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Oregon Bulletin

July 1, 2012

Department of Environmental Quality, Chapter 340

Rule Caption: Small and mid-size boiler rule amendments.

Adm. Order No.: DEQ 1-2012

Filed with Sec. of State: 5-17-2012

Certified to be Effective: 5-17-12

Notice Publication Date: 8-1-2011

Rules Amended: 340-200-0020, 340-200-0040, 340-210-0100, 340-210-0110, 340-210-0120, 340-210-0250, 340-228-0020, 340-228-0200, 340-228-0210, 340-262-0450, 340-262-0600

Subject: The Heat Smart rules under OAR chapter 340 division 262 prohibit the sale of uncertified biomass boilers and other solid fuel burning devices with maximum heat output capacities below one million British thermal units per hour in Oregon. For small-scale and mid-size commercial, industrial and institutional solid fuel-fired boilers that are not under a DEQ air quality permit but are already subject to federal National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, the rules adopted by the EQC:

 • Provide an exemption from Heat Smart certification requirements if the owner or operator obtains construction approval from DEQ under OAR chapter 340 division 210.

 • Require registration of a boiler with DEQ upon written request. Registration includes confirmation that the boiler complies with existing applicable state visible emissions standards and federal air toxics regulations.

 The exemption from Heat Smart allows small-scale commercial, industrial and institutional biomass boilers already subject to federal National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants to be sold in Oregon while ensuring it meets applicable air quality standards. Registration of a boiler does not authorize its operation like an air quality permit; however, it does provide DEQ with information about the location and compliance status of solid fuel boilers located at facilities that are not required to obtain air emissions permits.

 These amendments, if adopted, will be submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a revision to the State Implementation Plan, which is a requirement of the Clean Air Act.

Rules Coordinator: Maggie Vandehey—(503) 229-6878

340-200-0020

General Air Quality Definitions

As used in divisions 200 through 268, unless specifically defined otherwise:

(1) “Act” or “FCAA” means the Federal Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C.A. 7401 to 7671q.

(2) “Activity” means any process, operation, action, or reaction (e.g., chemical) at a source that emits a regulated pollutant.

(3) “Actual emissions” means the mass emissions of a pollutant from an emissions source during a specified time period.

(a) For determining actual emissions as of the baseline period:

(A) Except as provided in paragraphs (B) and (C) of this subsection and subsection (b) of this section, actual emissions equal the average rate at which the source actually emitted the pollutant during an applicable baseline period and that represents normal source operation;

(B) The Department presumes that the source-specific mass emissions limit included in a source’s permit that was effective on September 8, 1981 is equivalent to the source’s actual emissions during the applicable baseline period if it is within 10% of the actual emissions calculated under paragraph (A) of this subsection.

(C) Actual emissions equal the potential to emit of the source for the sources listed in paragraphs (i) through (iii) of this paragraph. The actual emissions will be reset if required in accordance with subsection (c) of this section.

(i) Any source or part of a source that had not begun normal operations during the applicable baseline period but was approved to construct and operate before or during the baseline period in accordance with OAR 340 division 210, or

(ii) Any source or part of a source of greenhouse gases that had not begun normal operations prior to January 1, 2010, but was approved to construct and operate prior to January 1, 2011 in accordance with OAR 340 division 210, or

(iii) Any source or part of a source that had not begun normal operations during the applicable baseline period and was not required to obtain approval to construct and operate before or during the applicable baseline period.

(b) For any source or part of a source that had not begun normal operations during the applicable baseline period, but was approved to construct and operate in accordance with OAR 340 division 224, actual emissions on the date the permit is issued equal the potential to emit of the source. The actual emissions will be reset if required in accordance with subsection (c) of this section.

(c) Where actual emissions equal potential to emit under paragraph (a)(C) or subsection (b) of this section, the potential emissions will be reset to actual emissions as follows:

(A) Paragraphs (A) through (D) of this subsection apply to sources whose actual emissions of greenhouse gases were determined pursuant paragraph 3(a)(C), and to all other sources of all other regulated pollutants that are permitted in accordance with OAR division 224 on or after May 1, 2011.

(B) Except as provided in paragraph (D) of this subsection, ten years from the end of the applicable baseline period under paragraph (a)(C) or ten years from the date the permit is issued under subsection (b), or an earlier time if requested by the source in a permit application involving public notice, the Department will reset actual emissions to equal the highest actual emission rate during any consecutive 12-month period during the ten year period or any shorter period if requested by the source.

(C) Any emission reductions achieved due to enforceable permit conditions based on OAR 340-226-0110 and 0120 (highest and best practicable treatment and control) are not included in the reset calculation required in paragraph (B) of this subsection.

(D) The Department may extend the date of resetting by five additional years upon satisfactory demonstration by the source that construction is ongoing or normal operation has not yet been achieved.

(d) For determining actual emissions for Emission Statements under OAR 340-214-0200 through 340-214-0220 and Oregon Title V Operating Permit Fees under OAR 340 division 220, actual emissions include, but are not limited to, routine process emissions, fugitive emissions, excess emissions from maintenance, startups and shutdowns, equipment malfunction, and other activities, except categorically insignificant activities and secondary emissions.

(e) For Oregon Title V Operating Permit Fees under OAR 340 division 220, actual emissions must be directly measured with a continuous monitoring system or calculated using a material balance or verified emission factor determined in accordance with division 220 in combination with the source’s actual operating hours, production rates, or types of materials processed, stored, or combusted during the specified time period.

(4) “Adjacent” means interdependent facilities that are nearby to each other.

(5) “Affected source” means a source that includes one or more affected units that are subject to emission reduction requirements or limitations under Title IV of the FCAA.

(6) “Affected states” means all states:

(a) Whose air quality may be affected by a proposed permit, permit modification, or permit renewal and that are contiguous to Oregon; or

(b) That are within 50 miles of the permitted source.

(7) “Aggregate insignificant emissions” means the annual actual emissions of any regulated air pollutant from one or more designated activities at a source that are less than or equal to the lowest applicable level specified in this section. The total emissions from each designated activity and the aggregate emissions from all designated activities must be less than or equal to the lowest applicable level specified.

(a) One ton for total reduced sulfur, hydrogen sulfide, sulfuric acid mist, any Class I or II substance subject to a standard promulgated under or established by Title VI of the Act, and each criteria pollutant, except lead;

(b) 120 pounds for lead;

(c) 600 pounds for fluoride;

(d) 500 pounds for PM10 in a PM10 nonattainment area;

(e) 500 pounds for direct PM2.5 in a PM2.5 nonattainment area;

(f) The lesser of the amount established in OAR 340-244-0040, Table 1 or 340-244-0230, Table 3, or 1,000 pounds;

(g) An aggregate of 5,000 pounds for all Hazardous Air Pollutants;

(h) 2,756 tons CO2e for greenhouse gases.

(8) “Air Contaminant” means a dust, fume, gas, mist, odor, smoke, vapor, pollen, soot, carbon, acid or particulate matter, or any combination thereof.

(9) “Air Contaminant Discharge Permit” or “ACDP” means a written permit issued, renewed, amended, or revised by the Department, pursuant to OAR 340 division 216.

(10) “Alternative method” means any method of sampling and analyzing for an air pollutant that is not a reference or equivalent method but has been demonstrated to the Department’s satisfaction to, in specific cases, produce results adequate for determination of compliance. An alternative method used to meet an applicable federal requirement for which a reference method is specified must be approved by EPA unless EPA has delegated authority for the approval to the Department.

(11) “Ambient Air” means that portion of the atmosphere, external to buildings, to which the general public has access.

(12) “Applicable requirement” means all of the following as they apply to emissions units in an Oregon Title V Operating Permit program source or ACDP program source, including requirements that have been promulgated or approved by the EPA through rule making at the time of issuance but have future-effective compliance dates:

(a) Any standard or other requirement provided for in the applicable implementation plan approved or promulgated by the EPA through rulemaking under Title I of the Act that implements the relevant requirements of the Act, including any revisions to that plan promulgated in 40 CFR Part 52;

(b) Any standard or other requirement adopted under OAR 340-200-0040 of the State of Oregon Clean Air Act Implementation Plan that is more stringent than the federal standard or requirement which has not yet been approved by the EPA, and other state-only enforceable air pollution control requirements;

(c) Any term or condition in an ACDP, OAR 340 division 216, including any term or condition of any preconstruction permits issued pursuant to OAR 340 division 224, New Source Review, until or unless the Department revokes or modifies the term or condition by a permit modification;

(d) Any term or condition in a Notice of Construction and Approval of Plans, OAR 340-210-0205 through 340-210-0240, until or unless the Department revokes or modifies the term or condition by a Notice of Construction and Approval of Plans or a permit modification;

(e) Any term or condition in a Notice of Approval, OAR 340-218-0190, issued before July 1, 2001, until or unless the Department revokes or modifies the term or condition by a Notice of Approval or a permit modification;

(f) Any term or condition of a PSD permit issued by the EPA until or unless the EPA revokes or modifies the term or condition by a permit modification;

(g) Any standard or other requirement under section 111 of the Act, including section 111(d);

(h) Any standard or other requirement under section 112 of the Act, including any requirement concerning accident prevention under section 112(r)(7) of the Act;

(i) Any standard or other requirement of the acid rain program under Title IV of the Act or the regulations promulgated thereunder;

(j) Any requirements established pursuant to section 504(b) or section 114(a)(3) of the Act;

(k) Any standard or other requirement under section 126(a)(1) and (c) of the Act;

(l) Any standard or other requirement governing solid waste incineration, under section 129 of the Act;

(m) Any standard or other requirement for consumer and commercial products, under section 183(e) of the Act;

(n) Any standard or other requirement for tank vessels, under section 183(f) of the Act;

(o) Any standard or other requirement of the program to control air pollution from outer continental shelf sources, under section 328 of the Act;

(p) Any standard or other requirement of the regulations promulgated to protect stratospheric ozone under Title VI of the Act, unless the Administrator has determined that such requirements need not be contained in an Oregon Title V Operating Permit; and

(q) Any national ambient air quality standard or increment or visibility requirement under part C of Title I of the Act, but only as it would apply to temporary sources permitted pursuant to section 504(e) of the Act.

(13) “Baseline Emission Rate” means the actual emission rate during a baseline period. Baseline emission rate does not include increases due to voluntary fuel switches or increased hours of operation that occurred after that baseline period.

(a) A baseline emission rate will be established only for regulated pollutants subject to OAR 340 division 224 as specified in the definition of regulated pollutant. A baseline emission rate will not be established for PM2.5.

(b) The baseline emission rate for greenhouse gases, on a CO2e basis, will be established with the first permitting action issued after July 1, 2011, provided the permitting action involved a public notice period that began after July 1, 2011.

(c) For a pollutant that becomes a regulated pollutant subject to OAR 340 division 224 after May 1, 2011, the initial baseline emission rate is the actual emissions of that pollutant during any consecutive 12 month period within the 24 months immediately preceding its designation as a regulated pollutant if a baseline period has not been defined for the pollutant.

(d) The baseline emission rate will be recalculated if actual emissions are reset in accordance with the definition of actual emissions.

(e) Once the baseline emission rate has been established or recalculated in accordance with subsection (d) of this section, the production basis for the baseline emission rate may only be changed if a material mistake or an inaccurate statement was made in establishing the production basis for baseline emission rate.

(14) “Baseline Period” means:

(a) Any consecutive 12 calendar month period during the calendar years 1977 or 1978 for any regulated pollutant other than greenhouse gases. The Department may allow the use of a prior time period upon a determination that it is more representative of normal source operation.

(b) Any consecutive 12 calendar month period during the calendar years 2000 through 2010 for greenhouse gases.

(15) “Best Available Control Technology” or “BACT” means an emission limitation, including, but not limited to, a visible emission standard, based on the maximum degree of reduction of each air contaminant subject to regulation under the Act which would be emitted from any proposed major source or major modification which, on a case-by-case basis, taking into account energy, environmental, and economic impacts and other costs, is achievable for such source or modification through application of production processes or available methods, systems, and techniques, including fuel cleaning or treatment or innovative fuel combustion techniques for control of such air contaminant. In no event may the application of BACT result in emissions of any air contaminant that would exceed the emissions allowed by any applicable new source performance standard or any standard for hazardous air pollutant. If an emission limitation is not feasible, a design, equipment, work practice, or operational standard, or combination thereof, may be required. Such standard must, to the degree possible, set forth the emission reduction achievable and provide for compliance by prescribing appropriate permit conditions.

(16) “Biomass” means non-fossilized and biodegradable organic material originating from plants, animals, and micro-organisms, including products, byproducts, residues and waste from agriculture, forestry, and related industries as well as the non-fossilized and biodegradable organic fractions of industrial and municipal wastes, including gases and liquids recovered from the decomposition of non-fossilized and biodegradable organic matter.

(17) “Capacity” means the maximum regulated pollutant emissions from a stationary source under its physical and operational design.

(18) “Capture system” means the equipment (including but not limited to hoods, ducts, fans, and booths) used to contain, capture and transport a pollutant to a control device.

(19) “Carbon dioxide equivalent” or “CO2e” means an amount of a greenhouse gas or gases expressed as the equivalent amount of carbon dioxide, and shall be computed by multiplying the mass of each of the greenhouse gases by the global warming potential published for each gas at 40 CFR Part 98, subpart A, Table A–1—Global Warming Potentials, and adding the resulting value for each greenhouse gas to compute the total equivalent amount of carbon dioxide.

(20) “Categorically insignificant activity” means any of the following listed pollutant emitting activities principally supporting the source or the major industrial group. Categorically insignificant activities must comply with all applicable requirements.

(a) Constituents of a chemical mixture present at less than 1% by weight of any chemical or compound regulated under divisions 200 through 268 excluding divisions 248 and 262 of this chapter, or less than 0.1% by weight of any carcinogen listed in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service’s Annual Report on Carcinogens when usage of the chemical mixture is less than 100,000 pounds/year;

(b) Evaporative and tail pipe emissions from on-site motor vehicle operation;

(c) Distillate oil, kerosene, and gasoline fuel burning equipment rated at less than or equal to 0.4 million Btu/hr;

(d) Natural gas and propane burning equipment rated at less than or equal to 2.0 million Btu/hr;

(e) Office activities;

(f) Food service activities;

(g) Janitorial activities;

(h) Personal care activities;

(i) Groundskeeping activities including, but not limited to building painting and road and parking lot maintenance;

(j) On-site laundry activities;

(k) On-site recreation facilities;

(l) Instrument calibration;

(m) Maintenance and repair shop;

(n) Automotive repair shops or storage garages;

(o) Air cooling or ventilating equipment not designed to remove air contaminants generated by or released from associated equipment;

(p) Refrigeration systems with less than 50 pounds of charge of ozone depleting substances regulated under Title VI, including pressure tanks used in refrigeration systems but excluding any combustion equipment associated with such systems;

(q) Bench scale laboratory equipment and laboratory equipment used exclusively for chemical and physical analysis, including associated vacuum producing devices but excluding research and development facilities;

(r) Temporary construction activities;

(s) Warehouse activities;

(t) Accidental fires;

(u) Air vents from air compressors;

(v) Air purification systems;

(w) Continuous emissions monitoring vent lines;

(x) Demineralized water tanks;

(y) Pre-treatment of municipal water, including use of deionized water purification systems;

(z) Electrical charging stations;

(aa) Fire brigade training;

(bb) Instrument air dryers and distribution;

(cc) Process raw water filtration systems;

(dd) Pharmaceutical packaging;

(ee) Fire suppression;

(ff) Blueprint making;

(gg) Routine maintenance, repair, and replacement such as anticipated activities most often associated with and performed during regularly scheduled equipment outages to maintain a plant and its equipment in good operating condition, including but not limited to steam cleaning, abrasive use, and woodworking;

(hh) Electric motors;

(ii) Storage tanks, reservoirs, transfer and lubricating equipment used for ASTM grade distillate or residual fuels, lubricants, and hydraulic fluids;

(jj) On-site storage tanks not subject to any New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), including underground storage tanks (UST), storing gasoline or diesel used exclusively for fueling of the facility’s fleet of vehicles;

(kk) Natural gas, propane, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) storage tanks and transfer equipment;

(ll) Pressurized tanks containing gaseous compounds;

(mm) Vacuum sheet stacker vents;

(nn) Emissions from wastewater discharges to publicly owned treatment works (POTW) provided the source is authorized to discharge to the POTW, not including on-site wastewater treatment and/or holding facilities;

(oo) Log ponds;

(pp) Storm water settling basins;

(qq) Fire suppression and training;

(rr) Paved roads and paved parking lots within an urban growth boundary;

(ss) Hazardous air pollutant emissions of fugitive dust from paved and unpaved roads except for those sources that have processes or activities that contribute to the deposition and entrainment of hazardous air pollutants from surface soils;

(tt) Health, safety, and emergency response activities;

(uu) Emergency generators and pumps used only during loss of primary equipment or utility service due to circumstances beyond the reasonable control of the owner or operator, or to address a power emergency as determined by the Department;

(vv) Non-contact steam vents and leaks and safety and relief valves for boiler steam distribution systems;

(ww) Non-contact steam condensate flash tanks;

(xx) Non-contact steam vents on condensate receivers, deaerators and similar equipment;

(yy) Boiler blowdown tanks;

(zz) Industrial cooling towers that do not use chromium-based water treatment chemicals;

(aaa) Ash piles maintained in a wetted condition and associated handling systems and activities;

(bbb) Oil/water separators in effluent treatment systems;

(ccc) Combustion source flame safety purging on startup;

(ddd) Broke beaters, pulp and repulping tanks, stock chests and pulp handling equipment, excluding thickening equipment and repulpers;

(eee) Stock cleaning and pressurized pulp washing, excluding open stock washing systems; and

(fff) White water storage tanks.

