Walker

Asks if the foundation is using the Quality Education Commission’s $7.1 billion figure needed to fund education.

068

Hildick

Replies no. Explains.

070

Chair Walker

Asserts that quality and accountability need to be focused on first and then we can talk about the long term goal.

075

Hildick

Comments that the focus group was asked about the Quality Education Model.

085

Sen. Morrisette

Asks if  the value of kindergarten specifically ever came up in discussion.

090

Davis

Replies, yes. Explains in detail.

110

Sen. Morrisette

Clarifies his question regarding the idea of half day kindergarten. Expresses that he would like to see it be mandatory.

130

Chair Walker

Closes  segment. Opens segment on Oregon’s demographics. Introduces Richard Bjelland and Bob Repine.

OREGON’S DEMOGRAPHICS - INFORMATIONAL MEETING

135

Bob Repine

Director, Housing and Community Services. Introduces himself. Gives background of the framework of how the report came about. Talks about the study that was done on the demographics in Oregon. Gives an overview of the past, present, and future. Discusses why the study was done. Introduces topics mentioned in study.

190

Richard Bjelland

State Housing Analyst. Introduces himself.  Introduces the study done on demographics and submits study for the record (EXHIBIT B).

205

Bjelland

Announces that the demographics of Oregon are changing very fast.

210

Bjelland

Addresses some presentation definitions.

225

Bjelland

Discusses demographics:

  • Hispanics as a percent of the race in the U.S.
  • Projected household growth
  • Source of population growth
  • Regional standpoint for population growth
  • Hispanic regional population
  • California’s population change
  • Oregon’s minority population
  • Oregon population by ethnicity
  • Salem,  Marion county, Woodburn population by ethnicity
  • Woodburn school district students

 

300

Bjelland

Continues discussing demographics:

  • California demographics
  • Multnomah County’s population by ethnicity
  • Gresham’s population by ethnicity
  • Percent increase in population
  • Growth rate of Oregon’s population
  • Growth rate of Marion County’s population

400

Bjelland

Continues discussing demographics:

  • Oregon growth rate
  • Percent of foreign born
  • Percent of foreign born by region
  • Legal status of foreign born
  • Percent of foreign born by period
  • Resident births and deaths in Oregon

TAPE 4, B

005

Bjelland

Continues discussion:

  • Oregon’s Counties who lost population
  • Census 2000-Oregon
  • Source of Oregon’s population growth
  • Marion County’s population growth
  • Age and sex distribution of the population
  • Age and sex distribution of the population  by race
  • Age and sex distribution of the population  for Hispanic population
  • Age and sex by nativity: 2000
  • Share of Hispanic population
  • Educational attainment for Hispanics aged 25-64, by generation
  • Full-time worker 1999 earnings by race, ethnicity and educational attainment
  • Tax liability comparison of medium income households
  • Oregon households percentage by type 1960-2000
  • Household types as a percent of Oregon household growth

130

Bjelland

Summarizes and concludes.

135

Sen. Morrisette

Raises question regarding the balance of citizen Hispanics and non citizen Hispanics.

145

Bjelland

Replies. Explains in detail.

150

Sen. Morrisette

Comments on the question regarding whether or not they are eligible for services.

160

Bjelland

Recognizes that it highlights the importance of the issue.

170

Chair Walker

Notices that the increase has been mostly with the Hispanic population. Asks if  the African American and Asian populations have been growing at a much slower rate.

175

Bjelland

Replies that the African American population has been very stable and that the Asian population is growing rapidly.

180

Chair Walker

Asks if a good percentage of the in-migration is coming from California.

185

Bjelland

Replies, yes. Explains.

190

Chair Walker

Closes segment. Opens segment on Cultural Competency.

CULTURAL COMPETENCY IN SCHOOLS - INFORMATIONAL MEETING

195

Chair Walker

Introduces Pat Burk and Charlie Benitez from the Department of Education, Yvette Weber-Davis from Oregon University System and Joyce Harris from the NW Regional Educational Laboratory.

