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Oregon Bulletin

February 1, 2012

 

Land Conservation and Development Department
Chapter 660

Rule Caption: Amend the administrative rule establishing a process for assessing agricultural land capability.

Adm. Order No.: LCDD 10-2011

Filed with Sec. of State: 12-20-2011

Certified to be Effective: 12-20-11

Notice Publication Date: 9-1-2011

Rules Amended: 660-033-0030

Subject: Amendment implements legislative authorization for a person to obtain information for use in the determination of whether land qualifies as agricultural land by requiring professional certification of soil assessment consultants.

Rules Coordinator: Casaria Tuttle—(503) 373-0050, ext. 322

660-033-0030

Identifying Agricultural Land

(1) All land defined as “agricultural land” in OAR 660-033-0020(1) shall be inventoried as agricultural land.

(2) When a jurisdiction determines the predominant soil capability classification of a lot or parcel it need only look to the land within the lot or parcel being inventoried. However, whether land is “suitable for farm use” requires an inquiry into factors beyond the mere identification of scientific soil classifications. The factors are listed in the definition of agricultural land set forth at OAR 660-033-0020(1)(a)(B). This inquiry requires the consideration of conditions existing outside the lot or parcel being inventoried. Even if a lot or parcel is not predominantly Class I-IV soils or suitable for farm use, Goal 3 nonetheless defines as agricultural “lands in other classes which are necessary to permit farm practices to be undertaken on adjacent or nearby lands.” A determination that a lot or parcel is not agricultural land requires findings supported by substantial evidence that addresses each of the factors set forth in OAR 660-033-0020(1).

(3) Goal 3 attaches no significance to the ownership of a lot or parcel when determining whether it is agricultural land. Nearby or adjacent land, regardless of ownership, shall be examined to the extent that a lot or parcel is either “suitable for farm use” or “necessary to permit farm practices to be undertaken on adjacent or nearby lands” outside the lot or parcel.

(4) When inventoried land satisfies the definition requirements of both agricultural land and forest land, an exception is not required to show why one resource designation is chosen over another. The plan need only document the factors that were used to select an agricultural, forest, agricultural/forest, or other appropriate designation.

(5)(a) More detailed data on soil capability than is contained in the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) soil maps and soil surveys may be used to define agricultural land. However, the more detailed soils data shall be related to the NRCS land capability classification system.

(b) If a person concludes that more detailed soils information than that contained in the Internet soil survey of soil data and information produced by the National Cooperative Soil Survey operated by the NRCS of the USDA as of January 2, 2012, would assist a county to make a better determination of whether land qualifies as agricultural land, the person must request that the department arrange for an assessment of the capability of the land by a professional soil classifier who is chosen by the person, using the process described in section (9) of this rule.

(c) This section and section (9) of this rule apply to:

(A) A change to the designation of land planned and zoned for exclusive farm use, forest use or mixed farm-forest use to a non-resource plan designation and zone on the basis that such land is not agricultural land; and

(B) Excepting land use decisions under section (7) of this rule, any other proposed land use decision in which more detailed data is used to demonstrate that land planned and zoned for exclusive farm use does not meet the definition of agricultural land under OAR 660-033-0020(1)(a)(A).

(d) This section and section (9) of this rule implement Oregon Laws 2010, chapter 44, section 1, effective on October 1, 2011. After this date, only those soils assessments certified by the department under section (9) of this rule may be considered by local governments in land use proceedings described in subsection (c) of this section. However, a local government may consider soils assessments that have been completed and submitted prior to October 1, 2011.

(e) This section and section (9) of this rule authorize a person to obtain additional information for use in the determination of whether land qualifies as agricultural land, but do not otherwise affect the process by which a county determines whether land qualifies as agricultural land as defined by Goal 3 and OAR 660-033-0020.

(6) Any county that adopted marginal lands provisions before January 1, 1993, may continue to designate lands as “marginal lands” according to those provisions and criteria in former ORS 197.247 (1991), as long as the county has not applied the provisions of ORS 215.705 to 215.750 to lands zoned for exclusive farm use.

(7)(a) For the purposes of approving a land use application on high-value farmland under ORS 215.705, the county may change the soil class, soil rating or other soil designation of a specific lot or parcel if the property owner:

(A) Submits a statement of agreement from the NRCS that the soil class, soil rating or other soil designation should be adjusted based on new information; or

(B) Submits a report from a soils scientist whose credentials are acceptable to the Oregon Department of Agriculture that the soil class, soil rating or other soil designation should be changed; and

(C) Submits a statement from the Oregon Department of Agriculture that the Director of Agriculture or the director’s designee has reviewed the report described in subsection (7)(B) of this section and finds the analysis in the report to be soundly and scientifically based.

(b) Soil classes, soil ratings or other soil designations used in or made pursuant to this section are those of the NRCS Internet soil survey for that class, rating or designation before November 4, 1993, except for changes made pursuant to subsection (a) of this section.

(9) For the purposes of approving a land use application on high-value farmland under OAR 660-033-0090, 660-033-0120, 660-033-0130 and 660-033-0135, soil classes, soil ratings or other soil designations used in or made pursuant to this definition are those of the NRCS Internet survey as of January 2, 2012 for that class, rating or designation.

(9) Soils Assessments by Professional Soil Classifiers.

(a) A “professional soil classifier” means any professional in good standing with the Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) who the SSSA certified to have met its requirements that existed as of October 1, 2011 for:

(A) Certified Professional Soil Classifier; or

(B) Certified Professional Soil Scientist, and who has been determined by an independent panel of soils professionals as defined in subsection (h) of this section to have:

(i) Completed five semester hours in soil genesis, morphology and classification;

(ii) At least five years of field experience in soils classification and mapping that meets National Cooperative Soil Survey standards, as maintained by the NRCS, or three years of field experience if the applicant holds an MS or PhD degree; and

(iii) Demonstrated competence in practicing soils classification and mapping without direct supervision, based on published SSSA standards.

(b) The department will develop, update quarterly and post a list of professional soil classifiers (henceforth ‘soils professionals’) who are qualified to perform soils assessments under this rule.

(A) Qualified soils professionals shall include those individuals who have either met the requirements of paragraph (a)(A) of this section or the requirements of paragraph (a)(B) of this section as determined by a majority vote of an independent panel of soils professionals.

(i) A person must apply to the department for initial inclusion on the list described in subsection (b) of this section.

(ii) Qualified soils professionals must reapply to the department for listing on a biennial basis.