(21) “Certifying individual” means the responsible person or official authorized by the owner or operator of a source who certifies the accuracy of the emission statement.

(22) “CFR” means Code of Federal Regulations.

(23) “Class I area” means any Federal, State or Indian reservation land which is classified or reclassified as Class I area. Class I areas are identified in OAR 340-204-0050.

(24) “Commence” or “commencement” means that the owner or operator has obtained all necessary preconstruction approvals required by the Act and either has:

(a) Begun, or caused to begin, a continuous program of actual on-site construction of the source to be completed in a reasonable time; or

(b) Entered into binding agreements or contractual obligations, which cannot be canceled or modified without substantial loss to the owner or operator, to undertake a program of construction of the source to be completed in a reasonable time.

(25) “Commission” or “EQC” means Environmental Quality Commission.

(26) “Constant Process Rate” means the average variation in process rate for the calendar year is not greater than plus or minus ten percent of the average process rate.

(27) “Construction”:

(a) Except as provided in subsection (b) of this section means any physical change including, but not limited to, fabrication, erection, installation, demolition, or modification of a source or part of a source;

(b) As used in OAR 340 division 224 means any physical change including, but not limited to, fabrication, erection, installation, demolition, or modification of an emissions unit, or change in the method of operation of a source which would result in a change in actual emissions.

(28) “Continuous compliance determination method” means a method, specified by the applicable standard or an applicable permit condition, which:

(a) Is used to determine compliance with an emission limitation or standard on a continuous basis, consistent with the averaging period established for the emission limitation or standard; and

(b) Provides data either in units of the standard or correlated directly with the compliance limit.

(29) “Continuous Monitoring Systems” means sampling and analysis, in a timed sequence, using techniques which will adequately reflect actual emissions or concentrations on a continuing basis in accordance with the Department’s Continuous Monitoring Manual, and includes continuous emission monitoring systems, continuous opacity monitoring system (COMS) and continuous parameter monitoring systems.

(30) “Control device” means equipment, other than inherent process equipment that is used to destroy or remove air pollutant(s) prior to discharge to the atmosphere. The types of equipment that may commonly be used as control devices include, but are not limited to, fabric filters, mechanical collectors, electrostatic precipitators, inertial separators, afterburners, thermal or catalytic incinerators, adsorption devices(such as carbon beds), condensers, scrubbers(such as wet collection and gas absorption devices), selective catalytic or non-catalytic reduction systems, flue gas recirculation systems, spray dryers, spray towers, mist eliminators, acid plants, sulfur recovery plants, injection systems(such as water, steam, ammonia, sorbent or limestone injection), and combustion devices independent of the particular process being conducted at an emissions unit(e.g., the destruction of emissions achieved by venting process emission streams to flares, boilers or process heaters). For purposes of OAR 340-212-0200 through 340-212-0280, a control device does not include passive control measures that act to prevent pollutants from forming, such as the use of seals, lids, or roofs to prevent the release of pollutants, use of low-polluting fuel or feedstocks, or the use of combustion or other process design features or characteristics. If an applicable requirement establishes that particular equipment which otherwise meets this definition of a control device does not constitute a control device as applied to a particular pollutant-specific emissions unit, then that definition will be binding for purposes of OAR 340-212-0200 through 340-212-0280.

(31) “Criteria Pollutant” means nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, particulate matter, PM10, PM2.5, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, or lead.

(32) “Data” means the results of any type of monitoring or method, including the results of instrumental or non-instrumental monitoring, emission calculations, manual sampling procedures, recordkeeping procedures, or any other form of information collection procedure used in connection with any type of monitoring or method.

(33) “De minimis emission levels” mean the levels for the pollutants listed in Table 4.

NOTE: De minimis is compared to all increases that are not included in the PSEL.

(34) “Department”:

(a) Means Department of Environmental Quality; except

(b) As used in OAR 340 divisions 218 and 220 means Department of Environmental Quality or in the case of Lane County, Lane Regional Air Protection Agency.

(35) “Device” means any machine, equipment, raw material, product, or byproduct at a source that produces or emits a regulated pollutant.

(36) “Direct PM2.5” has the meaning provided in the definition of PM2.5.

(37) “Director” means the Director of the Department or the Director’s designee.

(38) “Draft permit” means the version of an Oregon Title V Operating Permit for which the Department or Lane Regional Air Protection Agency offers public participation under OAR 340-218-0210 or the EPA and affected State review under 340-218-0230.

(39) “Effective date of the program” means the date that the EPA approves the Oregon Title V Operating Permit program submitted by the Department on a full or interim basis. In case of a partial approval, the “effective date of the program” for each portion of the program is the date of the EPA approval of that portion.

(40) “Emergency” means any situation arising from sudden and reasonably unforeseeable events beyond the control of the owner or operator, including acts of God, which situation requires immediate corrective action to restore normal operation, and that causes the source to exceed a technology-based emission limitation under the permit, due to unavoidable increases in emissions attributable to the emergency. An emergency does not include noncompliance to the extent caused by improperly designed equipment, lack of preventative maintenance, careless or improper operation, or operator error.

(41) “Emission” means a release into the atmosphere of any regulated pollutant or any air contaminant.

(42) “Emission Estimate Adjustment Factor” or “EEAF” means an adjustment applied to an emission factor to account for the relative inaccuracy of the emission factor.

(43) “Emission Factor” means an estimate of the rate at which a pollutant is released into the atmosphere, as the result of some activity, divided by the rate of that activity (e.g., production or process rate).

(44)(a) Except as provided in subsection (b) of this section, “Emission Limitation” and “Emission Standard” mean a requirement established by a State, local government, or the EPA which limits the quantity, rate, or concentration of emissions of air pollutants on a continuous basis, including any requirements which limit the level of opacity, prescribe equipment, set fuel specifications, or prescribe operation or maintenance procedures for a source to assure continuous emission reduction.

(b) As used in OAR 340-212-0200 through 340-212-0280, “Emission limitation or standard” means any applicable requirement that constitutes an emission limitation, emission standard, standard of performance or means of emission limitation as defined under the Act. An emission limitation or standard may be expressed in terms of the pollutant, expressed either as a specific quantity, rate or concentration of emissions (e.g., pounds of SO2 per hour, pounds of SO2 per million British thermal units of fuel input, kilograms of VOC per liter of applied coating solids, or parts per million by volume of SO2) or as the relationship of uncontrolled to controlled emissions (e.g., percentage capture and destruction efficiency of VOC or percentage reduction of SO2). An emission limitation or standard may also be expressed either as a work practice, process or control device parameter, or other form of specific design, equipment, operational, or operation and maintenance requirement. For purposes of 340-212-0200 through 340-212-0280, an emission limitation or standard does not include general operation requirements that an owner or operator may be required to meet, such as requirements to obtain a permit, to operate and maintain sources in accordance with good air pollution control practices, to develop and maintain a malfunction abatement plan, to keep records, submit reports, or conduct monitoring.

(45) “Emission Reduction Credit Banking” means to presently reserve, subject to requirements of OAR 340 division 268, Emission Reduction Credits, emission reductions for use by the reserver or assignee for future compliance with air pollution reduction requirements.

(46) “Emission Reporting Form” means a paper or electronic form developed by the Department that must be completed by the permittee to report calculated emissions, actual emissions, or permitted emissions for interim emission fee assessment purposes.

(47) “Emissions unit” means any part or activity of a source that emits or has the potential to emit any regulated air pollutant.

(a) A part of a source is any machine, equipment, raw material, product, or byproduct that produces or emits regulated air pollutants. An activity is any process, operation, action, or reaction (e.g., chemical) at a stationary source that emits regulated air pollutants. Except as described in subsection (d) of this section, parts and activities may be grouped for purposes of defining an emissions unit if the following conditions are met:

(A) The group used to define the emissions unit may not include discrete parts or activities to which a distinct emissions standard applies or for which different compliance demonstration requirements apply; and

(B) The emissions from the emissions unit are quantifiable.

(b) Emissions units may be defined on a pollutant by pollutant basis where applicable.

(c) The term emissions unit is not meant to alter or affect the definition of the term “unit” under Title IV of the FCAA.

(d) Parts and activities cannot be grouped for determining emissions increases from an emissions unit under OAR 340-224-0050 through 340-224-0070, or 340 division 210, or for determining the applicability of any New Source Performance Standard (NSPS).

(48) “EPA” or “Administrator” means the Administrator of the United States Environmental Protection Agency or the Administrator’s designee.

(49) “Equivalent method” means any method of sampling and analyzing for an air pollutant that has been demonstrated to the Department’s satisfaction to have a consistent and quantitatively known relationship to the reference method, under specified conditions. An equivalent method used to meet an applicable federal requirement for which a reference method is specified must be approved by EPA unless EPA has delegated authority for the approval to the Department.

(50) “Event” means excess emissions that arise from the same condition and occur during a single calendar day or continue into subsequent calendar days.

(51) “Exceedance” means a condition that is detected by monitoring that provides data in terms of an emission limitation or standard and that indicates that emissions (or opacity) are greater than the applicable emission limitation or standard(or less than the applicable standard in the case of a percent reduction requirement) consistent with any averaging period specified for averaging the results of the monitoring.

(52) “Excess emissions” means emissions in excess of a permit limit or any applicable air quality rule.

(53) “Excursion” means a departure from an indicator range established for monitoring under OAR 340-212-0200 through 340-212-0280 and 340-218-0050(3)(a), consistent with any averaging period specified for averaging the results of the monitoring.

(54) “Federal Land Manager” means with respect to any lands in the United States, the Secretary of the federal department with authority over such lands.

(55) “Federal Major Source” means a source with potential to emit any individual regulated pollutant, excluding hazardous air pollutants listed in OAR 340 division 244, greater than or equal to 100 tons per year if in a source category listed below, or 250 tons per year if not in a source category listed. In addition, for greenhouse gases, a federal major source must also have the potential to emit CO2e greater than or equal to 100,000 tons per year. The fugitive emissions and insignificant activity emissions of a stationary source are considered in determining whether it is a federal major source. Potential to emit calculations must include emission increases due to a new or modified source and may include emission decreases.

(a) Fossil fuel-fired steam electric plants of more than 250 million BTU/hour heat input;

(b) Coal cleaning plants with thermal dryers;

(c) Kraft pulp mills;

(d) Portland cement plants;

(e) Primary Zinc Smelters;

(f) Iron and Steel Mill Plants;

(g) Primary aluminum ore reduction plants;

(h) Primary copper smelters;

(i) Municipal Incinerators capable of charging more than 50 tons of refuse per day;

(j) Hydrofluoric acid plants;

(k) Sulfuric acid plants;

(l) Nitric acid plants;

(m) Petroleum Refineries;

(n) Lime plants;

(o) Phosphate rock processing plants;

(p) Coke oven batteries;

(q) Sulfur recovery plants;

(r) Carbon black plants, furnace process;

(s) Primary lead smelters;

(t) Fuel conversion plants;

(u) Sintering plants;

(v) Secondary metal production plants;

(w) Chemical process plants;

(x) Fossil fuel fired boilers, or combinations thereof, totaling more than 250 million BTU per hour heat input;

(y) Petroleum storage and transfer units with a total storage capacity exceeding 300,000 barrels;

(z) Taconite ore processing plants;

(aa) Glass fiber processing plants;

(bb) Charcoal production plants.

(56) “Final permit” means the version of an Oregon Title V Operating Permit issued by the Department or Lane Regional Air Protection Agency that has completed all review procedures required by OAR 340-218-0120 through 340-218-0240.

(57) “Form” means a paper or electronic form developed by the Department.

(58) “Fugitive Emissions”:

(a) Except as used in subsection (b) of this section, means emissions of any air contaminant which escape to the atmosphere from any point or area that is not identifiable as a stack, vent, duct, or equivalent opening.

(b) As used to define a major Oregon Title V Operating Permit program source, means those emissions which could not reasonably pass through a stack, chimney, vent, or other functionally equivalent opening.

(59) “General permit”:

(a) Except as provided in subsection (b) of this section, means an Oregon Air Contaminant Discharge Permit established under OAR 340-216-0060;

(b) As used in OAR 340 division 218 means an Oregon Title V Operating Permit established under OAR 340-218-0090.

(60) “Generic PSEL” means the levels for the pollutants listed in Table 5.

NOTE: Sources are eligible for a generic PSEL if expected emissions are less than or equal to the levels listed in Table 5. Baseline emission rate and netting basis do not apply to pollutants at sources using generic PSELs.

(61)(a) “Greenhouse Gases” or “GHGs” means the aggregate group of six greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride. Each gas is also individually a greenhouse gas.

(b) The definition of greenhouse gases in subsection (a) of this section does not include, for purposes of division 216, 218, and 224, carbon dioxide emissions from the combustion or decomposition of biomass except to the extent required by federal law.

(62) “Growth Allowance” means an allocation of some part of an airshed’s capacity to accommodate future proposed major sources and major modifications of sources.

(63) “Immediately” means as soon as possible but in no case more than one hour after a source knew or should have known of an excess emission period.

(64) “Inherent process equipment” means equipment that is necessary for the proper or safe functioning of the process, or material recovery equipment that the owner or operator documents is installed and operated primarily for purposes other than compliance with air pollution regulations. Equipment that must be operated at an efficiency higher than that achieved during normal process operations in order to comply with the applicable emission limitation or standard is not inherent process equipment. For the purposes of OAR 340-212-0200 through 340-212-0280, inherent process equipment is not considered a control device.

(65) “Insignificant Activity” means an activity or emission that the Department has designated as categorically insignificant, or that meets the criteria of aggregate insignificant emissions.