225

Pat Burk

Chief Policy Officer for the Department of Education. Introduces himself. Introduces presentation topics. Submits informational packet (EXHIBIT C).

245

Burk

Discusses:

3rd grade Reading:

  • Academic achievement in Reading is increasing
  • The Difference by race and ethnicity is closing over time
  • A gap still exists

10th grade Reading: 

  • Flattening of scores over time
  • The gap continues to appear and increases in some cases

Presents the definition of the achievement gap:

  • Persistent level of underachievement for students of color, students in poverty, and students of whom English is their second language

Need to focus on three things:

  • Need to fix the system itself
  • Identify effective programs and strategies
  • Need to bring more partners into the work

Discusses what they are doing to work on fixing the problem.

340

Burk

Introduces the literacy initiative.

345

Burk

Publicly recognizes Sen. C. Starr for his service on the Literacy Leadership Committee.

355

Burk

Mentions a high school initiative where they have identified  six demonstration sites that are working on incorporating secondary literacy.

370

Burk

Discusses assessment tools being used in both Spanish and Russian. Mentions the concept of reading assessments in Spanish.

380

Burk

Explains the English language proficiencies that have been developed specifically for students of whom English is not their native language.

400

Burk

Discusses developing a common statewide English proficiency assessment tool.

410

Burk

States that they have a partnership with the government of Mexico. Explains.

420

Burk

Describes working with the Education Service Districts to create eighteen community plazas throughout the state where planning will be taking place.

425

Burk

Discusses Native American issues initiative.

430

Burk

Mentions engagement in public recognition for schools that are making progress. Discusses the development of partnerships. Highlights the work that has been done within the University community.

TAPE 5, B

005

Burk

Reports the Teacher Standards and Practices Commission’s involvement in respect to dealing with the issue of cultural competency.

020

Burk

Discusses cultural competence briefly.

030

Burk

Explains research in detail:

  • Minority student enrollment has steadily increased from 1992 to the present
  • Latino student enrollment has increased by 171%
  • Dramatic increase in the diversity of Oregon students
  • 23% of Oregon students are identified as minority group members
  • 4.7% of the teaching workforce are identified as minority group members

Three key areas of cultural competence:

  • creating an environment in our schools and districts in which all students and families feel welcome, respected, and valued for who they are
  • Need to prepare teachers and administrators to work effectively in a multicultural environment and classroom
  • Need to better diversify our workforce

040

Burk

Discusses the proceedings from the first multi-cultural  summit that was held in May of 2004. Mentions the relevant statutes established and the requirements of the Oregon Department of Education and the Oregon Department of Higher Education.

065

Burk

Comments on an established Cultural Competence Charter Group.

070

Burk

Introduces definition of cultural competence.

090

Burk

Announces that the state has secured a  grant to focus on cultural competency issues.

095

Burk

Discusses the most recent actions of the statewide initiative on cultural competence.

100

Burk

Mentions the State Action for Education Leadership Project (SAELP)demonstration districts.

105

Burk

States that they continue to work with many advocacy groups.

110

Burk

Highlights the work of the Oregon Association of Colleges of Teacher Education (OACTE) which has just published a summary of the steps it plans to take in confronting cultural competence.

120

Burk

Lists the challenges:

  • Need to improve the level of community engagement
  • Need to better prepare schools to address the needs

125

Burk

Introduces Charlie Benitez.

130

Charlie Benitez

Education Specialist, Oregon Department of Education. Introduces himself and submits written testimony (EXHIBIT D).

140

Benitez

Introduces four conferences that they provide multi-cultural workshops for:

  • Violence Prevention Summer Institute
  • Oregon Association of Compensatory Education
  • Achievement Gap Conference
  • The Overrepresentation of Minority Youth in the Juvenile Justice System

170

Benitez

Mentions other types of trainings and workshops.