(B) A soils assessment auditing committee as defined in subsection (i) of this section will periodically reevaluate qualifications of soils professionals by auditing soils assessments, considering sample department reviews and field checks as described in subsection (f) of this section and verifying continued good standing of soils professionals with the SSSA.

(i) When reviewing applications for relisting, the department will consider the recommendations of the auditing committee and make final determinations as to the continued qualifications of soils professionals to perform soils assessments under this rule.

(ii) The department will re-approve soils professionals for listing when both audits, sample reviews and field checks reveal a pattern of demonstrated competence in practicing soils classification and mapping consistent with subparagraph (a)(B)(iii) of this section, and the SSSA verifies that the soils professional is in good standing with the SSSA.

(c) A person requesting a soils assessment shall:

(A) Choose a soils professional from the posted list described in subsection (b) of this section:

(B) Privately contract for a soils assessment to be prepared; and

(C) On completion of the soils assessment, submit to the department payment of the non-refundable administrative fee established by the department as provided in statute to meet department costs to administer this section.

(d) On completion of the soils assessment, the selected soils professional shall submit to the department:

(A) A Soils Assessment Submittal Form that includes the property owner’s and soils professional’s authorized signatures and a liability waiver for the department; and

(B) A soils assessment that is soundly and scientifically based and that meets reporting requirements as established by the department.

(e) The department shall deposit fees collected under this rule in the Soils Assessment Fund established under Oregon Laws 2010, chapter 44, section 2.

(f) The department shall review the soils assessment by:

(A) Performing completeness checks for consistency with reporting requirements for all submitted soils assessments; and

(B) Performing sample reviews and field checks for some submitted soils assessments, as follows:

(i) The department shall arrange for a person who meets the qualifications of “professional soil classifier” in subsection (a) of this section to conduct systematic sample reviews and field checks of soils assessments and make recommendations to the department as to whether they are soundly and scientifically based.

(ii) Within 30 days of the receipt of a soils assessment subject to review under this paragraph, the department shall determine whether the soils assessment is soundly and scientifically based. Where soils assessments are determined not to be soundly and scientifically based, the department will provide an opportunity to the soils professional to correct any noted deficiencies. Where noted deficiencies are not corrected to the satisfaction of the department, the department will provide written notification of the noted deficiencies to the soils professional, property owner and person who requested the soils assessment.

(g) A soils assessment produced under this rule is not a public record, as defined in ORS 192.410, unless the person requesting the assessment utilizes the assessment in a land use proceeding. If the person decides to utilize a soils assessment produced under this section in a land use proceeding, the person shall inform the department and consent to the release by the department of certified copies of all assessments produced under this section regarding the land to the local government conducting the land use proceeding. The department may not disclose a soils assessment prior to its utilization in a land use proceeding as described in this rule without written consent of the person paying the fee for the assessment and the property owner.

(A) On receipt of written consent, the department shall release to the local government all soils assessments produced under this rule as well as any department notifications provided under subsection (f) of this section regarding land to which the land use proceeding applies.

(h) As used in this rule, “Independent panel of soils professionals” means a committee of three professionals appointed by the department that, quarterly or as needed, reviews and makes determinations regarding the qualifications of individuals seeking to be listed as soils professionals to perform soils analyses.

(A) Such panel shall consist of:

(i) A member of the SSSA;

(ii) The Oregon State Soil Scientist; and

(iii) An Oregon college or university soils professional.

(B) Panel members shall meet the qualifications of professional soil classifiers as defined in this rule or shall have experience mapping and teaching soil genesis, morphology and classification in a college or university setting.

(C) The department’s farm and forest lands specialist shall serve as staff to the panel.

(D) In reviewing qualifications of applicants with respect to required semester hours of academic study under subparagraph (a)(B)(i) of this section, panel members may adjust for differences in academic calendars.

(i) As used in this rule, “Soils assessment auditing committee” means a group of three professionals that, annually or as needed, reviews and makes recommendations to the department regarding the continuing qualifications of soils professionals to perform soils analyses under this rule.

(A) Committee members shall be appointed by the independent panel of soils professionals and shall meet the qualifications of professional soil classifier as defined in subsection (a) of this section.

(B) The department’s farm and forest lands specialist shall serve as staff to the committee.

(j) As used in this rule, “person” shall have the meaning set forth in ORS 197.015(18).

Stat. Auth.: ORS 197.040

Stats. Implemented: ORS 197.015, 197.040, 197.230, 197.245, 215.203, 215.243 & 215.700 - 215.710

Hist.: LCDC 6-1992, f. 12-10-92, cert. ef. 8-7-93; LCDD 5-2000, f. & cert. ef. 4-24-00; LCDD 3-2008, f. & cert. ef. 4-18-08; LCDD 4-2011, f. & cert. ef. 3-16-11; LCDD 10-2011, f. & cert. ef. 12-20-11

 

Rule Caption: Amend Transportation Planning Rules to simplify, clarify and streamline local plan amendments and rezonings.

Adm. Order No.: LCDD 11-2011

Filed with Sec. of State: 12-30-2011

Certified to be Effective: 1-1-12

Notice Publication Date: 11-1-2011

Rules Amended: 660-012-0005, 660-012-0060

Subject: Three new sections were added to OAR 660-012-0060. Section (11) was added to facilitate economic development by allowing for partial mitigation of the transportation effects of a rezoning (or amendment to a plan or development regulation). Section (10) was added to allow local governments to designate areas where congestion standards will not be applied when evaluating rezonings (or amendments to plans or development regulations). Section (9) was added to exempt a rezoning from the rule if it is consistent with the acknowledged comprehensive map plan designation and with an acknowledged transportation system plan. Existing sections within the rule were amended to clarify the definition of a significant effect to the transportation system and to allow more options for how a local government responds when the rezoning (or amendment to a plan or development regulation) would have a significant effect.

Rules Coordinator: Casaria Tuttle—(503) 373-0050, ext. 322

660-012-0005

Definitions

(1) “Access Management” means measures regulating access to streets, roads and highways from public roads and private driveways. Measures may include but are not limited to restrictions on the siting of interchanges, restrictions on the type and amount of access to roadways, and use of physical controls, such as signals and channelization including raised medians, to reduce impacts of approach road traffic on the main facility.

(2) “Accessway” means a walkway that provides pedestrian and or bicycle passage either between streets or from a street to a building or other destination such as a school, park, or transit stop. Accessways generally include a walkway and additional land on either side of the walkway, often in the form of an easement or right-of-way, to provide clearance and separation between the walkway and adjacent uses. Accessways through parking lots are generally physically separated from adjacent vehicle parking or parallel vehicle traffic by curbs or similar devices and include landscaping, trees and lighting. Where accessways cross driveways, they are generally raised, paved or marked in a manner which provides convenient access for pedestrians.