(66) “Insignificant Change” means an off-permit change defined under OAR 340-218-0140(2)(a) to either a significant or an insignificant activity which:

(a) Does not result in a re-designation from an insignificant to a significant activity;

(b) Does not invoke an applicable requirement not included in the permit; and

(c) Does not result in emission of regulated air pollutants not regulated by the source’s permit.

(67) “Late Payment” means a fee payment which is postmarked after the due date.

(68) “Lowest Achievable Emission Rate” or “LAER” means that rate of emissions which reflects: the most stringent emission limitation which is contained in the implementation plan of any state for such class or category of source, unless the owner or operator of the proposed source demonstrates that such limitations are not achievable; or the most stringent emission limitation which is achieved in practice by such class or category of source, whichever is more stringent. The application of this term cannot permit a proposed new or modified source to emit any air contaminant in excess of the amount allowable under applicable New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) or standards for hazardous air pollutants.

(69) “Maintenance Area” means a geographical area of the State that was designated as a nonattainment area, redesignated as an attainment area by EPA, and redesignated as a maintenance area by the Environmental Quality Commission in OAR 340, division 204.

(70) “Maintenance Pollutant” means a pollutant for which a maintenance area was formerly designated a nonattainment area.

(71) “Major Modification” means any physical change or change in the method of operation of a source that results in satisfying the requirements of both subsections (a) and (b) of this section, or of subsection (c) of this section for any regulated air pollutant. Major modifications for ozone precursors or PM2.5 precursors also constitute major modifications for ozone and PM2.5, respectively.

(a) Except as provided in subsection (d) of this section, a PSEL that exceeds the netting basis by an amount that is equal to or greater than the significant emission rate.

(b) The accumulation of emission increases due to physical changes and changes in the method of operation as determined in accordance with paragraphs (A) and (B) of this subsection is equal to or greater than the significant emission rate.

(A) Calculations of emission increases in subsection (b) of this section must account for all accumulated increases in actual emissions due to physical changes and changes in the method of operation occurring at the source since the applicable baseline period, or since the time of the last construction approval issued for the source pursuant to the New Source Review Regulations in OAR 340 division 224 for that pollutant, whichever time is more recent. These include fugitive emissions and emissions from insignificant activities.

(B) Emission increases due solely to increased use of equipment or facilities that existed or were permitted or approved to construct in accordance with OAR 340 division 210 during the applicable baseline period are not included, except if the increased use is to support a physical change or change in the method of operation.

(c) Any change at a source, including production increases, that would result in a Plant Site Emission Limit increase of 1 ton or more for any regulated pollutant for which the source is a major source in nonattainment or maintenance areas or a federal major source in attainment or unclassified areas, if the source obtained permits to construct and operate after the applicable baseline period but has not undergone New Source Review.

(A) Subsection (c) of this section does not apply to PM2.5 and greenhouse gases.

(B) Changes to the PSEL solely due to the availability of better emissions information are exempt from being considered an increase.

(d) If a portion of the netting basis or PSEL (or both) was set based on PTE because the source had not begun normal operations but was permitted or approved to construct and operate, that portion of the netting basis or PSEL (or both) must be excluded from the tests in subsections (a) and (b) of this section until the netting basis is reset as specified in the definitions of baseline emission rate and netting basis.

(e) The following are not considered major modifications:

(A) Except as provided in subsection (c) of this section, proposed increases in hours of operation or production rates that would cause emission increases above the levels allowed in a permit and would not involve a physical change or change in method of operation in the source;

(B) Routine maintenance, repair, and replacement of components;

(C) Temporary equipment installed for maintenance of the permanent equipment if the temporary equipment is in place for less than six months and operated within the permanent equipment’s existing PSEL;

(D) Use of alternate fuel or raw materials, that were available and the source was capable of accommodating in the baseline period.

(72) “Major Source”:

(a) Except as provided in subsection (b) of this section, means a source that emits, or has the potential to emit, any regulated air pollutant at a Significant Emission Rate. The fugitive emissions and insignificant activity emissions of a stationary source are considered in determining whether it is a major source. Potential to emit calculations must include emission increases due to a new or modified source and may include emission decreases.

(b) As used in OAR 340 division 210, Stationary Source Notification Requirements, OAR 340 division 218, rules applicable to sources required to have Oregon Title V Operating Permits, OAR 340 division 220, Oregon Title V Operating Permit Fees, and 340-216-0066 Standard ACDPs, means any stationary source (or any group of stationary sources that are located on one or more contiguous or adjacent properties and are under common control of the same person (or persons under common control)) belonging to a single major industrial grouping or supporting the major industrial group and that is described in paragraphs (A), (B), (C) or (D) of this subsection. For the purposes of this subsection, a stationary source or group of stationary sources is considered part of a single industrial grouping if all of the pollutant emitting activities at such source or group of sources on contiguous or adjacent properties belong to the same Major Group (i.e., all have the same two-digit code) as described in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual (U.S. Office of Management and Budget, 1987) or support the major industrial group.

(A) A major source of hazardous air pollutants, which means:

(i) For pollutants other than radionuclides, any stationary source or group of stationary sources located within a contiguous area and under common control that emits or has the potential to emit, in the aggregate, 10 tons per year (tpy) or more of any hazardous air pollutants that has been listed pursuant to OAR 340-244-0040; 25 tpy or more of any combination of such hazardous air pollutants, or such lesser quantity as the Administrator may establish by rule. Emissions from any oil or gas exploration or production well, along with its associated equipment, and emissions from any pipeline compressor or pump station will not be aggregated with emissions from other similar units, whether or not such units are in a contiguous area or under common control, to determine whether such units or stations are major sources; or

(ii) For radionuclides, “major source” will have the meaning specified by the Administrator by rule.

(B) A major stationary source of air pollutants, as defined in section 302 of the Act, that directly emits or has the potential to emit 100 tpy or more of any regulated air pollutant, except greenhouse gases, including any major source of fugitive emissions of any such pollutant. The fugitive emissions of a stationary source are not considered in determining whether it is a major stationary source for the purposes of section 302(j) of the Act, unless the source belongs to one of the following categories of stationary source:

(i) Coal cleaning plants (with thermal dryers);

(ii) Kraft pulp mills;

(iii) Portland cement plants;

(iv) Primary zinc smelters;

(v) Iron and steel mills;

(vi) Primary aluminum ore reduction plants;

(vii) Primary copper smelters;

(viii) Municipal incinerators capable of charging more than 50 tons of refuse per day;

(ix) Hydrofluoric, sulfuric, or nitric acid plants;

(x) Petroleum refineries;

(xi) Lime plants;

(xii) Phosphate rock processing plants;

(xiii) Coke oven batteries;

(xiv) Sulfur recovery plants;

(xv) Carbon black plants(furnace process);

(xvi) Primary lead smelters;

(xvii) Fuel conversion plants;

(xviii) Sintering plants;

(xix) Secondary metal production plants;

(xx) Chemical process plants;

(xxi) Fossil-fuel boilers, or combination thereof, totaling more than 250 million British thermal units per hour heat input;

(xxii) Petroleum storage and transfer units with a total storage capacity exceeding 300,000 barrels;

(xxiii) Taconite ore processing plants;

(xxiv) Glass fiber processing plants;

(xxv) Charcoal production plants;

(xxvi) Fossil-fuel-fired steam electric plants of more than 250 million British thermal units per hour heat input; or

(xxvii) Any other stationary source category, that as of August 7, 1980 is being regulated under section 111 or 112 of the Act.

(C) Beginning July 1, 2011, a major stationary source of air pollutants, as defined by Section 302 of the Act, that directly emits or has the potential to emit 100 tpy or more of greenhouse gases and directly emits or has the potential to emit 100,000 tpy or more CO2e, including fugitive emissions.

(D) A major stationary source as defined in part D of Title I of the Act, including:

(i) For ozone nonattainment areas, sources with the potential to emit 100 tpy or more of VOCs or oxides of nitrogen in areas classified as “marginal” or “moderate,” 50 tpy or more in areas classified as “serious,” 25 tpy or more in areas classified as “severe,” and 10 tpy or more in areas classified as “extreme”; except that the references in this paragraph of this subsection to 100, 50, 25, and 10 tpy of nitrogen oxides do not apply with respect to any source for which the Administrator has made a finding, under section 182(f)(1) or (2) of the Act, that requirements under section 182(f) of the Act do not apply;

(ii) For ozone transport regions established pursuant to section 184 of the Act, sources with the potential to emit 50 tpy or more of VOCs;

(iii) For carbon monoxide nonattainment areas:

(I) That are classified as “serious”; and

(II) In which stationary sources contribute significantly to carbon monoxide levels as determined under rules issued by the Administrator, sources with the potential to emit 50 tpy or more of carbon monoxide.

(iv) For particulate matter(PM10) nonattainment areas classified as “serious,” sources with the potential to emit 70 tpy or more of PM10.

(73) “Material Balance” means a procedure for determining emissions based on the difference in the amount of material added to a process and the amount consumed and/or recovered from a process.

(74) “Modification,” except as used in the term “major modification,” means any physical change to, or change in the method of operation of, a stationary source that results in an increase in the stationary source’s potential to emit any regulated air pollutant on an hourly basis. Modifications do not include the following:

(a) Increases in hours of operation or production rates that do not involve a physical change or change in the method of operation;

(b) Changes in the method of operation due to using an alternative fuel or raw material that the stationary source was physically capable of accommodating during the baseline period; and

(c) Routine maintenance, repair and like-for-like replacement of components unless they increase the expected life of the stationary source by using component upgrades that would not otherwise be necessary for the stationary source to function.

(75) “Monitoring” means any form of collecting data on a routine basis to determine or otherwise assess compliance with emission limitations or standards. Monitoring may include record keeping if the records are used to determine or assess compliance with an emission limitation or standard (such as records of raw material content and usage, or records documenting compliance with work practice requirements). Monitoring may include conducting compliance method tests, such as the procedures in appendix A to 40 CFR part 60, on a routine periodic basis. Requirements to conduct such tests on a one-time basis, or at such times as a regulatory authority may require on a non-regular basis, are not considered monitoring requirements for purposes of this definition. Monitoring may include one or more than one of the following data collection techniques as appropriate for a particular circumstance:

(a) Continuous emission or opacity monitoring systems.

(b) Continuous process, capture system, control device or other relevant parameter monitoring systems or procedures, including a predictive emission monitoring system.

(c) Emission estimation and calculation procedures (e.g., mass balance or stoichiometric calculations).

(d) Maintaining and analyzing records of fuel or raw materials usage.

(e) Recording results of a program or protocol to conduct specific operation and maintenance procedures.

(f) Verifying emissions, process parameters, capture system parameters, or control device parameters using portable or in situ measurement devices.

(g) Visible emission observations and recording.

(h) Any other form of measuring, recording, or verifying on a routine basis emissions, process parameters, capture system parameters, control device parameters or other factors relevant to assessing compliance with emission limitations or standards.

(76) “Netting Basis” means the baseline emission rate MINUS any emission reductions required by rule, orders, or permit conditions required by the SIP or used to avoid SIP requirements, MINUS any unassigned emissions that are reduced from allowable under OAR 340-222-0045, MINUS any emission reduction credits transferred off site, PLUS any emission increases approved through the New Source Review regulations in OAR 340 division 224 MINUS any emissions reductions required by subsection (g) of this section.

(a) A netting basis will only be established for regulated pollutants subject to OAR 340 division 224 as specified in the definition of regulated pollutant.

(b) The initial PM2.5 netting basis and PSEL for a source that was permitted prior to May 1, 2011 will be established with the first permitting action issued after July 1, 2011, provided the permitting action involved a public notice period that began after July 1, 2011.

(A) The initial netting basis is the PM2.5 fraction of the PM10 netting basis in effect on May 1, 2011. DEQ may increase the initial PM2.5 netting basis by up to 5 tons if necessary to avoid exceedance of the PM2.5 significant emission rate as of May 1, 2011.

(B) Notwithstanding OAR 340-222-0041(2), the initial source specific PSEL for a source with PTE greater than or equal to the SER will be set equal to the PM2.5 fraction of the PM10 PSEL.

(c) The initial greenhouse gas netting basis and PSEL for a source will be established with the first permitting action issued after July 1, 2011, provided the permitting action involved a public notice period that began after July 1, 2011.

(d) Netting basis is zero for:

(A) Any regulated pollutant emitted from a source that first obtained permits to construct and operate after the applicable baseline period for that regulated pollutant, and has not undergone New Source Review for that pollutant;

(B) Any pollutant that has a generic PSEL in a permit;

(C) Any source permitted as portable; or

(D) Any source with a netting basis calculation resulting in a negative number.

(e) If a source relocates to an adjacent site, and the time between operation at the old and new sites is less than six months, the source may retain the netting basis from the old site.

(f) Emission reductions required by rule, order, or permit condition affect the netting basis if the source currently has devices or emissions units that are subject to the rules, order, or permit condition. The baseline emission rate is not affected. The netting basis reduction will be effective on the effective date of the rule, order, or permit condition requiring the reduction. The PSEL reduction will be effective on the compliance date of the rule, order, or permit condition.

(g) For permits issued after May 1, 2011 under New Source Review regulations in OAR 340 division 224, and where the netting basis initially equaled the potential to emit for a new or modified source, the netting basis will be reduced in accordance with the definition of actual emissions. Notwithstanding OAR 340-222-0041(2), this adjustment does not require a reduction in the PSEL.

(h) Emission reductions required by rule do not include emissions reductions achieved under OAR 340-226-0110 and 0120.

(i) Netting basis for a pollutant with a revised definition will be adjusted if the source is emitting the pollutant at the time of redefining and the pollutant is included in the permit’s netting basis.

(j) Where EPA requires an attainment demonstration based on dispersion modeling, the netting basis will be established at no more than the level used in the dispersion modeling to demonstrate attainment with the ambient air quality standard (i.e., the attainment demonstration is an emission reduction required by rule).

(77) “Nitrogen Oxides” or “NOx” means all oxides of nitrogen except nitrous oxide.

(78) “Nonattainment Area” means a geographical area of the State, as designated by the Environmental Quality Commission or the EPA, that exceeds any state or federal primary or secondary ambient air quality standard.

(79) “Nonattainment Pollutant” means a pollutant for which an area is designated a nonattainment area.

(80) “Normal Source Operation” means operations which do not include such conditions as forced fuel substitution, equipment malfunction, or highly abnormal market conditions.

(81) “Offset” means an equivalent or greater emission reduction that is required before allowing an emission increase from a proposed major source or major modification of an existing source.

(82) “Opacity” means the degree to which an emission reduces transmission of light and obscures the view of an object in the background as measured in accordance with OAR 340-212-0120 and 212-0140. Unless otherwise specified by rule, opacity shall be measured in accordance with EPA Method 9 or a continuous opacity monitoring system (COMS) installed and operated in accordance with the Department’s Continuous Monitoring Manual. For all standards, the minimum observation period shall be six minutes, though longer periods may be required by a specific rule or permit condition. Aggregate times (e.g. 3 minutes in any one hour) consist of the total duration of all readings during the observation period that equal or exceed the opacity percentage in the standard, whether or not the readings are consecutive.

(83) “Oregon Title V Operating Permit” means any permit covering an Oregon Title V Operating Permit source that is issued, renewed, amended, or revised pursuant to division 218.

(84) “Oregon Title V Operating Permit program” means a program approved by the Administrator under 40 CFR Part 70.

(85) “Oregon Title V Operating Permit program source” means any source subject to the permitting requirements, OAR 340 division 218.

(86) “Ozone Precursor” means nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds as measured by an applicable reference method in accordance with the Department’s Source Sampling Manual(January, 1992) or as measured by an EPA reference method in 40 CFR Part 60, appendix A or as measured by a material balance calculation for VOC as appropriate.

(87) “Ozone Season” means the contiguous 3 month period during which ozone exceedances typically occur (i.e., June, July, and August).