180

Benitez

Discusses the creation of a multi-cultural education resource directory which is available on their website.

185

Benitez

Informs of a teacher exchange program.

195

Chair Walker

Asks, what we are doing to keep children of immigrant descent in school in Oregon.

200

Burk

Explains. 

230

Chair Walker

Asks, what  the department has done to recruit, retain, and promote its own diverse workforce.

235

Burk

Explains that their staff has not been growing and that there is limited space to add members to their workforce, but that they have aggressively publicized vacancies. Notes that they do have a lot of room to grow in that area, however.

260

Chair Walker

Asks if the information being gathered about the students is kept confidential.

265

Burk

Confirms that it does remain confidential.

290

Chair Walker

Introduces Yvette Webber-Davis and Joyce Harris.

310

Yvette Webber-Davis

Oregon University System, Director of Diversity Planning and Special Projects. Introduces herself.

335

Webber-Davis

Introduces the Cultural Competence Summit. Submits and explains in detail information submitted for the record (EXHIBIT E).

385

Webber-Davis

Introduces discussion on:

  • Assessment and accountability
  • Curriculum and faculty development opportunities
  • Recruitment and retention activities
  • University and school partnerships
  • Preliminary policy implications and next steps

States that the outcome was the need for more partnerships.

TAPE 6, A

005

Webber-Davis

Discusses  town hall forum. Mentions conversation about educational achievement.

025

Webber-Davis

Mentions poster session descriptions.

035

Webber-Davis

Discusses the next steps:

  • Enhanced assessment measures
  • Enhanced research initiatives
  • Enhanced partnership efforts

065

Webber-Davis

Continues to discuss the next steps.

080

Webber-Davis

Mentions that the OACTE group has established a taskforce to focus on confronting the issue of cultural competence.

090

Webber-Davis

Asserts that the efforts are appropriate and very timely and that it comes down to leadership.

100

Chair Walker

Introduces Joyce Harris.

105

Joyce Harris

Director of the Equity Center, NW Regional Laboratory. Introduces herself. Explains her program.

120

Harris

Submits and discusses report on the cultural competency of schools and teachers in relation to student success (EXHIBIT F).

125

Harris

Stresses the question of what the impact is.

135

Harris

Mentions the training model that they use.

140

Harris

Introduces the English language proficiency standards.

175

Harris

Refers to how it feels when a person is not able to understand or speak the language spoken. Mentions the silent period and the effective filter.

185

Harris

Mentions cultural bridges. Points out what teachers understand and how they use verbal and nonverbal communication styles of other cultures in the classroom.

210

Harris

States that the notion of cultural competency rests on us seeing culture and strategies that are built on cultural knowledge as a way to effectively engage students.

220

Harris

Raises the question of how we can use what we know about the culture of the groups we interact with as a way to enhance the work that we do.

265

Harris

Mentions a publication coming out called Cultural Competence.

275

Sen. C. Starr

Comments that, as we become more diverse in our population, it is important not to lose sight of the fact that we have an American Culture, and that we need to continue to integrate the populations that are coming to us, into the American Culture. Offers his personal experience with cultural competency.

330

Harris

States that American culture is really everything that we have had and, as a nation, we have only really had problems when we have rejected other cultures.

345

Chair Walker

Closes informational meeting. Adjourns the meeting at 5:20 p.m.

 

 

EXHIBIT SUMMARY

 

  1. Chalkboard Project, Informational Packet, Sue Hildick, 62 pp
  2. Demographics and Oregon: Past, Present, and Future, Richard Bjelland, 36 pp
  3. Cultural Competency, Informational Packet, Pat Burk and Charlie Benitez, 107 pp

D.    Cultural Competency, written testimony, Charlie Benitez, 1 p

E.     Cultural Competency, written testimony, Yvette Weber-Davis, 11 pp

F.      Cultural Competency, Resources, Joyce Harris, 16 pp