(3) “Affected Local Government” means a city, county or metropolitan service district that is directly impacted by a proposed transportation facility or improvement.

(4) “Approach Road” means a legally constructed, public or private connection that provides vehicular access either to or from or to and from a highway and an adjoining property.

(5) “At or near a major transit stop”: “At” means a parcel or ownership which is adjacent to or includes a major transit stop generally including portions of such parcels or ownerships that are within 200 feet of a transit stop. “Near” generally means a parcel or ownership that is within 300 feet of a major transit stop. The term “generally” is intended to allow local governments through their plans and ordinances to adopt more specific definitions of these terms considering local needs and circumstances consistent with the overall objective and requirement to provide convenient pedestrian access to transit.

(6) “Committed Transportation Facilities” means those proposed transportation facilities and improvements which are consistent with the acknowledged comprehensive plan and have approved funding for construction in a public facilities plan or the Six-Year Highway or Transportation Improvement Program.

(7) “Demand Management” means actions which are designed to change travel behavior in order to improve performance of transportation facilities and to reduce need for additional road capacity. Methods may include, but are not limited to, the use of alternative modes, ride-sharing and vanpool programs, trip-reduction ordinances, shifting to off-peak periods, and reduced or paid parking.

(8) “Influence area of an interchange” means the area 1,320 feet from an interchange ramp terminal measured on the crossroad away from the mainline.

(9) “Local streets” means streets that are functionally classified as local streets to serve primarily local access to property and circulation within neighborhoods or specific areas. Local streets do not include streets functionally classified as collector or arterials.

(10) “Local Street Standards” include but are not limited to standards for right-of-way, pavement width, travel lanes, parking lanes, curb turning radius, and accessways.

(11) “Major” means, in general, those facilities or developments which, considering the size of the urban or rural area and the range of size, capacity or service level of similar facilities or developments in the area, are either larger than average, serve more than neighborhood needs or have significant land use or traffic impacts on more than the immediate neighborhood:

(a) “Major” as it modifies transit corridors, stops, transfer stations and new transportation facilities means those facilities which are most important to the functioning of the system or which provide a high level, volume or frequency of service;

(b) “Major” as it modifies industrial, institutional and retail development means such developments which are larger than average, serve more than neighborhood needs or which have traffic impacts on more than the immediate neighborhood;

(c) Application of the term “major” will vary from area to area depending upon the scale of transportation improvements, transit facilities and development which occur in the area. A facility considered to be major in a smaller or less densely developed area may, because of the relative significance and impact of the facility or development, not be considered a major facility in a larger or more densely developed area with larger or more intense development or facilities.

(12) “Major transit stop” means:

(a) Existing and planned light rail stations and transit transfer stations, except for temporary facilities;

(b) Other planned stops designated as major transit stops in a transportation system plan and existing stops which:

(A) Have or are planned for an above average frequency of scheduled, fixed-route service when compared to region wide service. In urban areas of 1,000,000 or more population major transit stops are generally located along routes that have or are planned for 20 minute service during the peak hour; and

(B) Are located in a transit oriented development or within 1/4 mile of an area planned and zoned for:

(i) Medium or high density residential development; or

(ii) Intensive commercial or institutional uses within 1/4 mile of subsection (i); or

(iii) Uses likely to generate a relatively high level of transit ridership.

(13) “Metropolitan area” means the local governments that are responsible for adopting local or regional transportation system plans within a metropolitan planning organization (MPO) boundary. This includes cities, counties, and, in the Portland Metropolitan area, Metro.

(14) “Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO)” means an organization located within the State of Oregon and designated by the Governor to coordinate transportation planning in an urbanized area of the state including such designations made subsequent to the adoption of this rule. The Longview-Kelso-Rainier MPO is not considered an MPO for the purposes of this rule.

(15) “Minor transportation improvements” include, but are not limited to, signalization, addition of turn lanes or merge/deceleration lanes on arterial or collector streets, provision of local streets, transportation system management measures, modification of existing interchange facilities within public right of way and design modifications located within an approved corridor. Minor transportation improvements may or may not be listed as planned projects in a TSP where the improvement is otherwise consistent with the TSP. Minor transportation improvements do not include new interchanges; new approach roads within the influence area of an interchange; new intersections on limited access roadways, highways or expressways; new collector or arterial streets, road realignments or addition of travel lanes.

(16) “ODOT” means the Oregon Department of Transportation.

(17) “Parking Spaces” means on and off street spaces designated for automobile parking in areas planned for industrial, commercial, institutional or public uses. The following are not considered parking spaces for the purposes of OAR 660-012-0045(5)(c): park and ride lots, handicapped parking, and parking spaces for carpools and vanpools.

(18) “Pedestrian connection” means a continuous, unobstructed, reasonably direct route between two points that is intended and suitable for pedestrian use. Pedestrian connections include but are not limited to sidewalks, walkways, accessways, stairways and pedestrian bridges. On developed parcels, pedestrian connections are generally hard surfaced. In parks and natural areas, pedestrian connections may be soft-surfaced pathways. On undeveloped parcels and parcels intended for redevelopment, pedestrian connections may also include rights of way or easements for future pedestrian improvements.

(19) “Pedestrian district” means a comprehensive plan designation or implementing land use regulations, such as an overlay zone, that establish requirements to provide a safe and convenient pedestrian environment in an area planned for a mix of uses likely to support a relatively high level of pedestrian activity. Such areas include but are not limited to:

(a) Lands planned for a mix of commercial or institutional uses near lands planned for medium to high density housing; or

(b) Areas with a concentration of employment and retail activity; and

(c) Which have or could develop a network of streets and accessways which provide convenient pedestrian circulations.

(20) “Pedestrian plaza” means a small semi-enclosed area usually adjoining a sidewalk or a transit stop which provides a place for pedestrians to sit, stand or rest. They are usually paved with concrete, pavers, bricks or similar material and include seating, pedestrian scale lighting and similar pedestrian improvements. Low walls or planters and landscaping are usually provided to create a semi-enclosed space and to buffer and separate the plaza from adjoining parking lots and vehicle maneuvering areas. Plazas are generally located at a transit stop, building entrance or an intersection and connect directly to adjacent sidewalks, walkways, transit stops and buildings. A plaza including 150–250 square feet would be considered “small.”