(88) “Particulate Matter” means all finely divided solid or liquid material, other than uncombined water, emitted to the ambient air. When used in emission standards, particulate matter is defined by the method specified within the standard or by an applicable reference method in accordance with OAR 340-212-0120 and 340-212-0140. Unless otherwise specified, sources with exhaust gases at or near ambient conditions may be tested with DEQ Method 5 or DEQ Method 8, as approved by the Department. Direct heat transfer sources shall be tested with DEQ Method 7; indirect heat transfer combustion sources and all other non-fugitive emissions sources not listed above shall be tested with DEQ Method 5.

(89) “Permit” means an Air Contaminant Discharge Permit or an Oregon Title V Operating Permit.

(90) “Permit modification” means a permit revision that meets the applicable requirements of OAR 340 division 216, 340 division 224, or 340-218-0160 through 340-218-0180.

(91) “Permit revision” means any permit modification or administrative permit amendment.

(92) “Permitted Emissions” as used in OAR division 220 means each regulated pollutant portion of the PSEL, as identified in an ACDP, Oregon Title V Operating Permit, review report, or by the Department pursuant to OAR 340-220-0090.

(93) “Permittee” means the owner or operator of the facility, authorized by the ACDP or the Oregon Title V Operating Permit to operate the source.

(94) “Person” means individuals, corporations, associations, firms, partnerships, joint stock companies, public and municipal corporations, political subdivisions, the State of Oregon and any agencies thereof, and the federal government and any agencies thereof.

(95) “Plant Site Emission Limit” or “PSEL” means the total mass emissions per unit time of an individual air pollutant specified in a permit for a source. The PSEL for a major source may consist of more than one permitted emission.

(96) “PM10”:

(a) When used in the context of emissions, means finely divided solid or liquid material, including condensable particulate, other than uncombined water, with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to a nominal 10 micrometers, emitted to the ambient air as measured by an applicable reference method in accordance with the Department’s Source Sampling Manual (January, 1992);

(b) When used in the context of ambient concentration, means airborne finely divided solid or liquid material with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to a nominal 10 micrometers as measured in accordance with 40 CFR Part 50, Appendix J.

(97) “PM2.5”:

(a) When used in the context of direct PM2.5 emissions, means finely divided solid or liquid material, including condensable particulate, other than uncombined water, with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to a nominal 2.5 micrometers, emitted to the ambient air as measured by EPA reference methods 201A and 202 in 40 CFR Part 51, appendix M.

(b) When used in the context of PM2.5 precursor emissions, means sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emitted to the ambient air as measured by EPA reference methods in 40 CFR Part 60, appendix A.

(c) When used in the context of ambient concentration, means particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to a nominal 2.5 micrometers as measured by a reference method based on 40 CFR Part 50, Appendix L, or an equivalent method designated in accordance with 40 CFR Part 53.

(98) “PM2.5 fraction” means the fraction of PM2.5 to PM10 for each emissions unit that is included in the netting basis and PSEL.

(99) “Pollutant-specific emissions unit” means an emissions unit considered separately with respect to each regulated air pollutant.

(100) “Potential to emit” or “PTE” means the lesser of:

(a) The capacity of a stationary source; or

(b) The maximum allowable emissions taking into consideration any physical or operational limitation, including air pollution control equipment and restrictions on hours of operation or on the type or amount of material combusted, stored, or processed, if the limitation is enforceable by the Administrator.

(c) This definition does not alter or affect the use of this term for any other purposes under the Act or the term “capacity factor” as used in Title IV of the Act and the regulations promulgated thereunder. Secondary emissions are not considered in determining the potential to emit.

(101) “Predictive emission monitoring system (PEMS)” means a system that uses process and other parameters as inputs to a computer program or other data reduction system to produce values in terms of the applicable emission limitation or standard.

(102) “Process Upset” means a failure or malfunction of a production process or system to operate in a normal and usual manner.

(103) “Proposed permit” means the version of an Oregon Title V Operating Permit that the Department or a Regional Agency proposes to issue and forwards to the Administrator for review in compliance with OAR 340-218-0230.

(104) “Reference method” means any method of sampling and analyzing for an air pollutant as specified in 40 CFR Part 52, 60, 61 or 63.

(105) “Regional Agency” means Lane Regional Air Protection Agency.

(106) “Regulated air pollutant” or “Regulated Pollutant”:

(a) Except as provided in subsections (b) and(c) of this section, means:

(A) Nitrogen oxides or any VOCs;

(B) Any pollutant for which a national ambient air quality standard has been promulgated, including any precursors to such pollutants;

(C) Any pollutant that is subject to any standard promulgated under section 111 of the Act;

(D) Any Class I or II substance subject to a standard promulgated under or established by Title VI of the Act;

(E) Any pollutant listed under OAR 340-244-0040 or 340-244-0230; and

(F) Greenhouse Gases.

(b) As used in OAR 340 division 220, regulated pollutant means particulates, volatile organic compounds, oxides of nitrogen and sulfur dioxide.

(c) As used in OAR 340 division 224, regulated pollutant does not include any pollutant listed in divisions 244 and 246, unless the pollutant is listed in OAR 340 division 200 Table 2 (significant emission rates).

(107) “Renewal” means the process by which a permit is reissued at the end of its term.

(108) “Responsible official” means one of the following:

(a) For a corporation: a president, secretary, treasurer, or vice-president of the corporation in charge of a principal business function, or any other person who performs similar policy or decision-making functions for the corporation, or a duly authorized representative of such person if the representative is responsible for the overall operation of one or more manufacturing, production, or operating facilities applying for or subject to a permit and either:

(A) The facilities employ more than 250 persons or have gross annual sales or expenditures exceeding $25 million (in second quarter 1980 dollars); or

(B) The delegation of authority to such representative is approved in advance by the Department or Lane Regional Air Protection Agency.

(b) For a partnership or sole proprietorship: a general partner or the proprietor, respectively;

(c) For a municipality, State, Federal, or other public agency: either a principal executive officer or ranking elected official. For the purposes of this division, a principal executive officer of a Federal agency includes the chief executive officer having responsibility for the overall operations of a principal geographic unit of the agency (e.g., a Regional Administrator of the EPA); or

(d) For affected sources:

(A) The designated representative in so far as actions, standards, requirements, or prohibitions under Title IV of the Act or the regulations promulgated there under are concerned; and

(B) The designated representative for any other purposes under the Oregon Title V Operating Permit program.

(109) “Secondary Emissions” means emissions that are a result of the construction and/or operation of a source or modification, but that do not come from the source itself. Secondary emissions must be specific, well defined, quantifiable, and impact the same general area as the source associated with the secondary emissions. Secondary emissions may include, but are not limited to:

(a) Emissions from ships and trains coming to or from a facility;

(b) Emissions from off-site support facilities that would be constructed or would otherwise increase emissions as a result of the construction or modification of a source.

(110) “Section 111” means section 111 of the FCAA which includes Standards of Performance for New Stationary Sources (NSPS).

(111) “Section 111(d)” means subsection 111(d) of the FCAA which requires states to submit to the EPA plans that establish standards of performance for existing sources and provides for implementing and enforcing such standards.

(112) “Section 112” means section 112 of the FCAA which contains regulations for Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP).

(113) “Section 112(b)” means subsection 112(b) of the FCAA which includes the list of hazardous air pollutants to be regulated.

(114) “Section 112(d)” means subsection 112(d) of the FCAA which directs the EPA to establish emission standards for sources of hazardous air pollutants. This section also defines the criteria to be used by the EPA when establishing the emission standards.

(115) “Section 112(e)” means subsection 112(e) of the FCAA which directs the EPA to establish and promulgate emissions standards for categories and subcategories of sources that emit hazardous air pollutants.

(116) “Section 112(r)(7)” means subsection 112(r)(7) of the FCAA which requires the EPA to promulgate regulations for the prevention of accidental releases and requires owners or operators to prepare risk management plans.

(117) “Section 114(a)(3)” means subsection 114(a)(3) of the FCAA which requires enhanced monitoring and submission of compliance certifications for major sources.

(118) “Section 129” means section 129 of the FCAA which requires the EPA to establish emission standards and other requirements for solid waste incineration units.

(119) “Section 129(e)” means subsection 129(e) of the FCAA which requires solid waste incineration units to obtain Oregon Title V Operating Permits.

(120) “Section 182(f)” means subsection 182(f) of the FCAA which requires states to include plan provisions in the State Implementation Plan for NOx in ozone nonattainment areas.

(121) “Section 182(f)(1)” means subsection 182(f)(1) of the FCAA which requires states to apply those plan provisions developed for major VOC sources and major NOx sources in ozone nonattainment areas.

(122) “Section 183(e)” means subsection 183(e) of the FCAA which requires the EPA to study and develop regulations for the control of certain VOC sources under federal ozone measures.

(123) “Section 183(f)” means subsection 182(f) of the FCAA which requires the EPA to develop regulations pertaining to tank vessels under federal ozone measures.

(124) “Section 184” means section 184 of the FCAA which contains regulations for the control of interstate ozone air pollution.

(125) “Section 302” means section 302 of the FCAA which contains definitions for general and administrative purposes in the Act.

(126) “Section 302(j)” means subsection 302(j) of the FCAA which contains definitions of “major stationary source” and “major emitting facility.”

(127) “Section 328” means section 328 of the FCAA which contains regulations for air pollution from outer continental shelf activities.

(128) “Section 408(a)” means subsection 408(a) of the FCAA which contains regulations for the Title IV permit program.

(129) “Section 502(b)(10) change” means a change which contravenes an express permit term but is not a change that:

(a) Would violate applicable requirements;

(b) Would contravene federally enforceable permit terms and conditions that are monitoring, recordkeeping, reporting, or compliance certification requirements; or

(c) Is a Title I modification.

(130) “Section 504(b)” means subsection 504(b) of the FCAA which states that the EPA can prescribe by rule procedures and methods for determining compliance and for monitoring.

(131) “Section 504(e)” means subsection 504(e) of the FCAA which contains regulations for permit requirements for temporary sources.

(132) “Significant Air Quality Impact” means an additional ambient air quality concentration equal to or greater than in the concentrations listed in Table 1. The threshold concentrations listed in Table 1 are used for comparison against the ambient air quality standard and do not apply for protecting PSD Class I increments or air quality related values (including visibility). For sources of VOC or NOx, a major source or major modification has a significant impact if it is located within the Ozone Precursor Distance defined in OAR 340-225-0020.

(133) “Significant Emission Rate” or “SER,” except as provided in subsections (a) through(c) of this section, means an emission rate equal to or greater than the rates specified in Table 2.

(a) For the Medford-Ashland Air Quality Maintenance Area, the Significant Emission Rate for PM10 is defined in Table 3.

(b) For regulated air pollutants not listed in Table 2 or 3, the significant emission rate is zero unless the Department determines the rate that constitutes a significant emission rate.

(c) Any new source or modification with an emissions increase less than the rates specified in Table 2 or 3 associated with a new source or modification which would construct within 10 kilometers of a Class I area, and would have an impact on such area equal to or greater than 1 ug/m3 (24 hour average) is emitting at a significant emission rate. This provision does not apply to greenhouse gas emissions.

(134) “Significant Impairment” occurs when the Department determines that visibility impairment interferes with the management, protection, preservation, or enjoyment of the visual experience within a Class I area. The Department will make this determination on a case-by-case basis after considering the recommendations of the Federal Land Manager and the geographic extent, intensity, duration, frequency, and time of visibility impairment. These factors will be considered along with visitor use of the Class I areas, and the frequency and occurrence of natural conditions that reduce visibility.

(135) “Small scale local energy project” means:

(a) A system, mechanism or series of mechanisms located primarily in Oregon that directly or indirectly uses or enables the use of, by the owner or operator, renewable resources including, but not limited to, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, waste heat or water resources to produce energy, including heat, electricity and substitute fuels, to meet a local community or regional energy need in this state;

(b) A system, mechanism or series of mechanisms located primarily in Oregon or providing substantial benefits to Oregon that directly or indirectly conserves energy or enables the conservation of energy by the owner or operator, including energy used in transportation;

(c) A recycling project;

(d) An alternative fuel project;

(e) An improvement that increases the production or efficiency, or extends the operating life, of a system, mechanism, series of mechanisms or project otherwise described in this section of this rule, including but not limited to restarting a dormant project;

(f) A system, mechanism or series of mechanisms installed in a facility or portions of a facility that directly or indirectly reduces the amount of energy needed for the construction and operation of the facility and that meets the sustainable building practices standard established by the State Department of Energy by rule; or

(g) A project described in subsections (a) to (f) of this section, whether or not the existing project was originally financed under ORS 470, together with any refinancing necessary to remove prior liens or encumbrances against the existing project.

(h) A project described in subsections (a) to (g) of this section that conserves energy or produces energy by generation or by processing or collection of a renewable resource.

(136) “Source” means any building, structure, facility, installation or combination thereof that emits or is capable of emitting air contaminants to the atmosphere, is located on one or more contiguous or adjacent properties and is owned or operated by the same person or by persons under common control. The term includes all pollutant emitting activities that belong to a single major industrial group (i.e., that have the same two-digit code) as described in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual, (U.S. Office of Management and Budget, 1987) or that support the major industrial group.

(137) “Source category”:

(a) Except as provided in subsection (b) of this section, means all the pollutant emitting activities that belong to the same industrial grouping (i.e., that have the same two-digit code) as described in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual, (U.S. Office of Management and Budget, 1987).

(b) As used in OAR 340 division 220, Oregon Title V Operating Permit Fees, means a group of major sources that the Department determines are using similar raw materials and have equivalent process controls and pollution control equipment.

(138) “Source Test” means the average of at least three test runs conducted in accordance with the Department’s Source Sampling Manual.

(139) “Startup” and “shutdown” means that time during which an air contaminant source or emission-control equipment is brought into normal operation or normal operation is terminated, respectively.

(140) “State Implementation Plan” or “SIP” means the State of Oregon Clean Air Act Implementation Plan as adopted by the Commission under OAR 340-200-0040 and approved by EPA.

(141) “Stationary source” means any building, structure, facility, or installation at a source that emits or may emit any regulated air pollutant.

(142) “Substantial Underpayment” means the lesser of ten percent (10%) of the total interim emission fee for the major source or five hundred dollars.

(143) “Synthetic minor source” means a source that would be classified as a major source under OAR 340-200-0020, but for limits on its potential to emit air pollutants contained in a permit issued by the Department under OAR 340 division 216 or 218.

(144) “Title I modification” means one of the following modifications pursuant to Title I of the FCAA:

(a) A major modification subject to OAR 340-224-0050, Requirements for Sources in Nonattainment Areas;

(b) A major modification subject to OAR 340-224-0060, Requirements for Sources in Maintenance Areas;

(c) A major modification subject to OAR 340-224-0070, Prevention of Significant Deterioration Requirements for Sources in Attainment or Unclassified Areas;

(d) A modification that is subject to a New Source Performance Standard under Section 111 of the FCAA; or

(e) A modification under Section 112 of the FCAA.

(145) “Total Reduced Sulfur” or “TRS” means the sum of the sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, and any other organic sulfides present expressed as hydrogen sulfide (H2S).

(146) “Typically Achievable Control Technology” or “TACT” means the emission limit established on a case-by-case basis for a criteria pollutant from a particular emissions unit in accordance with OAR 340-226-0130. For existing sources, the emission limit established will be typical of the emission level achieved by emissions units similar in type and size. For new and modified sources, the emission limit established will be typical of the emission level achieved by well controlled new or modified emissions units similar in type and size that were recently installed. TACT determinations will be based on information known to the Department while considering pollution prevention, impacts on other environmental media, energy impacts, capital and operating costs, cost effectiveness, and the age and remaining economic life of existing emission control equipment. The Department may consider emission control technologies typically applied to other types of emissions units where such technologies could be readily applied to the emissions unit. If an emission limitation is not feasible, a design, equipment, work practice, operational standard, or combination thereof, may be required.

(147) “Unassigned Emissions” means the amount of emissions that are in excess of the PSEL but less than the Netting Basis.

(148) “Unavoidable” or “could not be avoided” means events that are not caused entirely or in part by poor or inadequate design, operation, maintenance, or any other preventable condition in either process or control equipment.

(149) “Upset” or “Breakdown” means any failure or malfunction of any pollution control equipment or operating equipment that may cause excess emissions.

(150) “Visibility Impairment” means any humanly perceptible change in visual range, contrast or coloration from that which existed under natural conditions. Natural conditions include fog, clouds, windblown dust, rain, sand, naturally ignited wildfires, and natural aerosols.

(151) “Volatile Organic Compounds” or “VOC” means any compound of carbon, excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides or carbonates, and ammonium carbonate, that participates in atmospheric photochemical reactions.

(a) This includes any such organic compound except the following, which have been determined to have negligible photochemical reactivity in the formation of tropospheric ozone: methane; ethane; methylene chloride(dichloromethane); dimethyl carbonate, propylene carbonate, 1,1,1-trichloroethane(methyl chloroform); 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane(CFC-113); trichlorofluoromethane(CFC-11); dichlorodifluoromethane(CFC-12); chlorodifluoromethane(HCFC-22); trifluoromethane(HFC-23); 1,2-dichloro-1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane (CFC-114); chloropentafluoroethane(CFC-115); 1,1,1-trifluoro 2,2-dichloroethane(HCFC-123); 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane(HFC-134a); 1,1-dichloro 1-fluoroethane(HCFC-141b); 1-chloro 1,1-difluoroethane(HCFC-142b); 2-chloro-1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane(HCFC-124); pentafluoroethane(HFC-125); 1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane(HFC-134); 1,1,1-trifluoroethane(HFC-143a); 1,1-difluoroethane (HFC-152a); parachlorobenzotrifluoride(PCBTF); cyclic, branched, or linear completely methylated siloxanes; acetone; perchloroethylene(tetrachloroethylene); 3,3-dichloro-1,1,1,2,2-pentafluoropropane(HCFC-225ca); 1,3-dichloro-1,1,2,2,3-pentafluoropropane (HCFC-225cb); 1,1,1,2,3,4,4,5,5,5-decafluoropentane HFC 43-10mee); difluoromethane(HFC-32); ethylfluoride(HFC-161); 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoropropane(HFC-236fa); 1,1,2,2,3-pentafluoropropane(HFC-245ca); 1,1,2,3,3-pentafluoropropane(HFC-245ea); 1,1,1,2,3-pentafluoropropane(HFC-245eb); 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluoropropane(HFC-245fa); 1,1,1,2,3,3-hexafluoropropane(HFC-236ea); 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluorobutane(HFC-365mfc); chlorofluoromethane (HCFC-31); 1 chloro-1-fluoroethane(HCFC-151a); 1,2-dichloro-1,1,2-trifluoroethane(HCFC-123a); 1,1,1,2,2,3,3,4,4-nonafluoro-4-methoxy-butane(C4F9OCH3 or HFE-7100); 2-(difluoromethoxymethyl)-1,1,1,2,3,3,3-heptafluoropropane((CF3)2CFCF2OCH3); 1-ethoxy-1,1,2,2,3,3,4,4,4-nonafluorobutane(C4F9OC2H5 or HFE-7200); 2-(ethoxydifluoromethyl)-1,1,1,2,3,3,3-heptafluoropropane ((CF3)2CFCF2OC2H5); methyl acetate; 1,1,1,2,2,3,3-heptafluoro-3-methoxy-propane(n-C3F7OCH3, HFE-7000); 3-ethoxy-1,1,1,2,3, 4,4,5,5,6,6,6-dodecafluoro-2-(trifluoromethyl) hexane(HFE-7500); 1,1,1,2,3,3,3-heptafluoropropane(HFC 227ea); methyl formate (HCOOCH3); (1) 1,1,1,2,2,3,4,5,5,5-decafluoro-3-methoxy-4-trifluoromethyl-pentane(HFE-7300); and perfluorocarbon compounds that fall into these classes:

(A) Cyclic, branched, or linear, completely fluorinated alkanes;

(B) Cyclic, branched, or linear, completely fluorinated ethers with no unsaturations;

(C) Cyclic, branched, or linear, completely fluorinated tertiary amines with no unsaturations; and

(D) Sulfur containing perfluorocarbons with no unsaturations and with sulfur bonds only to carbon and fluorine.

(b) For purposes of determining compliance with emissions limits, VOC will be measured by an applicable reference method in accordance with the Department’s Source Sampling Manual, January, 1992. Where such a method also measures compounds with negligible photochemical reactivity, these negligibly-reactive compounds may be excluded as VOC if the amount of such compounds is accurately quantified, and the Department approves the exclusion.

(c) The Department may require an owner or operator to provide monitoring or testing methods and results demonstrating, to the Department’s satisfaction, the amount of negligibly-reactive compounds in the source’s emissions.

(d) The following compound(s) are VOC for purposes of all recordkeeping, emissions reporting, photochemical dispersion modeling and inventory requirements which apply to VOC and must be uniquely identified in emission reports, but are not VOC for purposes of VOC emissions limitations or VOC content requirements: t-butyl acetate.

(152) “Year” means any consecutive 12 month period of time.

NOTE: This rule is included in the State of Oregon Clean Air Act Implementation Plan as adopted by the EQC under OAR 340-200-0040.

[ED. NOTE: Tables referenced are available from the agency.]

[Publications: Publications referenced are available from the agency.]

Stat. Auth.: ORS 468.020, 468A.025, 468A.035, 468A.055 & 468A.070
Stats. Implemented: ORS 468A.025 & 468A.035
Hist.: [DEQ 15-1978, f. & ef. 10-13-78; DEQ 4-1993, f. & cert. ef. 3-10-93; DEQ 47, f. 8-31-72, ef. 9-15-72; DEQ 63, f. 12-20-73, ef. 1-11-74; DEQ 107, f. & ef. 1-6-76; Renumbered from 340-020-0033.04; DEQ 25-1981, f. & ef. 9-8-81; DEQ 5-1983, f. & ef. 4-18-83; DEQ 18-1984, f. & ef. 10-16-84; DEQ 8-1988, f. & cert. ef. 5-19-88 (and corrected 5-31-88); DEQ 14-1989, f. & cert. ef. 6-26-89; DEQ 42-1990, f. 12-13-90, cert. ef. 1-2-91; DEQ 2-1992, f. & cert. ef. 1-30-92; DEQ 7-1992, f. & cert. ef. 3-30-92; DEQ 27-1992, f. & cert. ef. 11-12-92; DEQ 4-1993, f. & cert. ef. 3-10-93; DEQ 12-1993, f. & cert. ef. 9-24-93, Renumbered from 340-020-0145, 340-020-0225, 340-020-0305, 340-020-0355, 340-020-0460 & 340-020-0520; DEQ 19-1993, f. & cert. ef. 11-4-93; DEQ 20-1993(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 11-4-93; DEQ 13-1994, f. & cert. ef. 5-19-94; DEQ 21-1994, f. & cert. ef. 10-14-94; DEQ 24-1994, f. & cert. ef. 10-28-94; DEQ 10-1995, f. & cert. ef. 5-1-95; DEQ 12-1995, f. & cert. ef. 5-23-95; DEQ 22-1995, f. & cert. ef. 10-6-95; DEQ 19-1996, f. & cert. ef. 9-24-96; DEQ 22-1996, f. & cert. ef. 10-22-96; DEQ 9-1997, f. & cert. ef. 5-9-97; DEQ 14-1998, f. & cert. ef. 9-14-98; DEQ 16-1998, f. & cert. ef. 9-23-98; DEQ 21-1998, f. & cert. ef. 10-14-98; DEQ 1-1999, f. & cert. ef. 1-25-99; DEQ 6-1999, f. & cert. ef. 5-21-99]; DEQ 14-1999, f. & cert. ef. 10-14-99, Renumbered from 340-020-0205, 340-028-0110; DEQ 6-2001, f. 6-18-01, cert. ef. 7-1-01; DEQ 2-2005, f. & cert. ef. 2-10-05; DEQ 2-2006, f. & cert. ef. 3-14-06; DEQ 6-2007(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 8-17-07 thru 2-12-08; DEQ 8-2007, f. & cert. ef. 11-8-07; DEQ 10-2008, f. & cert. ef. 8-25-08; DEQ 5-2010, f. & cert. ef. 5-21-10; DEQ 10-2010(Temp), f. 8-31-10, cert. ef. 9-1-10 thru 2-28-11; Administrative correction 3-29-11; DEQ 5-2011, f. 4-29-11, cert. ef. 5-1-11; DEQ 7-2011(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 6-24-11 thru 12-19-11; Administrative correction, 2-6-12; DEQ 1-2012, f. & cert. ef. 5-17-12

340-200-0040

State of Oregon Clean Air Act Implementation Plan

(1) This implementation plan, consisting of Volumes 2 and 3 of the State of Oregon Air Quality Control Program, contains control strategies, rules and standards prepared by the Department of Environmental Quality and is adopted as the state implementation plan (SIP) of the State of Oregon pursuant to the federal Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C.A 7401 to 7671q.

(2) Except as provided in section (3), revisions to the SIP will be made pursuant to the Commission’s rulemaking procedures in division 11 of this chapter and any other requirements contained in the SIP and will be submitted to the United States Environmental Protection Agency for approval. The State Implementation Plan was last modified by the Commission on February 16, 2012.

(3) Notwithstanding any other requirement contained in the SIP, the Department may:

(a) Submit to the Environmental Protection Agency any permit condition implementing a rule that is part of the federally-approved SIP as a source-specific SIP revision after the Department has complied with the public hearings provisions of 40 CFR 51.102 (July 1, 2002); and

(b) Approve the standards submitted by a regional authority if the regional authority adopts verbatim any standard that the Commission has adopted, and submit the standards to EPA for approval as a SIP revision.

NOTE: Revisions to the State of Oregon Clean Air Act Implementation Plan become federally enforceable upon approval by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. If any provision of the federally approved Implementation Plan conflicts with any provision adopted by the Commission, the Department shall enforce the more stringent provision.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 468.020, 468A.035 & 468A.070
Stats. Implemented: ORS 468A.035
Hist.: DEQ 35, f. 2-3-72, ef. 2-15-72; DEQ 54, f. 6-21-73, ef. 7-1-73; DEQ 19-1979, f. & ef. 6-25-79; DEQ 21-1979, f. & ef. 7-2-79; DEQ 22-1980, f. & ef. 9-26-80; DEQ 11-1981, f. & ef. 3-26-81; DEQ 14-1982, f. & ef. 7-21-82; DEQ 21-1982, f. & ef. 10-27-82; DEQ 1-1983, f. & ef. 1-21-83; DEQ 6-1983, f. & ef. 4-18-83; DEQ 18-1984, f. & ef. 10-16-84; DEQ 25-1984, f. & ef. 11-27-84; DEQ 3-1985, f. & ef. 2-1-85; DEQ 12-1985, f. & ef. 9-30-85; DEQ 5-1986, f. & ef. 2-21-86; DEQ 10-1986, f. & ef. 5-9-86; DEQ 20-1986, f. & ef. 11-7-86; DEQ 21-1986, f. & ef. 11-7-86; DEQ 4-1987, f. & ef. 3-2-87; DEQ 5-1987, f. & ef. 3-2-87; DEQ 8-1987, f. & ef. 4-23-87; DEQ 21-1987, f. & ef. 12-16-87; DEQ 31-1988, f. 12-20-88, cert. ef. 12-23-88; DEQ 2-1991, f. & cert. ef. 2-14-91; DEQ 19-1991, f. & cert. ef. 11-13-91; DEQ 20-1991, f. & cert. ef. 11-13-91; DEQ 21-1991, f. & cert. ef. 11-13-91; DEQ 22-1991, f. & cert. ef. 11-13-91; DEQ 23-1991, f. & cert. ef. 11-13-91; DEQ 24-1991, f. & cert. ef. 11-13-91; DEQ 25-1991, f. & cert. ef. 11-13-91; DEQ 1-1992, f. & cert. ef. 2-4-92; DEQ 3-1992, f. & cert. ef. 2-4-92; DEQ 7-1992, f. & cert. ef. 3-30-92; DEQ 19-1992, f. & cert. ef. 8-11-92; DEQ 20-1992, f. & cert. ef. 8-11-92; DEQ 25-1992, f. 10-30-92, cert. ef. 11-1-92; DEQ 26-1992, f. & cert. ef. 11-2-92; DEQ 27-1992, f. & cert. ef. 11-12-92; DEQ 4-1993, f. & cert. ef. 3-10-93; DEQ 8-1993, f. & cert. ef. 5-11-93; DEQ 12-1993, f. & cert. ef. 9-24-93; DEQ 15-1993, f. & cert. ef. 11-4-93; DEQ 16-1993, f. & cert. ef. 11-4-93; DEQ 17-1993, f. & cert. ef. 11-4-93; DEQ 19-1993, f. & cert. ef. 11-4-93; DEQ 1-1994, f. & cert. ef. 1-3-94; DEQ 5-1994, f. & cert. ef. 3-21-94; DEQ 14-1994, f. & cert. ef. 5-31-94; DEQ 15-1994, f. 6-8-94, cert. ef. 7-1-94; DEQ 25-1994, f. & cert. ef. 11-2-94; DEQ 9-1995, f. & cert. ef. 5-1-95; DEQ 10-1995, f. & cert. ef. 5-1-95; DEQ 14-1995, f. & cert. ef. 5-25-95; DEQ 17-1995, f. & cert. ef. 7-12-95; DEQ 19-1995, f. & cert. ef. 9-1-95; DEQ 20-1995 (Temp), f. & cert. ef. 9-14-95; DEQ 8-1996(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 6-3-96; DEQ 15-1996, f. & cert. ef. 8-14-96; DEQ 19-1996, f. & cert. ef. 9-24-96; DEQ 22-1996, f. & cert. ef. 10-22-96; DEQ 23-1996, f. & cert. ef. 11-4-96; DEQ 24-1996, f. & cert. ef. 11-26-96; DEQ 10-1998, f. & cert. ef. 6-22-98; DEQ 15-1998, f. & cert. ef. 9-23-98; DEQ 16-1998, f. & cert. ef. 9-23-98; DEQ 17-1998, f. & cert. ef. 9-23-98; DEQ 20-1998, f. & cert. ef. 10-12-98; DEQ 21-1998, f. & cert. ef. 10-12-98; DEQ 1-1999, f. & cert. ef. 1-25-99; DEQ 5-1999, f. & cert. ef. 3-25-99; DEQ 6-1999, f. & cert. ef. 5-21-99; DEQ 10-1999, f. & cert. ef. 7-1-99; DEQ 14-1999, f. & cert. ef. 10-14-99, Renumbered from 340-020-0047; DEQ 15-1999, f. & cert. ef. 10-22-99; DEQ 2-2000, f. 2-17-00, cert. ef. 6-1-01; DEQ 6-2000, f. & cert. ef. 5-22-00; DEQ 8-2000, f. & cert. ef. 6-6-00; DEQ 13-2000, f. & cert. ef. 7-28-00; DEQ 16-2000, f. & cert. ef. 10-25-00; DEQ 17-2000, f. & cert. ef. 10-25-00; DEQ 20-2000 f. & cert. ef. 12-15-00; DEQ 21-2000, f. & cert. ef. 12-15-00; DEQ 2-2001, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-01; DEQ 4-2001, f. & cert. ef. 3-27-01; DEQ 6-2001, f. 6-18-01, cert. ef. 7-1-01; DEQ 15-2001, f. & cert. ef. 12-26-01; DEQ 16-2001, f. & cert. ef. 12-26-01; DEQ 17-2001, f. & cert. ef. 12-28-01; DEQ 4-2002, f. & cert. ef. 3-14-02; DEQ 5-2002, f. & cert. ef. 5-3-02; DEQ 11-2002, f. & cert. ef. 10-8-02; DEQ 5-2003, f. & cert. ef. 2-6-03; DEQ 14-2003, f. & cert. ef. 10-24-03; DEQ 19-2003, f. & cert. ef. 12-12-03; DEQ 1-2004, f. & cert. ef. 4-14-04; DEQ 10-2004, f. & cert. ef. 12-15-04; DEQ 1-2005, f. & cert. ef. 1-4-05; DEQ 2-2005, f. & cert. ef. 2-10-05; DEQ 4-2005, f. 5-13-05, cert. ef. 6-1-05; DEQ 7-2005, f. & cert. ef. 7-12-05; DEQ 9-2005, f. & cert. ef. 9-9-05; DEQ 2-2006, f. & cert. ef. 3-14-06; DEQ 4-2006, f. 3-29-06, cert. ef. 3-31-06; DEQ 3-2007, f. & cert. ef. 4-12-07; DEQ 4-2007, f. & cert. ef. 6-28-07; DEQ 8-2007, f. & cert. ef. 11-8-07; DEQ 5-2008, f. & cert. ef. 3-20-08; DEQ 11-2008, f. & cert. ef. 8-29-08; DEQ 12-2008, f. & cert. ef. 9-17-08; DEQ 14-2008, f. & cert. ef. 11-10-08; DEQ 15-2008, f. & cert. ef 12-31-08; DEQ 3-2009, f. & cert. ef. 6-30-09; DEQ 8-2009, f. & cert. ef. 12-16-09; DEQ 2-2010, f. & cert. ef. 3-5-10; DEQ 5-2010, f. & cert. ef. 5-21-10; DEQ 14-2010, f. & cert. ef. 12-10-10; DEQ 1-2011, f. & cert. ef. 2-24-11; DEQ 2-2011, f. 3-10-11, cert. ef. 3-15-11; DEQ 5-2011, f. 4-29-11, cert. ef. 5-1-11; DEQ 18-2011, f. & cert. ef. 12-21-11; DEQ 1-2012, f. & cert. ef. 5-17-12