(21) “Pedestrian scale” means site and building design elements that are dimensionally less than those intended to accommodate automobile traffic, flow and buffering. Examples include ornamental lighting of limited height; bricks, pavers or other modules of paving with small dimensions; a variety of planting and landscaping materials; arcades or awnings that reduce the height of walls; and signage and signpost details that can only be perceived from a short distance.

(22) “Planning Period” means the twenty-year period beginning with the date of adoption of a TSP to meet the requirements of this rule.

(23) “Preliminary Design” means an engineering design which specifies in detail the location and alignment of a planned transportation facility or improvement.

(24) “Reasonably direct” means either a route that does not deviate unnecessarily from a straight line or a route that does not involve a significant amount of out-of-direction travel for likely users.

(25) “Refinement Plan” means an amendment to the transportation system plan, which resolves, at a systems level, determinations on function, mode or general location which were deferred during transportation system planning because detailed information needed to make those determinations could not reasonably be obtained during that process.

(26) “Regional Transportation Plan” or “RTP” means the long-range transportation plan prepared and adopted by a metropolitan planning organization for a metropolitan area as provided for in federal law.

(27) “Roads” means streets, roads and highways.

(28) “Rural community” means areas defined as resort communities and rural communities in accordance with OAR 660-022-0010(6) and (7). For the purposes of this division, the area need only meet the definitions contained in the Unincorporated Communities Rule although the area may not have been designated as an unincorporated community in accordance with OAR 660-022-0020.

(29) “Transit-Oriented Development (TOD)” means a mix of residential, retail and office uses and a supporting network of roads, bicycle and pedestrian ways focused on a major transit stop designed to support a high level of transit use. The key features of transit oriented development include:

(a) A mixed-use center at the transit stop, oriented principally to transit riders and pedestrian and bicycle travel from the surrounding area;

(b) High density of residential development proximate to the transit stop sufficient to support transit operation and neighborhood commercial uses within the TOD;

(c) A network of roads, and bicycle and pedestrian paths to support high levels of pedestrian access within the TOD and high levels of transit use.

(30) “Transportation Facilities” means any physical facility that moves or assist in the movement of people or goods including facilities identified in OAR 660-012-0020 but excluding electricity, sewage and water systems.

(31) “Transportation System Management Measures” means techniques for increasing the efficiency, safety, capacity or level of service of a transportation facility without increasing its size. Examples include, but are not limited to, traffic signal improvements, traffic control devices including installing medians and parking removal, channelization, access management, ramp metering, and restriping of high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes.

(32) “Transportation Needs” means estimates of the movement of people and goods consistent with acknowledged comprehensive plan and the requirements of this rule. Needs are typically based on projections of future travel demand resulting from a continuation of current trends as modified by policy objectives, including those expressed in Goal 12 and this rule, especially those for avoiding principal reliance on any one mode of transportation.

(33) “Transportation Needs, Local” means needs for movement of people and goods within communities and portions of counties and the need to provide access to local destinations.

(34) “Transportation Needs, Regional” means needs for movement of people and goods between and through communities and accessibility to regional destinations within a metropolitan area, county or associated group of counties.

(35) “Transportation Needs, State” means needs for movement of people and goods between and through regions of the state and between the state and other states.

(36) “Transportation Project Development” means implementing the transportation system plan (TSP) by determining the precise location, alignment, and preliminary design of improvements included in the TSP based on site-specific engineering and environmental studies.

(37) “Transportation Service” means a service for moving people and goods, such as intercity bus service and passenger rail service.

(38) “Transportation System Plan (TSP)” means a plan for one or more transportation facilities that are planned, developed, operated and maintained in a coordinated manner to supply continuity of movement between modes, and within and between geographic and jurisdictional areas.

(39) “Urban Area” means lands within an urban growth boundary, two or more contiguous urban growth boundaries, and urban unincorporated communities as defined by OAR 660-022-0010(9). For the purposes of this division, the area need only meet the definition contained in the Unincorporated Communities Rule although the area may not have been designated as an unincorporated community in accordance with OAR 660-022-0020.

(40) “Urban Fringe” means:

(a) Areas outside the urban growth boundary that are within 5 miles of the urban growth boundary of an MPO area; and

(b) Areas outside the urban growth boundary within 2 miles of the urban growth boundary of an urban area containing a population greater than 25,000.

(41) “Vehicle Miles of Travel (VMT)”: means automobile vehicle miles of travel. Automobiles, for purposes of this definition, include automobiles, light trucks, and other similar vehicles used for movement of people. The definition does not include buses, heavy trucks and trips that involve commercial movement of goods. VMT includes trips with an origin and a destination within the MPO boundary and excludes pass through trips (i.e., trips with a beginning and end point outside of the MPO) and external trips (i.e., trips with a beginning or end point outside of the MPO boundary). VMT is estimated prospectively through the use of metropolitan area transportation models.

(42) “Walkway” means a hard surfaced area intended and suitable for use by pedestrians, including sidewalks and surfaced portions of accessways.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 197.040

Stats. Implemented: ORS 195.012, 197.040, 197.712,197.717 & 197.732

Hist.: LCDC 1-1991, f. & cert. ef. 5-8-91; LCDC 3-1995, f. & cert. ef. 3-31-95; LCDC 4-1995, f. & cert. ef. 5-8-95; LCDD 6-1998, f. & cert. ef. 10-30-98; LCDD 3-2005, f. & cert. ef. 4-11-05; LCDD 6-2006, f. 7-13-06, cert. ef. 7-14-06; LCDD 11-2011, f. 12-30-11, cert. ef. 1-1-12

660-012-0060

Plan and Land Use Regulation Amendments

(1) If an amendment to a functional plan, an acknowledged comprehensive plan, or a land use regulation (including a zoning map) would significantly affect an existing or planned transportation facility, then the local government must put in place measures as provided in section (2) of this rule, unless the amendment is allowed under section (3), (9) or (10) of this rule. A plan or land use regulation amendment significantly affects a transportation facility if it would:

(a) Change the functional classification of an existing or planned transportation facility (exclusive of correction of map errors in an adopted plan);

(b) Change standards implementing a functional classification system; or

(c) Result in any of the effects listed in paragraphs (A) through (C) of this subsection based on projected conditions measured at the end of the planning period identified in the adopted TSP. As part of evaluating projected conditions, the amount of traffic projected to be generated within the area of the amendment may be reduced if the amendment includes an enforceable, ongoing requirement that would demonstrably limit traffic generation, including, but not limited to, transportation demand management. This reduction may diminish or completely eliminate the significant effect of the amendment.