340-210-0100

Registration in General

(1) Any air contaminant source not subject to Air Contaminant Discharge Permits, OAR 340 division 216, or Oregon Title V Operating Permits, OAR 340 division 218, must register with the Department upon request pursuant to OAR 340-210-0110 through 340-210-0120.

(2) The owner or operator of an air contaminant source listed in subsection (2)(a) of this rule that is certified through a Department approved environmental certification program and subject to an Area Source NESHAP may register the source with the Department pursuant to OAR 340-210-0110 through 340-210-0120 in lieu of obtaining a permit in accordance with OAR 340-216-0020, unless the Department determines that the source has not complied with the requirements of the environmental certification program.

(a) The following air contaminant sources may be registered under this section:

(A) Motor vehicle surface coating operations.

(B) Dry cleaners using perchloroethylene.

(b) Approved environmental certification program. To be approved, the environmental certification program must, at a minimum, require certified air contaminant sources to comply with all applicable state and federal rules and regulations and require additional measures to increase environmental protection.

(c) Fees. In order to obtain and maintain registration, owners and operators of air contaminant sources registered pursuant to this section must pay the following annual fees by March 1 of each year:

(A) Motor vehicle surface coating operations — $240.00.

(B) Dry cleaners using perchloroethylene — $180.00.

(C) Late fees.

(i) 30 days late: 5% of annual fee.

(ii) 31-60 days late: 10% of annual fee.

(iii) 61 or more days late: 20% of annual fee.

(D) Failure to pay fees. Registration is automatically terminated upon failure to pay annual fees within 90 days of invoice by the Department, unless prior arrangements for payment have been approved in writing by the Department.

(d) Recordkeeping. In order to maintain registration, owners and operators of air contaminant sources registered pursuant to this section must maintain records required by the approved environmental performance program under subsection (2)(b) of this rule. The records must be kept on site and in a form suitable and readily available for expeditious inspection and review.

(3) The owner or operator of an air contaminant source that is subject to a federal NSPS or NESHAP in 40 CFR Part 60 or 40 CFR Part 63 and that is not located at a source that is required to obtain a permit under OAR chapter 340, division 216 (Air Contaminant Discharge Permits) or OAR chapter 340, division 218 (Oregon Title V Operating Permits), must register and maintain registration with the Department pursuant to OAR 340-210-0110 through 340-210-0120 if requested in writing by the Department (or by EPA at the Department’s request).

(4) Revocation. The Department may revoke a registration if a source fails to meet any requirement in OAR 340-210-0110.

NOTE: This rule is included in the State of Oregon Clean Air Act Implementation Plan as adopted by the EQC under OAR 340-200-0040.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 468.020, 468A.025, 468A.035, 468A.050, 468A.070 & 468A.310
Stats. Implemented: ORS 468 & 468A
Hist.: DEQ 15, f. 6-12-70, ef. 9-1-70; DEQ 4-1993, f. & cert. ef. 3-10-93; DEQ 12-1993, f. & cert. ef. 9-24-93, Renumbered from 340-020-0005; DEQ 14-1999, f. & cert. ef. 10-14-99, Renumbered from 340-028-0500; DEQ 6-2001, f. 6-18-01, cert. ef. 7-1-01; DEQ 8-2009, f. & cert. ef. 12-16-09; DEQ 7-2011(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 6-24-11 thru 12-19-11; Administrative correction, 2-6-12; DEQ 1-2012, f. & cert. ef. 5-17-12

340-210-0110

Registration Requirements

(1) Registration pursuant to OAR 340-210-0100(1) or (3) must be completed within 30 days following the mailing date of the request by the Department.

(2) Registration must be completed by the owner, lessee of the source, or agent on forms made available by the Department. If a form is not available from the Department, the registrant may provide the information using a format approved by the Department.

(3) In order to obtain registration pursuant to OAR 340-210-0100(1), the following information must be reported by registrants:

(a) Name, address, and nature of business;

(b) Name of local person responsible for compliance with these rules;

(c) Name of person authorized to receive requests for data and information;

(d) A description of the production processes and a related flow chart;

(e) A plot plan showing the location and height of all air contaminant sources. The plot plan must also indicate the nearest residential or commercial property;

(f) Type and quantity of fuels used;

(g) Amount, nature, and duration of air contaminant emissions;

(h) Estimated efficiency of air pollution control equipment under present or anticipated operating conditions;

(i) Any other information requested by the Department.

(4) In order to obtain registration pursuant to OAR 340-210-0100(2), a registrant must submit the information in section (3)(a), (b), (c), and (i) of this rule and the following:

(a) Information demonstrating that the air contaminant source is operating in compliance with all applicable state and federal rules and regulations, as requested by the Department.

(b) Information demonstrating that the source is certified through an approved environmental certification program.

(c) A signed statement that the submitted information is true, accurate, and complete. This signed statement shall state that, based on information and belief formed after reasonable inquiry, the statements and information in the document are true, accurate, and complete.

(5) In order to obtain registration pursuant to OAR 340-210-0100(3), the following must be submitted by a registrant:

(a) Name, address and nature of business or institution;

(b) Name of local person responsible for compliance with these rules;

(c) Name of person authorized to receive requests for data and information;

(d) A description of the air contaminant source subject to regulation;

(e) Identification of the applicable regulation(s);

(f) Confirmation that approval to construct and operate the air contaminant source was obtained in accordance with OAR 340-210-0205 through 340-0210-0250;

(g) Confirmation that the air contaminant source is operating in compliance with all applicable state rules and regulations, including but not limited to OAR 340-208-0110 (visible air contaminant limitations) and 340-226-0210 or 340-228-0210 (grain loading standards);

(h) Confirmation that the air contaminant source is operating in compliance with all applicable federal rules and regulations, including but not limited to 40 CFR Part 60 and Part 63 standards and work practice requirements, such as routine tune-up for boilers; and

(i) Any other information requested by the Department.

NOTE: This rule is included in the State of Oregon Clean Air Act Implementation Plan as adopted by the EQC under OAR 340-200-0040.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 468.020, 468A.025, 468A.035, 468A.050, 468A.055, 468A.070 & 468A.310
Stats. Implemented: ORS 468 & 468A
Hist.: DEQ 15, f. 6-12-70, ef. 9-1-70; DEQ 4-1993, f. & cert. ef. 3-10-93; DEQ 12-1993, f. & cert. ef. 9-24-93, Renumbered from 340-020-0010; DEQ 14-1999, f. & cert. ef. 10-14-99, Renumbered from 340-028-0510; DEQ 6-2001, f. 6-18-01, cert. ef. 7-1-01; DEQ 8-2009, f. & cert. ef. 12-16-09; DEQ 7-2011(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 6-24-11 thru 12-19-11; Administrative correction, 2-6-12; DEQ 1-2012, f. & cert. ef. 5-17-12

340-210-0120

Re-Registration and Maintaining Registration

(1) In order to re-register or maintain registration pursuant to OAR 340-210-0100, a person responsible for an air contaminant source must reaffirm in writing, by March 1 of each year, the correctness and current status of the information furnished to the Department.

(2) In order to re-register or maintain registration pursuant to OAR 340-210-0100(3):

(a) The registrant must report any change in any of the factual information reported under OAR 340-210-0110 to the Department on a form made available by the Department; and

(b) The registrant must confirm the compliance status of the air contaminant source, including but not limited to compliance with any work practice requirements such as routine tune-ups. Confirmation must be made in writing on a form furnished by the Department.

(3) In order to re-register, or maintain registration, a person must not have had their registration terminated or revoked within the last 3 years, unless the air contaminant source has changed ownership since termination or revocation.

(4) If a registered air contaminant source is sold or transferred, the sale or transfer must be reported to the Department by either the former owner or the new owner within 30 days of the date of sale or transfer. The new owner of the registered air contaminant source must register the air contaminant source within 30 days of the date of sale or transfer in accordance with OAR 340-210-0110(2) and (5).

NOTE: This rule is included in the State of Oregon Clean Air Act Implementation Plan as adopted by the EQC under OAR 340-200-0040.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 468.020, 468A.035, 468A.050 & 468A.310
Stats. Implemented: ORS 468 & 468A
Hist.: DEQ 15, f. 6-12-70, ef. 9-1-70; DEQ 4-1993, f. & cert. ef. 3-10-93; DEQ 12-1993, f. & cert. ef. 9-24-93, Renumbered from 340-020-0015; DEQ 14-1999, f. & cert. ef. 10-14-99, Renumbered from 340-028-0520; DEQ 6-2001, f. 6-18-01, cert. ef. 7-1-01; DEQ 8-2009, f. & cert. ef. 12-16-09; DEQ 7-2011(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 6-24-11 thru 12-19-11; Administrative correction, 2-6-12; DEQ 1-2012, f. & cert. ef. 5-17-12

340-210-0250

Approval to Operate

(1) The approval to construct does not provide approval to operate the constructed or modified stationary source or air pollution control equipment unless otherwise allowed by section (2) of this rule or the ACDP or Oregon Title V Operating Permit programs (OAR 340 divisions 216 and 218).

(2) Type 1 and 2 changes:

(a) For sources that are not required to obtain a permit in accordance with OAR 340-216-0020, Type 1 and 2 changes may be operated without further approval subject to the conditions of the Department’s approval to construct provided in accordance with OAR 340-210-0240.

(A) Approval to operate does not relieve the owner of the obligation of complying with applicable requirements that may include but are not limited to the general opacity standards in OAR 340-208-0110 and general particulate matter standards in OAR 340-226-0210 and 340-228-0210.

(B) If required by the Department as a condition of the approval to construct or at any other time in accordance with OAR 340-212-0120, the owner or operator must conduct testing or monitoring to verify compliance with applicable requirements. Testing of boilers must be performed in accordance with OAR 340-212-0140.

(C) The owner or operator must register the air contaminant source with the Department if required as a condition of the approval to construct or at any other time in accordance with OAR 340-210-0100.

(b) For new sources that are required to obtain an ACDP in accordance with OAR 340-216-0020, the ACDP, which allows operation, is required before operating Type 1 or 2 changes.

(c) For sources currently operating under an ACDP, Type 1 and 2 changes may be operated without further approval unless the ACDP specifically prohibits the operation.

(d) For sources currently operating under an Oregon Title V Operating Permit, Type 1 and 2 changes may only be operated in accordance with OAR 340-218-0190(2).

(3) Type 3 and 4 changes:

(a) For new sources, Type 3 or 4 changes require a standard ACDP before operation of the changes.

(b) For sources currently operating under an ACDP, approval to operate Type 3 or 4 changes will require a new or modified standard ACDP. All ACDP terms and conditions remain in effect until the ACDP is modified.

(c) For sources currently operating under an Oregon Title V Operating Permit, approval to operate Type 3 or 4 changes must be in accordance with OAR 340-218-0190(2).

NOTE: This rule is included in the State of Oregon Clean Air Act Implementation Plan as adopted by the EQC under OAR 340-200-0040.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 468 & 468A
Stats. Implemented: ORS 468 & 468A
Hist.: DEQ 6-2001, f. 6-18-01, cert. ef. 7-1-01; DEQ 1-2012, f. & cert. ef. 5-17-12

340-228-0020

Definitions

The definitions in OAR 340-200-0020 and this rule apply to this division. If the same term is defined in this rule and OAR 340-200-0020, the definition in this rule applies to this division.

(1) “ASTM” means the American Society for Testing and Materials.

(2) “Coastal Areas” means Clatsop, Tillamook, Lincoln, Coos, and Curry Counties and those portions of Douglas and Lane County west of Range 8 West, Willamette Meridian.

(3) “Distillate Fuel Oil” means any oil meeting the specifications of ASTM Grade 1 or 2 fuel oils;

(4) “Fuel burning equipment” means equipment, other than internal combustion engines, the principal purpose of which is to produce heat or power by indirect heat transfer.

(5) “Residual Fuel Oil” means any oil meeting the specifications of ASTM Grade 4, 5, or 6 fuel oils.

(6) “Standard conditions” means a temperature of 68° Fahrenheit and a pressure of 14.7 pounds per square inch absolute.

(7) “Standard cubic foot” means the amount of gas that would occupy a volume of one cubic foot, if the gas were free of uncombined water at standard conditions. When applied to combustion flue gases from fuel or refuse burning, “standard cubic foot” also implies adjustment of gas volume to that which would result at a concentration of 12% carbon dioxide or 50% excess air.

NOTE: This rule is included in the State of Oregon Clean Air Act Implementation Plan as adopted by the Environmental Quality Commission under OAR 340-200-0040.

[Publications: Publications referenced are available from the agency.]

Stat. Auth.: ORS 468 & 468A
Stats. Implemented: ORS 468.020,468A.025 & 468A.035
Hist.: [DEQ 16, f. 6-12-70, ef. 7-11-70; DEQ 1-1984, f. & ef. 1-16-84; DEQ 4-1993, f. & cert. ef. 3-10-93; DEQ 3-1996, f. & cert. ef. 1-29-96]; [DEQ 37, f. 2-15-72, ef. 3-1-72; DEQ 4-1993, f. & cert. ef. 3-10-93]; [DEQ 37, f. 2-15-72, ef. 3-1-72; DEQ 4-1993, f. & cert. ef. 3-10-93]; DEQ 14-1999, f. & cert. ef. 10-14-99, Renumbered from 340-021-0005, 340-022-0005, 340-022-0050; DEQ 8-2007, f. & cert. ef. 11-8-07; DEQ 7-2011(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 6-24-11 thru 12-19-11; Administrative correction, 2-6-12; DEQ 1-2012, f. & cert. ef. 5-17-12

340-228-0200

Sulfur Dioxide Standards

The following emission standards are applicable to sources installed, constructed, or modified after January 1, 1972 only:

(1) For fuel burning equipment having a heat input capacity between 150 million BTU per hour and 250 million BTU, no person may cause, suffer, allow, or permit the emission into the atmosphere of sulfur dioxide in excess of:

(a) 1.4 lb. per million BTU heat input, maximum three-hour average, when liquid fuel is burned;

(b) 1.6 lb. per million BTU heat input, maximum three-hour average, when solid fuel is burned.

(2) For fuel burning equipment having a heat input capacity of more than 250 million BTU per hour, no person may cause, suffer, allow, or permit the emission into the atmosphere of sulfur dioxide in excess of:

(a) 0.8 lb. per million BTU heat input, maximum three-hour average, when liquid fuel is burned;

(b) 1.2 lb. per million BTU heat input, maximum three-hour average, when solid fuel is burned.

NOTE: This rule is included in the State of Oregon Clean Air Act Implementation Plan as adopted by the Environmental Quality Commission under OAR 340-200-0040.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 468 & 468A
Stats. Implemented: ORS 468.020,468A.025, 468A.035 & 468A.055
Hist.: DEQ 37, f. 2-15-72, ef. 3-1-72; DEQ 4-1993, f. & cert. ef. 3-10-93; DEQ 22-1996, f. & cert. ef. 10-22-96; DEQ 14-1999, f. & cert. ef. 10-14-99, Renumbered from 340-022-0055; DEQ 8-2007, f. & cert. ef. 11-8-07; DEQ 7-2011(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 6-24-11 thru 12-19-11; Administrative correction, 2-6-12; DEQ 1-2012, f. & cert. ef. 5-17-12

340-228-0210

Grain Loading Standards

(1) Except as provided in sections (2) and (3) of this rule, no person shall cause, suffer, allow, or permit the emission of particulate matter, from any fuel burning equipment in excess of:

(a) 0.2 grains per standard cubic foot for sources installed, constructed, or modified on or before June 1, 1970;

(b) 0.1 grains per standard cubic foot for sources installed, constructed, or modified after June 1, 1970.

(2) For sources burning salt laden wood waste on July 1, 1981, where salt in the fuel is the only reason for failure to comply with the above limits and when the salt in the fuel results from storage or transportation of logs in salt water, the resulting salt portion of the emissions shall be exempted from subsection (1)(a) or (b) of this rule and OAR 340-208-0110. In no case shall sources burning salt laden woodwaste exceed 0.6 grains per standard cubic foot.

(a) This exemption and the alternative emissions standard are only applicable upon prior notice to the Department.

(b) Sources which utilize this exemption, to demonstrate compliance otherwise with subsection (1)(a) or (b) of this rule, shall submit the results of a particulate emissions source test of the boiler stacks bi-annually.

(3) This rule does not apply to solid fuel burning devices that have been certified under OAR 340-262-0500.

NOTE: This rule is included in the State of Oregon Clean Air Act Implementation Plan as adopted by the Environmental Quality Commission under OAR 340-200-0040.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 468 & 468A
Stats. Implemented: ORS 468.020,468A.025 & 468A.035
Hist.: DEQ 16, f. 6-12-70, ef. 7-11-70; DEQ 12-1979, f. & ef. 6-8-79; DEQ 6-1981, f. & ef. 2-17-81; DEQ 18-1982, f. & ef. 9-1-82; DEQ 4-1993, f. & cert. ef. 3-10-93; DEQ 3-1996, f. & cert. ef. 1-29-96; DEQ 14-1999, f. & cert. ef. 10-14-99, Renumbered from 340-021-0020; DEQ 8-2007, f. & cert. ef. 11-8-07; DEQ 7-2011(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 6-24-11 thru 12-19-11; Administrative correction, 2-6-12; DEQ 1-2012, f. & cert. ef. 5-17-12

340-262-0450

Definitions

The definitions in OAR 340-200-0020 and this rule apply to this Division. If OAR 340-0200-0020 and this rule define the same term, the definition in this rule applies to this Division.

(1) “Antique woodstove” means a woodstove built before 1940 that has an ornate construction and a current market value substantially higher than a common woodstove manufactured during the same period.

(2) “Central wood-fired furnace” means an indoor, wood-fired furnace that is thermostatically controlled, has a dedicated cold air inlet and dedicated hot air outlet, and is connected to heating ductwork for the entire residential structure.

(3) “CFR” means Code of Federal Regulations.

(4) “Consumer” means a person who buys a solid fuel burning device for personal use.

(5) “Cookstove” means an indoor wood-burning appliance designed for the primary purpose of cooking food.

(6) “Dealer” means a person that sells solid fuel burning devices to retailers or other dealers for resale. For the purpose of this Division, a dealer that is also an Oregon retailer shall be considered to be only a retailer.

(7) “DEQ” means Oregon Department of Environmental Quality.

(8) “Destroy” means to demolish or decommission to the extent that restoration or reuse as a heating device is impossible.

(9) “EPA” means United States Environmental Protection Agency.

(10) “EQC” means Environmental Quality Commission

(11) “Federal Regulations” means 40 CFR, Part 60, Subpart AAA as in effect on July 1, 2010.

(12) “Fireplace” means a site-built or factory-built masonry fireplace that is designed to be used with an open combustion chamber and that is without features to control air-to-fuel ratios.

(13) “Hydronic heater” means a fuel-burning device which may be equipped with a heat storage unit, and which is designed to:

(a) Burn wood or other automatically fed fuels such as wood pellets, shelled corn, and wood chips;

(b) Be installed according to the manufacturer’s specifications either indoors or outdoors; and

(c) Heat building space and/or water via the distribution, typically through pipes, of a fluid heated in the device, typically water or a water/antifreeze mixture.

(14) “Manufacturer” means a person who designs a solid fuel burning device, constructs a solid fuel burning device or constructs parts for solid fuel burning devices.

(15) “Masonry heater” means a site-built or site-assembled, solid fueled heating device constructed of structural masonry mass used to store heat from intermittent fires burned rapidly in the structure’s firebox and slow release the heat to the site. Such solid-fueled heating device must meet the design and construction specifications set forth in ASTM E 1602-03, “Guide for Construction of Solid Fuel Burning Masonry Heaters.”

(16) “New solid fuel burning device” or “new device” means a solid fuel burning device defined under ORS 468A.485(4)(a) that has not been sold, bargained, exchanged, given away, acquired secondhand, or otherwise had its ownership transferred from the person who first acquired it from a retailer.

(17) “PM10” means particulate matter less than 10 microns.

(18) “PM2.5” means particulate matter less than 2.5 microns.

(19) “Pellet stove” means a heating device that uses wood pellets, or other biomass fuels designed for use in pellet stoves, as its primary source of fuel.

(20) “Phase 1 emission level qualified model” is a model of a hydronic heater that achieves an average emission level of 0.60 lbs/million Btu heat input or less for all fuel types listed in the owner’s manual and/or mentioned in marketing/sales materials, as acknowledged by EPA in writing to the manufacturer as part of EPA’s acceptance of the model as a qualified model.

(21) “Phase 2 emission level qualified model” is a model of a hydronic heater that achieves an average emissions level of 0.32 lbs/million Btu heat output or less for all fuel types listed in the owner’s manual and/or mentioned in marketing/sales materials, and that did not exceed 18.0 grams/hr of fine particles in any individual test run that was used in the calculation of the average, as acknowledged by EPA in writing to the manufacturer as part of EPA’s acceptance of the model as a qualified model pursuant to the EPA Hydronic Heater Program Phase 2 Partnership Agreement.

(22) “Residential structure” has the meaning given that term in ORS 701.005.

(23) “Retailer” means a person engaged in the sale of solid fuel burning devices directly to consumers.

(24) “Solid fuel burning device” or “device” means a woodstove or any other device that burns wood, coal or other nongaseous or non-liquid fuels for aesthetic, space-heating or water-heating purposes in or for a private residential structure or a commercial establishment and that has a heat output of less than one million British thermal units per hour. Solid fuel burning device does not include:

(a) Fireplaces;

(b) Antique stoves;

(c) Pellet stoves;

(d) Masonry heaters;

(e) Central, wood-fired furnaces;

(f) Saunas; and

(g) Boilers subject to 40 CFR part 63, subpart DDDDD or subpart JJJJJJ, as in effect on February 16, 2012 that obtain construction approval under OAR 340-210-0205 through 340-210-0250.

(25) “Trash burner” means any equipment that is used to dispose of waste by burning and has not been issued an air quality permit under ORS 468A.040.

(26) “Treated Wood” means wood of any species that has been chemically impregnated, painted or similarly modified to prevent weathering and deterioration.

(27) “Used solid fuel burning device” or “used device” means a solid fuel burning device that has been sold, bargained, exchanged, given away, or otherwise has had its ownership transferred.

NOTE: This rule is included in the State of Oregon Clean Air Act Implementation Plan as adopted by the Environmental Quality Commission under OAR 340-200-0040.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 468 & 468A
Stats. Implemented: ORS 468A.035 & 468A.460 - 468A.515
Hist.: DEQ 2-2011, f. 3-10-11, cert. ef. 3-15-11; DEQ 7-2011(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 6-24-11 thru 12-19-11; Administrative correction, 2-6-12; DEQ 1-2012, f. & cert. ef. 5-17-12

340-262-0600

New and Used Solid Fuel Burning Devices Sold in Oregon

(1) No person may advertise to sell, offer to sell or sell a new or used solid fuel burning device in Oregon unless:

(a) The device has been certified for sale as new by DEQ pursuant to OAR 340-262-0500, or by EPA pursuant to 40 CFR part 60, subpart AAA; and

(b) The device is permanently labeled as certified, or in the case of a hydronic heater is permanently labeled as a Phase 1 or Phase 2 emission level qualified model, with a label authorized by DEQ or EPA.

(2) Exempt devices. Cookstoves are exempt from this rule in addition to those devices that are not considered solid fuel burning devices as defined in OAR 340-262-0450(24).

(3) Exempt consumer transactions. Consumer transactions are exempt from this rule, if the consumer:

(a) Sells a used solid fuel burning device to a person in the business of reusing, reclaiming or recycling scrap metal and the person destroys the device; or

(b) Remits a used device to a retailer for a price reduction on a new residential heating system.

(4) Prohibited label alteration. No person may alter DEQ or EPA authorized labels.

NOTE: This rule is included in the State of Oregon Clean Air Act Implementation Plan as adopted by the Environmental Quality Commission under OAR 340-200-0040.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 468 & 468A
Stats. Implemented: ORS 468A.035 & 468A.460 - 468A.515
Hist.: DEQ 2-2011, f. 3-10-11, cert. ef. 3-15-11; DEQ 7-2011(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 6-24-11 thru 12-19-11; Administrative correction, 2-6-12; DEQ 1-2012, f. & cert. ef. 5-17-12


 

Rule Caption: Water Quality Certification Procedures for Klamath River Restoration Project.

Adm. Order No.: DEQ 2-2012

Filed with Sec. of State: 5-21-2012

Certified to be Effective: 5-21-12

Notice Publication Date: 11-1-2011

Rules Amended: 340-041-0185

Subject: The Environmental Quality Commission adopted a rule stating DEQ’s policy and procedures for evaluating whether to certify that the removal of J.C. Boyle dam on the Klamath River will comply with water quality standards. The U.S. Secretary of Interior will determine whether or not the dam should be removed. The rulemaking clarifies DEQ’s authority and intent to allow a time schedule for the dam removal to comply with water quality standards if DEQ can make the findings specified in the rule. Conditions will be placed in DEQ’s certification to protect water quality to the maximum extent practicable during the dam removal process and to ensure that the long term water quality and fish habitat improvements outweigh the expected short term water quality impacts.

Rules Coordinator: Maggie Vandehey—(503) 229-6878

340-041-0185

Water Quality Standards and Policies for this Basin

(1) pH (hydrogen ion concentration). pH values may not fall outside the following ranges:

(a) Fresh waters except Cascade lakes: pH values may not fall outside the range of 6.5-9.0. When greater than 25 percent of ambient measurements taken between June and September are greater than pH 8.7, and as resources are available according to priorities set by the Department, the Department will determine whether the values higher than 8.7 are anthropogenic or natural in origin;

(b) Cascade lakes above 5,000 feet altitude: pH values may not fall outside the range of 6.0 to 8.5.

(2) Temperature. From June 1 to September 30, no NPDES point source that discharges to the portion of the Klamath River designated for cool water species may cause the temperature of the water body to increase more than 0.3°C above the natural background after mixing with 25% of the stream flow. Natural background for the Klamath River means the temperature of the Klamath River at the outflow from Upper Klamath Lake plus any natural warming or cooling that occurs downstream. This criterion supersedes OAR 340-041-0028(9)(a) during the specified time period for NPDES permitted point sources.

(3) Total Dissolved Solids. Guide concentrations listed below may not be exceeded unless otherwise specifically authorized by DEQ upon such conditions as it may deem necessary to carry out the general intent of this plan and to protect the beneficial uses set forth in OAR 340-041-0180: main stem Klamath River from Klamath Lake to the Oregon-California Border (river miles 255 to 208.5): The specific conductance may not exceed 400 micro-ohms at 77°F when measured at the Oregon-California Border (river mile 208.5).

(4) Minimum Design Criteria for Treatment and Control of Sewage Wastes:

(a) During periods of low streams flows (approximately May 1 to October 31): Treatment resulting in monthly average effluent concentrations not to exceed 20 mg/l of BOD and 20 of suspended solids or equivalent control;

(b) During the period of high stream flows (approximately November 1 to April 30): A minimum of secondary treatment or equivalent control and unless otherwise specifically authorized by the Department, operation of all waste treatment and control facilities to maximum practicable efficient and effectiveness so as to minimize waste discharge to public waters.

(5) Time Schedule for Dam Removal.

(a) DEQ may issue a 401 Water Quality Certification for the federal license or permit authorizing the removal of J.C. Boyle Dam on the Klamath River that includes a time schedule for compliance with water quality standards, if DEQ makes the following findings:

(A) The dam removal and its associated water quality impacts will be of limited duration;

(B) The dam removal and related restoration activities will provide a net ecological benefit;

(C) The dam removal will be performed in a manner minimizing, to the maximum extent practicable, adverse impacts to water quality, threatened and endangered species, and beneficial uses of the Klamath River; and

(D) The dam removal, by the end of a specified time schedule, is not expected to cause an exceedance of a water quality standard set forth in this Division.

(b) Any 401 Water Quality Certification issued by DEQ for removal of J.C. Boyle Dam must:

(A) Be based on an application, evaluation, and public participation complying with OAR chapter 340 division 48; and

(B) Contain conditions ensuring that the dam removal:

(i) will be performed in accordance with interim milestones and a time schedule specified in the certification;

(ii) will be performed in a manner that, to the maximum practicable extent, minimizes adverse impacts to water quality, threatened and endangered species, and beneficial uses of the Klamath River (including the use of best practices and interim and post-removal protection, mitigation, and monitoring measures); and (iii) will not cause an exceedance of a water quality standard set forth in this Division by the end of the maximum period for meeting standards specified in the certification.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 468.020, 468B.030, 468B.035 & 468B.048
Stats. Implemented: ORS 468B.030, 468B.035 & 468B.048
Hist.: DEQ 17-2003, f. & cert. ef. 12-9-03; DEQ 1-2007, f. & cert. ef. 3-14-07; DEQ 2-2012, f. & cert .ef. 5-21-12


Rule Caption: Water Quality Standards Revision for the West Division Main Canal (Umatilla basin) near Hermiston, Oregon.