(A) Types or levels of travel or access that are inconsistent with the functional classification of an existing or planned transportation facility;

(B) Degrade the performance of an existing or planned transportation facility such that it would not meet the performance standards identified in the TSP or comprehensive plan; or

(C) Degrade the performance of an existing or planned transportation facility that is otherwise projected to not meet the performance standards identified in the TSP or comprehensive plan.

(2) If a local government determines that there would be a significant effect, then the local government must ensure that allowed land uses are consistent with the identified function, capacity, and performance standards of the facility measured at the end of the planning period identified in the adopted TSP through one or a combination of the remedies listed in (a) through (e) below, unless the amendment meets the balancing test in subsection (2)(e) of this section or qualifies for partial mitigation in section (11) of this rule. A local government using subsection (2)(e), section (3), section (10) or section (11) to approve an amendment recognizes that additional motor vehicle traffic congestion may result and that other facility providers would not be expected to provide additional capacity for motor vehicles in response to this congestion.

(a) Adopting measures that demonstrate allowed land uses are consistent with the planned function, capacity, and performance standards of the transportation facility.

(b) Amending the TSP or comprehensive plan to provide transportation facilities, improvements or services adequate to support the proposed land uses consistent with the requirements of this division; such amendments shall include a funding plan or mechanism consistent with section (4) or include an amendment to the transportation finance plan so that the facility, improvement, or service will be provided by the end of the planning period.

(c) Amending the TSP to modify the planned function, capacity or performance standards of the transportation facility.

(d) Providing other measures as a condition of development or through a development agreement or similar funding method, including, but not limited to, transportation system management measures or minor transportation improvements. Local governments shall, as part of the amendment, specify when measures or improvements provided pursuant to this subsection will be provided.

(e) Providing improvements that would benefit modes other than the significantly affected mode, improvements to facilities other than the significantly affected facility, or improvements at other locations, if the provider of the significantly affected facility provides a written statement that the system-wide benefits are sufficient to balance the significant effect, even though the improvements would not result in consistency for all performance standards.

(3) Notwithstanding sections (1) and (2) of this rule, a local government may approve an amendment that would significantly affect an existing transportation facility without assuring that the allowed land uses are consistent with the function, capacity and performance standards of the facility where:

(a) In the absence of the amendment, planned transportation facilities, improvements and services as set forth in section (4) of this rule would not be adequate to achieve consistency with the identified function, capacity or performance standard for that facility by the end of the planning period identified in the adopted TSP;

(b) Development resulting from the amendment will, at a minimum, mitigate the impacts of the amendment in a manner that avoids further degradation to the performance of the facility by the time of the development through one or a combination of transportation improvements or measures;

(c) The amendment does not involve property located in an interchange area as defined in paragraph (4)(d)(C); and

(d) For affected state highways, ODOT provides a written statement that the proposed funding and timing for the identified mitigation improvements or measures are, at a minimum, sufficient to avoid further degradation to the performance of the affected state highway. However, if a local government provides the appropriate ODOT regional office with written notice of a proposed amendment in a manner that provides ODOT reasonable opportunity to submit a written statement into the record of the local government proceeding, and ODOT does not provide a written statement, then the local government may proceed with applying subsections (a) through (c) of this section.

(4) Determinations under sections (1)–(3) of this rule shall be coordinated with affected transportation facility and service providers and other affected local governments.

(a) In determining whether an amendment has a significant effect on an existing or planned transportation facility under subsection (1)(c) of this rule, local governments shall rely on existing transportation facilities and services and on the planned transportation facilities, improvements and services set forth in subsections (b) and (c) below.

(b) Outside of interstate interchange areas, the following are considered planned facilities, improvements and services:

(A) Transportation facilities, improvements or services that are funded for construction or implementation in the Statewide Transportation Improvement Program or a locally or regionally adopted transportation improvement program or capital improvement plan or program of a transportation service provider.

(B) Transportation facilities, improvements or services that are authorized in a local transportation system plan and for which a funding plan or mechanism is in place or approved. These include, but are not limited to, transportation facilities, improvements or services for which: transportation systems development charge revenues are being collected; a local improvement district or reimbursement district has been established or will be established prior to development; a development agreement has been adopted; or conditions of approval to fund the improvement have been adopted.

(C) Transportation facilities, improvements or services in a metropolitan planning organization (MPO) area that are part of the area’s federally-approved, financially constrained regional transportation system plan.

(D) Improvements to state highways that are included as planned improvements in a regional or local transportation system plan or comprehensive plan when ODOT provides a written statement that the improvements are reasonably likely to be provided by the end of the planning period.

(E) Improvements to regional and local roads, streets or other transportation facilities or services that are included as planned improvements in a regional or local transportation system plan or comprehensive plan when the local government(s) or transportation service provider(s) responsible for the facility, improvement or service provides a written statement that the facility, improvement or service is reasonably likely to be provided by the end of the planning period.

(c) Within interstate interchange areas, the improvements included in (b)(A)–(C) are considered planned facilities, improvements and services, except where:

(A) ODOT provides a written statement that the proposed funding and timing of mitigation measures are sufficient to avoid a significant adverse impact on the Interstate Highway system, then local governments may also rely on the improvements identified in paragraphs (b)(D) and (E) of this section; or

(B) There is an adopted interchange area management plan, then local governments may also rely on the improvements identified in that plan and which are also identified in paragraphs (b)(D) and (E) of this section.

(d) As used in this section and section (3):

(A) Planned interchange means new interchanges and relocation of existing interchanges that are authorized in an adopted transportation system plan or comprehensive plan;

(B) Interstate highway means Interstates 5, 82, 84, 105, 205 and 405; and

(C) Interstate interchange area means:

(i) Property within one-quarter mile of the ramp terminal intersection of an existing or planned interchange on an Interstate Highway; or

(ii) The interchange area as defined in the Interchange Area Management Plan adopted as an amendment to the Oregon Highway Plan.

(e) For purposes of this section, a written statement provided pursuant to paragraphs (b)(D), (b)(E) or (c)(A) provided by ODOT, a local government or transportation facility provider, as appropriate, shall be conclusive in determining whether a transportation facility, improvement or service is a planned transportation facility, improvement or service. In the absence of a written statement, a local government can only rely upon planned transportation facilities, improvements and services identified in paragraphs (b)(A)-(C) to determine whether there is a significant effect that requires application of the remedies in section (2).

(5) The presence of a transportation facility or improvement shall not be a basis for an exception to allow residential, commercial, institutional or industrial development on rural lands under this division or OAR 660-004-0022 and 660-004-0028.

(6) In determining whether proposed land uses would affect or be consistent with planned transportation facilities as provided in sections (1) and (2), local governments shall give full credit for potential reduction in vehicle trips for uses located in mixed-use, pedestrian-friendly centers, and neighborhoods as provided in subsections (a)–(d) below;

(a) Absent adopted local standards or detailed information about the vehicle trip reduction benefits of mixed-use, pedestrian-friendly development, local governments shall assume that uses located within a mixed-use, pedestrian-friendly center, or neighborhood, will generate 10% fewer daily and peak hour trips than are specified in available published estimates, such as those provided by the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) Trip Generation Manual that do not specifically account for the effects of mixed-use, pedestrian-friendly development. The 10% reduction allowed for by this section shall be available only if uses which rely solely on auto trips, such as gas stations, car washes, storage facilities, and motels are prohibited;

(b) Local governments shall use detailed or local information about the trip reduction benefits of mixed-use, pedestrian-friendly development where such information is available and presented to the local government. Local governments may, based on such information, allow reductions greater than the 10% reduction required in subsection (a) above;

(c) Where a local government assumes or estimates lower vehicle trip generation as provided in subsection (a) or (b) above, it shall assure through conditions of approval, site plans, or approval standards that subsequent development approvals support the development of a mixed-use, pedestrian-friendly center or neighborhood and provide for on-site bike and pedestrian connectivity and access to transit as provided for in OAR 660-012-0045(3) and (4). The provision of on-site bike and pedestrian connectivity and access to transit may be accomplished through application of acknowledged ordinance provisions which comply with 660-012-0045(3) and (4) or through conditions of approval or findings adopted with the plan amendment that assure compliance with these rule requirements at the time of development approval; and

(d) The purpose of this section is to provide an incentive for the designation and implementation of pedestrian-friendly, mixed-use centers and neighborhoods by lowering the regulatory barriers to plan amendments which accomplish this type of development. The actual trip reduction benefits of mixed-use, pedestrian-friendly development will vary from case to case and may be somewhat higher or lower than presumed pursuant to subsection (a) above. The Commission concludes that this assumption is warranted given general information about the expected effects of mixed-use, pedestrian-friendly development and its intent to encourage changes to plans and development patterns. Nothing in this section is intended to affect the application of provisions in local plans or ordinances which provide for the calculation or assessment of systems development charges or in preparing conformity determinations required under the federal Clean Air Act.

(7) Amendments to acknowledged comprehensive plans and land use regulations which meet all of the criteria listed in subsections (a)–(c) below shall include an amendment to the comprehensive plan, transportation system plan the adoption of a local street plan, access management plan, future street plan or other binding local transportation plan to provide for on-site alignment of streets or accessways with existing and planned arterial, collector, and local streets surrounding the site as necessary to implement the requirements in OAR 660-012-0020(2)(b) and 660-012-0045(3):

(a) The plan or land use regulation amendment results in designation of two or more acres of land for commercial use;

(b) The local government has not adopted a TSP or local street plan which complies with OAR 660-012-0020(2)(b) or, in the Portland Metropolitan Area, has not complied with Metro’s requirement for street connectivity as contained in Title 6, Section 3 of the Urban Growth Management Functional Plan; and

(c) The proposed amendment would significantly affect a transportation facility as provided in section (1).

(8) A “mixed-use, pedestrian-friendly center or neighborhood” for the purposes of this rule, means:

(a) Any one of the following:

(A) An existing central business district or downtown;

(B) An area designated as a central city, regional center, town center or main street in the Portland Metro 2040 Regional Growth Concept;

(C) An area designated in an acknowledged comprehensive plan as a transit oriented development or a pedestrian district; or

(D) An area designated as a special transportation area as provided for in the Oregon Highway Plan.

(b) An area other than those listed in subsection (a) above which includes or is planned to include the following characteristics:

(A) A concentration of a variety of land uses in a well-defined area, including the following:

(i) Medium to high density residential development (12 or more units per acre);

(ii) Offices or office buildings;

(iii) Retail stores and services;

(iv) Restaurants; and

(v) Public open space or private open space which is available for public use, such as a park or plaza.

(B) Generally include civic or cultural uses;

(C) A core commercial area where multi-story buildings are permitted;

(D) Buildings and building entrances oriented to streets;

(E) Street connections and crossings that make the center safe and conveniently accessible from adjacent areas;

(F) A network of streets and, where appropriate, accessways and major driveways that make it attractive and highly convenient for people to walk between uses within the center or neighborhood, including streets and major driveways within the center with wide sidewalks and other features, including pedestrian-oriented street crossings, street trees, pedestrian-scale lighting and on-street parking;

(G) One or more transit stops (in urban areas with fixed route transit service); and

(H) Limit or do not allow low-intensity or land extensive uses, such as most industrial uses, automobile sales and services, and drive-through services.

(9) Notwithstanding section (1) of this rule, a local government may find that an amendment to a zoning map does not significantly affect an existing or planned transportation facility if all of the following requirements are met.

(a) The proposed zoning is consistent with the existing comprehensive plan map designation and the amendment does not change the comprehensive plan map;

(b) The local government has an acknowledged TSP and the proposed zoning is consistent with the TSP; and

(c) The area subject to the zoning map amendment was not exempted from this rule at the time of an urban growth boundary amendment as permitted in OAR 660-024-0020(1)(d), or the area was exempted from this rule but the local government has a subsequently acknowledged TSP amendment that accounted for urbanization of the area.

(10) Notwithstanding sections (1) and (2) of this rule, a local government may amend a functional plan, a comprehensive plan or a land use regulation without applying performance standards related to motor vehicle traffic congestion (e.g. volume to capacity ratio or V/C), delay or travel time if the amendment meets the requirements of subsection (a) of this section. This section does not exempt a proposed amendment from other transportation performance standards or policies that may apply including, but not limited to, safety for all modes, network connectivity for all modes (e.g. sidewalks, bicycle lanes) and accessibility for freight vehicles of a size and frequency required by the development.

(a) A proposed amendment qualifies for this section if it:

(A) Is a map or text amendment affecting only land entirely within a multimodal mixed-use area (MMA); and

(B) Is consistent with the definition of an MMA and consistent with the function of the MMA as described in the findings designating the MMA.

(b) For the purpose of this rule, “multimodal mixed-use area” or “MMA” means an area:

(A) With a boundary adopted by a local government as provided in subsection (d) or (e) of this section and that has been acknowledged;

(B) Entirely within an urban growth boundary;

(C) With adopted plans and development regulations that allow the uses listed in paragraphs (8)(b)(A) through (C) of this rule and that require new development to be consistent with the characteristics listed in paragraphs (8)(b)(D) through (H) of this rule;

(D) With land use regulations that do not require the provision of off-street parking, or regulations that require lower levels of off-street parking than required in other areas and allow flexibility to meet the parking requirements (e.g. count on-street parking, allow long-term leases, allow shared parking); and

(E) Located in one or more of the categories below:

(i) At least one-quarter mile from any ramp terminal intersection of existing or planned interchanges;

(ii) Within the area of an adopted Interchange Area Management Plan (IAMP) and consistent with the IAMP; or

(iii) Within one-quarter mile of a ramp terminal intersection of an existing or planned interchange if the mainline facility provider has provided written concurrence with the MMA designation as provided in subsection (c) of this section.

(c) When a mainline facility provider reviews an MMA designation as provided in subparagraph (b)(E)(iii) of this section, the provider must consider the factors listed in paragraph (A) of this subsection.

(A) The potential for operational or safety effects to the interchange area and the mainline highway, specifically considering:

(i) Whether the interchange area has a crash rate that is higher than the statewide crash rate for similar facilities;

(ii) Whether the interchange area is in the top ten percent of locations identified by the safety priority index system (SPIS) developed by ODOT; and

(iii) Whether existing or potential future traffic queues on the interchange exit ramps extend onto the mainline highway or the portion of the ramp needed to safely accommodate deceleration.

(B) If there are operational or safety effects as described in paragraph (A) of this subsection, the effects may be addressed by an agreement between the local government and the facility provider regarding traffic management plans favoring traffic movements away from the interchange, particularly those facilitating clearing traffic queues on the interchange exit ramps.

(d) A local government may designate an MMA by adopting an amendment to the comprehensive plan or land use regulations to delineate the boundary following an existing zone, multiple existing zones, an urban renewal area, other existing boundary, or establishing a new boundary. The designation must be accompanied by findings showing how the area meets the definition of an MMA. Designation of an MMA is not subject to the requirements in sections (1) and (2) of this rule.

(e) A local government may designate an MMA on an area where comprehensive plan map designations or land use regulations do not meet the definition, if all of the other elements meet the definition, by concurrently adopting comprehensive plan or land use regulation amendments necessary to meet the definition. Such amendments are not subject to performance standards related to motor vehicle traffic congestion, delay or travel time.

(11) A local government may approve an amendment with partial mitigation as provided in section (2) of this rule if the amendment complies with subsection (a) of this section, the amendment meets the balancing test in subsection (b) of this section, and the local government coordinates as provided in subsection (c) of this section.

(a) The amendment must meet paragraphs (A) and (B) of this subsection or meet paragraph (D) of this subsection.

(A) Create direct benefits in terms of industrial or traded-sector jobs created or retained by limiting uses to industrial or traded-sector industries.

(B) Not allow retail uses, except limited retail incidental to industrial or traded sector development, not to exceed five percent of the net developable area.

(C) For the purpose of this section:

(i) “Industrial” means employment activities generating income from the production, handling or distribution of goods including, but not limited to, manufacturing, assembly, fabrication, processing, storage, logistics, warehousing, importation, distribution and transshipment and research and development.

(ii) “Traded-sector” means industries in which member firms sell their goods or services into markets for which national or international competition exists.

(D) Notwithstanding paragraphs (A) and (B) of this subsection, an amendment complies with subsection (a) if all of the following conditions are met:

(i) The amendment is within a city with a population less than 10,000 and outside of a Metropolitan Planning Organization.

(ii) The amendment would provide land for “Other Employment Use” or “Prime Industrial Land” as those terms are defined in OAR 660-009-0005.

(iii) The amendment is located outside of the Willamette Valley as defined in ORS 215.010.

(E) The provisions of paragraph (D) of this subsection are repealed on January 1, 2017.

(b) A local government may accept partial mitigation only if the local government determines that the benefits outweigh the negative effects on local transportation facilities and the local government receives from the provider of any transportation facility that would be significantly affected written concurrence that the benefits outweigh the negative effects on their transportation facilities. If the amendment significantly affects a state highway, then ODOT must coordinate with the Oregon Business Development Department regarding the economic and job creation benefits of the proposed amendment as defined in subsection (a) of this section. The requirement to obtain concurrence from a provider is satisfied if the local government provides notice as required by subsection (c) of this section and the provider does not respond in writing (either concurring or non-concurring) within forty-five days.

(c) A local government that proposes to use this section must coordinate with Oregon Business Development Department, Department of Land Conservation and Development, area commission on transportation, metropolitan planning organization, and transportation providers and local governments directly impacted by the proposal to allow opportunities for comments on whether the proposed amendment meets the definition of economic development, how it would affect transportation facilities and the adequacy of proposed mitigation. Informal consultation is encouraged throughout the process starting with pre-application meetings. Coordination has the meaning given in ORS 197.015 and Goal 2 and must include notice at least 45 days before the first evidentiary hearing. Notice must include the following:

(A) Proposed amendment.

(B) Proposed mitigating actions from section (2) of this rule.

(C) Analysis and projections of the extent to which the proposed amendment in combination with proposed mitigating actions would fall short of being consistent with the function, capacity, and performance standards of transportation facilities.

(D) Findings showing how the proposed amendment meets the requirements of subsection (a) of this section.

(E) Findings showing that the benefits of the proposed amendment outweigh the negative effects on transportation facilities.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 183 & 197.040

Stats. Implemented: ORS 195.025, 197.040, 197.230, 197.245, 197.610 - 197.625, 197.628 - 197.646, 197.712, 197.717 & 197.732

Hist.: LCDC 1-1991, f. & cert. ef. 5-8-91; LCDD 6-1998, f. & cert. ef. 10-30-98; LCDD 6-1999, f. & cert. ef. 8-6-99; LCDD 3-2005, f. & cert. ef. 4-11-05; LCDD 11-2011, f. 12-30-11, cert. ef. 1-1-12

 

Rule Caption: Temporary rules establishing 35 day notice for amendments to local land use plans and ordinances.

Adm. Order No.: LCDD 12-2011(Temp)

Filed with Sec. of State: 12-30-2011

Certified to be Effective: 1-1-12 thru 5-1-12

Notice Publication Date:

Rules Amended: 660-018-0020, 660-018-0021, 660-018-0022, 660-018-0040

Subject: These temporary rules amend OAR 660-018-0020 through 660-018-0022 and OAR 660-018-0040 in order to establish a 35 day notice period for amendments to local land use plans and ordinances. The current notice period established by the amended rules is 45 days, but that conflicts with statutes that take effect on January 1, 2012. The temporary rules will be in effect until permanent rules are adopted to clarify the notice period.

Rules Coordinator: Casaria Tuttle—(503) 373-0050, ext. 322

660-018-0020

Filing of a Proposed Amendment to or Adop­tion of a Compre­hensive Plan or Land Use Regulation with the Director

(1) A proposal to amend a local government acknowledged comprehensive plan or land use regulation or to adopt a new land use regulation must:

(a) Be submitted to the director at least 35 days before the first evidentiary hearing on adoption.The submittal must be received by the department at its Salem office;

(b) Be accompanied by appropriate forms provided by the department;

(c) Contain two copies of the text and any supplemental information the local government believes is necessary to inform the director as to the effect of the proposal. One of the required copies may be an electronic copy;

(d) Indicate the date of the final hearing on adoption. If a final hearing on adoption is continued or delayed, following proper procedures, the local government is not required to submit a new notice under OAR 660-018-0020.

(e) In the case of a map change, include a map showing the area to be changed as well as the existing and proposed designations. Wherever possible, this map should be on 8-1/2 by 11-inch paper;

(f) Where a goal exception is being proposed, include the proposed language of the exception. The commission urges the local government to submit information that explains the relationship of the proposal to the acknowledged plan and the goals, where applicable.

(2) The text submitted to comply with subsection (1)(c) of this rule must include the specific language being proposed as an addition to or deletion from the acknowledged plan or land use regulations. A general description of the proposal or its purpose is not sufficient. In the case of map changes, the text must include a graphic depiction of the change, and not just a legal description, tax account number, address or other similar general description.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 197.040

Stats. Implemented: ORS 197.610 - 197.625

Hist.: LCDC 14-1981, f. & ef. 12-15-81; LCDC 12-1983, f. & ef. 12-29-83; LCDC 3-1987, f. & ef. 11-12-87; LCDD 3-2000, f. & cert. ef. 2-14-00; LCDD 3-2008, f. & cert. ef. 4-18-08; LCDD 6-2011, f. & cert. ef. 10-20-11; LCDD 12-2011(Temp), f. 12-30-11, cert. ef. 1-1-12 thru 5-1-12

660-018-0021

Submittal of Joint Amendments

Where two or more local governments are required to jointly consider or agree on a comprehensive plan or land use regulation amendment, the local governments shall jointly submit the proposed amendment and adopted action. Notice of jointly proposed amendments must be provided 35 days prior to the first evidentiary hearing. For purposes of notice and appeal, the date of the final decision is the date of the last local government’s adoption.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 197.040

Stats. Implemented: ORS 197.610 - 197.625

Hist.: LCDC 3-1987, f. & ef. 11-12-87; LCDD 3-2000, f. & cert. ef. 2-14-00; LCDD 3-2008, f. & cert. ef. 4-18-08; LCDD 6-2011, f. & cert. ef. 10-20-11; LCDD 12-2011(Temp), f. 12-30-11, cert. ef. 1-1-12 thru 5-1-12

660-018-0022

Exemptions to Filing Requirements Under OAR 660-018-0020

When a local government determines that no goals, commission rules, or land use statutes apply to a particular proposed amendment or new regulation, filing under OAR 660-018-0020 is not required. In addition, a local government may submit an amendment or new regulation with less than 35 days’ notice if the local government determines that there are emergency circumstances requiring expedited review. In both cases:

(1) The amendment or new regulation shall be submitted after adoption as provided in ORS 197.615(1) and (2); and

(2) Notwithstanding the requirements of ORS 197.830(2) to have appeared before the local government in the proceedings concerning the proposal, the director or any other person may appeal the decision to the board under ORS 197.830 to 197.845.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 197.040

Stats. Implemented: ORS 197.610(2)

Hist.: LCDC 12-1983, f. & ef. 12-29-83; LCDC 3-1987, f. & ef. 11-12-87; LCDD 3-2008, f. & cert. ef. 4-18-08; LCDD 6-2011, f. & cert. ef. 10-20-11; LCDD 12-2011(Temp), f. 12-30-11, cert. ef. 1-1-12 thru 5-1-12

660-018-0040

Submittal of Adopted Material

(1) Amendments to acknowledged comprehensive plans or land use regulations, new land use regulations adopted by local government, and findings to support the adoption shall be mailed or otherwise submitted to the director within five working days after the final decision by the governing body and shall be accompanied by appropriate forms provided by the department. If the text and findings are mailed, they shall include a signed statement by the person mailing them indicating the date of deposit in the mail.

(2) Local government must notify the department of withdrawals or denials of proposals previously sent to the department under requirements of OAR 660-018-0020.

(3) The local government must clearly indicate in its transmittal which provisions of ORS 197.610(2) are applicable where the adopted amendment was not submitted for review 35 days prior to the first evidentiary hearing on adoption.

NOTE: ORS 197.610 clearly requires all adopted plan and land use regulation amendments and new land use regulations to be submitted to the director even if they were not required to be submitted for review prior to adoption.

(4) Where amendments or new land use regulations, including supplementary materials, exceed 100 pages, a summary of the amendment briefly describing its purpose and requirements shall be included with the submittal to the director. Such amendments or new land use regulations may be submitted by electronic mail notwithstanding the requirement of OAR 660-018-0020 for at least one paper copy.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 197.040

Stats. Implemented: ORS 197.610 - 197.625

Hist.: LCDC 14-1981, f. & ef. 12-15-81; LCDC 12-1983, f. & ef. 12-29-83; LCDC 3-1987, f. & ef. 11-12-87; LCDD 3-2000, f. & cert. ef. 2-14-00; LCDD 3-2008, f. & cert. ef. 4-18-08; LCDD 6-2011, f. & cert. ef. 10-20-11; LCDD 12-2011(Temp), f. 12-30-11, cert. ef. 1-1-12 thru 5-1-12

Notes
1.) This online version of the OREGON BULLETIN is provided for convenience of reference and enhanced access. The official, record copy of this publication is contained in the original Administrative Orders and Rulemaking Notices filed with the Secretary of State, Archives Division. Discrepancies, if any, are satisfied in favor of the original versions. Use the OAR Revision Cumulative Index found in the Oregon Bulletin to access a numerical list of rulemaking actions after November 15, 2011.

2.) Copyright 2012 Oregon Secretary of State: Terms and Conditions of Use

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