Adm. Order No.: DEQ 3-2012

Filed with Sec. of State: 5-21-2012

Certified to be Effective: 5-21-12

Notice Publication Date: 10-1-2011

Rules Amended: 340-041-0002, 340-041-0310, 340-041-0315

Subject: The rule revises water quality standards for the West Division Main Canal located near the City of Hermiston in the Umatilla basin. The rule revises the designated beneficial uses for the West Division Main Canal and establishes site-specific water quality criteria (numeric and narrative) for the canal that protect those uses. The canal is primarily a man-made, concrete lined irrigation water conveyance that is screened at both ends to prevent fish from entering the canal. The current beneficial uses were designated broadly for all streams in the Umatilla subbasin, including the canal. The rule removes uses that do not exist and are not feasibly attainable in the canal, including aquatic life, public and private domestic water supply and fishing. The rule establishes water quality standards based on the actual or possible uses of the canal: irrigation, livestock watering, water contact and modified aquatic habitat in the lower segment.

 The revised criteria are less stringent than the previous criteria. The new criteria will make discharge to the canal a feasible alternative for the City of Hermiston (indirect effect of rule). DEQ does not expect that the revisions to the water quality standards will result in a degradation of water quality within the canal; rather, the proposed revisions are intended to protect existing uses and water quality.

Rules Coordinator: Maggie Vandehey—(503) 229-6878

340-041-0002

Definitions

Definitions in this rule apply to all basins unless context requires otherwise.

(1) “401 Water Quality Certification” means a determination made by DEQ that a dredge and fill activity, private hydropower facility, or other federally licensed or permitted activity that may result in a discharge to waters of the state has adequate terms and conditions to prevent an exceedance of water quality criteria. The federal permit in question may not be issued without this state determination in accordance with the Federal Clean Water Act, section 401 (33 USC 1341).

(2) “Ambient Stream Temperature” means the stream temperature measured at a specific time and place. The selected location for measuring stream temperature must be representative of the stream in the vicinity of the point being measured.

(3) “Anthropogenic,” when used to describe “sources” or “warming,” means that which results from human activity;

(4) “Applicable Criteria” means the biologically based temperature criteria in OAR 340-041-0028(4), the superseding cold water protection criteria in OAR 340-041-0028(11), or the superseding natural condition criteria as described in OAR 340-041-0028(8). The applicable criteria may also be site-specific criteria approved by U.S. EPA. A subbasin may have a combination of applicable temperature criteria derived from some or all of these numeric and narrative criteria.

(5) “Appropriate Reference Site or Region” means a site on the same water body or within the same basin or ecoregion that has similar habitat conditions and represents the water quality and biological community attainable within the areas of concern.

(6) “Aquatic Species” means plants or animals that live at least part of their life cycle in waters of the state.

(7) “Basin” means a third-field hydrologic unit as identified by the U.S. Geological Survey.

(8) “BOD” means 5-day, 20°C Biochemical Oxygen Demand.

(9) “Cold-Water Aquatic Life” means aquatic organisms that are physiologically restricted to cold water, including but not limited to native salmon, steelhead, mountain whitefish, char (including bull trout), and trout.

(10) “Cold Water Refugia” means those portions of a water body where or times during the diel temperature cycle when the water temperature is at least 2 degrees Celsius colder than the daily maximum temperature of the adjacent well-mixed flow of the water body.

(11) “Commission” means the Oregon Environmental Quality Commission.

(12) “Cool-Water Aquatic Life” means aquatic organisms that are physiologically restricted to cool waters, including but not limited to native sturgeon, Pacific lamprey, suckers, chub, sculpins, and certain species of cyprinids (minnows).

(13) “Core Cold-Water Habitat Use” means waters that are expected to maintain temperatures within the range generally considered optimal for salmon and steelhead rearing, or that are suitable for bull trout migration, foraging, and sub-adult rearing that occurs during the summer. These uses are designated on the following subbasin maps set out at OAR 340-041-0101 to 340-041-0340: Figures 130A, 151A, 160A, 170A, 180A, 201A, 220A, 230A, 271A, 286A, 300A, 310A, 320A, and 340A.

(14) “Critical Habitat” means those areas that support rare, threatened, or endangered species or serve as sensitive spawning and rearing areas for aquatic life as designated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service or National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Fisheries pursuant to the Endangered Species Act (16 USC 1531).

(15) “Daily Mean” for dissolved oxygen means the numeric average of an adequate number of data to describe the variation in dissolved oxygen concentration throughout a day, including daily maximums and minimums. For the purpose of calculating the mean, concentrations in excess of 100 percent of saturation are valued at the saturation concentration.

(16) “Department” or “DEQ” means the Oregon State Department of Environmental Quality.

(17) “Designated Beneficial Use” means the purpose or benefit to be derived from a water body as designated by the Water Resources Department or the Water Resources Commission.

(18) “DO” means dissolved oxygen.

(19) “Ecological Integrity” means the summation of chemical, physical, and biological integrity capable of supporting and maintaining a balanced, integrated, adaptive community of organisms having a species composition, diversity, and functional organization comparable to that of the natural habitat of the region.

(20) “Epilimnion” means the seasonally stratified layer of a lake or reservoir above the metalimnion; the surface layer.

(21) “Erosion Control Plan” means a plan containing a list of best management practices to be applied during construction to control and limit soil erosion.

(22) “Estuarine Waters” means all mixed fresh and oceanic waters in estuaries or bays from the point of oceanic water intrusion inland to a line connecting the outermost points of the headlands or protective jetties.

(23) “High Quality Waters” means those waters that meet or exceed levels that are necessary to support the propagation of fish, shellfish, and wildlife; recreation in and on the water; and other designated beneficial uses.

(24) “Hypolimnion” means the seasonally stratified layer of a lake or reservoir below the metalimnion; the bottom layer.

(25) “Industrial Waste” means any liquid, gaseous, radioactive, or solid waste substance or a combination thereof resulting from any process of industry, manufacturing, trade, or business or from the development or recovery of any natural resources.

(26) “In Lieu Fee” means a fee collected by a jurisdiction in lieu of requiring construction of onsite stormwater quality control facilities.

(27) “Intergravel Dissolved Oxygen” (IGDO) means the concentration of oxygen measured in the water within the stream bed gravels. Measurements should be taken within a limited time period before emergence of fry.

(28) “Jurisdiction” means any city or county agency in the Tualatin River and Oswego Lake subbasin that regulates land development activities within its boundaries by approving plats or site plans or issuing permits for land development.

(29) “Land Development” means any human-induced change to improved or unimproved real estate, including but not limited to construction, installation or expansion of a building or other structure; land division; drilling; and site alteration such as land surface mining, dredging, grading, construction of earthen berms, paving, improvements for use as parking or storage, excavation, or clearing.

(30) “Load Allocation (LA)” means the portion of a receiving water’s loading capacity that is attributed either to one of its existing or future nonpoint sources of pollution or to natural background sources. Load allocations are best estimates of the loading that may range from reasonably accurate estimates to gross allotments, depending on the availability of data and appropriate techniques for predicting loading. Whenever possible, natural and nonpoint source loads should be distinguished.

(31) “Loading Capacity (LC)” means the greatest amount of loading that a water body can receive without violating water quality standards.

(32) “Low Flow Period” means the flows in a stream resulting primarily from groundwater discharge or base flows augmented from lakes and storage projects during the driest period of the year. The dry weather period varies across the state according to climate and topography. Wherever the low flow period is indicated in Water Quality Management Plans, this period has been approximated by the inclusive months. Where applicable in a waste discharge permit, the low flow period may be further defined.

(33) “Managed Lakes” refers to lakes in which hydrology is managed by controlling the rate or timing of inflow or outflow,

(34) “Marine Waters” means all oceanic, offshore waters outside of estuaries or bays and within the territorial limits of the State of Oregon.

(35) “mg/l” or “mg/L” means milligrams per liter.

(36) “Metalimnion” means the seasonal, thermally stratified layer of a lake or reservoir that is characterized by a rapid change in temperature with depth and that effectively isolates the waters of the epilimnion from those of the hypolimnion during the period of stratification; the middle layer.

(37) “Migration Corridors” mean those waters that are predominantly used for salmon and steelhead migration during the summer and have little or no anadromous salmonid rearing in the months of July and August. These uses are designated on the following subbasin maps set out at OAR 340-041-0101 to 340-041-0340: Tables 101B, and 121B, and Figures 151A, 170A, 300A and 340A.

(38) “Minimum” for dissolved oxygen means the minimum recorded concentration including seasonal and diurnal minimums.

(39) “Modified Aquatic Habitat” means waters in which cool or cold-water aquatic communities are absent, limited or substantially degraded due to modifications of the physical habitat, hydrology or water quality. The physical, hydrologic or chemical modifications preclude or limit the attainment of cool or cold water habitat or the species composition that would be expected based on a natural reference stream, and cannot feasibly or reasonably be reversed or abated.

(40) “Monthly (30-day) Mean Minimum” for dissolved oxygen means the minimum of the 30 consecutive-day floating averages of the calculated daily mean dissolved oxygen concentration.

(41) “Natural Conditions” means conditions or circumstances affecting the physical, chemical, or biological integrity of a water of the state that are not influenced by past or present anthropogenic activities. Disturbances from wildfire, floods, earthquakes, volcanic or geothermal activity, wind, insect infestation, and diseased vegetation are considered natural conditions.

(42) “Natural Thermal Potential” means the determination of the thermal profile of a water body using best available methods of analysis and the best available information on the site-potential riparian vegetation, stream geomorphology, stream flows, and other measures to reflect natural conditions.

(43) “Nonpoint Sources” means any source of water pollution other than a point source. Generally, a nonpoint source is a diffuse or unconfined source of pollution where wastes can either enter into or be conveyed by the movement of water to waters of the state.

(44) “Ocean Waters” means all oceanic, offshore waters outside of estuaries or bays and within the territorial limits of Oregon.

(45) “Outstanding Resource Waters” means those waters designated by the commission where existing high quality waters constitute an outstanding state or national resource based on their extraordinary water quality or ecological values or where special water quality protection is needed to maintain critical habitat areas.

(46) “Pollution” means such contamination or other alteration of the physical, chemical, or biological properties of any waters of the state, including change in temperature, taste, color, turbidity, silt, or odor of the waters, or such discharge of any liquid, gaseous, solid, radioactive, or other substance into any water of the state that either by itself or in connection with any other substance present can reasonably be expected to create a public nuisance or render such waters harmful, detrimental, or injurious to public health, safety, or welfare; to domestic, commercial, industrial, agricultural, recreational, or other legitimate beneficial uses; or to livestock, wildlife, fish, other aquatic life or the habitat thereof.

(47) “Point Source” means a discernable, confined, and discrete conveyance, including but not limited to a pipe, ditch, channel, tunnel, conduit, well, discrete fissure, container, rolling stock, concentrated animal feeding operation, vessel or other floating craft, or leachate collection system from which pollutants are or may be discharged. Point source does not include agricultural storm water discharges and return flows from irrigated agriculture.

(48) “Public Water” means the same as “waters of the state”.

(49) “Public Works Project” means any land development conducted or financed by a local, state, or federal governmental body.

(50) “Reserve Capacity” means that portion of a receiving stream’s loading capacity that has not been allocated to point sources or to nonpoint sources and natural background as waste load allocations or load allocations, respectively. The reserve capacity includes that loading capacity that has been set aside for a safety margin and is otherwise unallocated.

(51) “Resident Biological Community” means aquatic life expected to exist in a particular habitat when water quality standards for a specific ecoregion, basin, or water body are met. This must be established by accepted biomonitoring techniques.

(52) “Salmon” means chinook, chum, coho, sockeye, and pink salmon.

(53) “Salmon and Steelhead Spawning Use” means waters that are or could be used for salmon and steelhead spawning, egg incubation, and fry emergence. These uses are designated on the following subbasin maps set out at OAR 340-041-0101 to 340-041-0340: Tables 101B, and 121B, and Figures 130B, 151B, 160B, 170B, 220B, 230B, 271B, 286B, 300B, 310B, 320B, and 340B.

(54) “Salmon and Trout Rearing and Migration Use” means thermally suitable rearing habitat for salmon, steelhead, rainbow trout, and cutthroat trout as designated on subbasin maps set out at OAR 340-041-0101 to 340-041-0340: Figures 130A, 151A, 160A, 170A, 220A, 230A, 271A, 286A, 300A, 310A, 320A, and 340A.

(55) “Salmonid or Salmonids” means native salmon, trout, mountain whitefish, and char (including bull trout). For purposes of Oregon water quality standards, salmonid does not include brook or brown trout since they are introduced species.

(56) “Secondary Treatment” means the following depending on the context:

(a) For “sewage wastes,” secondary treatment means the minimum level of treatment mandated by EPA regulations pursuant to Public Law 92-500.

(b) For “industrial and other waste sources,” secondary treatment means control equivalent to best practicable treatment (BPT).

(57) “Seven-Day Average Maximum Temperature” means a calculation of the average of the daily maximum temperatures from seven consecutive days made on a rolling basis.

(58) “Sewage” means the water-carried human or animal waste from residences, buildings, industrial establishments, or other places together with such groundwater infiltration and surface water as may be present. The admixture with sewage of industrial wastes or wastes, as defined in this rule, may also be considered “sewage” within the meaning of this division.

(59) “Short-Term Disturbance” means a temporary disturbance of six months or less when water quality standards may be violated briefly but not of sufficient duration to cause acute or chronic effects on beneficial uses.

(60) “Spatial Median” means the value that falls in the middle of a data set of multiple intergravel dissolved oxygen (IGDO) measurements taken within a spawning area. Half the samples should be greater than and half the samples should be less than the spatial median.

(61) “SS” means suspended solids.

(62) “Stormwater Quality Control Facility” means any structure or drainage way that is designed, constructed, and maintained to collect and filter, retain, or detain surface water runoff during and after a storm event for the purpose of water quality improvement. It may also include but is not be limited to existing features such as wetlands, water quality swales, and ponds that are maintained as stormwater quality control facilities.

(63) “Subbasin” means a fourth-field hydrologic unit as identified by the U.S. Geological Survey.

(64) “Summer” means June 1 through September 30 of each calendar year.

(65) “Threatened or Endangered Species” means aquatic species listed as either threatened or endangered under the federal Endangered Species Act (16 USC 1531 et seq. and Title 50 of the Code of Federal Regulations).

(66) “Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL)” means the sum of the individual waste load allocations (WLAs) for point sources and load allocations (LAs) for nonpoint sources and background. If receiving water has only one point source discharger, the TMDL is the sum of that point source WLA plus the LAs for any nonpoint sources of pollution and natural background sources, tributaries, or adjacent segments. TMDLs can be expressed in terms of either mass per time, toxicity, or other appropriate measure. If Best Management Practices (BMPs) or other nonpoint source pollution controls make more stringent load allocations practicable, then wasteload allocations can be made less stringent. Thus, the TMDL process provides for nonpoint source control tradeoffs.

(67) “Toxic Substance” means those pollutants or combinations of pollutants, including disease-causing agents, that after introduction to waters of the state and upon exposure, ingestion, inhalation, or assimilation either directly from the environment or indirectly by ingestion through food chains will cause death, disease, behavioral abnormalities, cancer, genetic mutations, physiological malfunctions (including malfunctions in reproduction), or physical deformations in any organism or its offspring.

(68) “Wasteload Allocation (WLA)” means the portion of receiving water’s loading capacity that is allocated to one of its existing or future point sources of pollution. WLAs constitute a type of water quality-based effluent limitation.

(69) “Warm-Water Aquatic Life” means the aquatic communities that are adapted to warm-water conditions and do not contain either cold- or cool-water species.

(70) “Wastes” means sewage, industrial wastes, and all other liquid, gaseous, solid, radioactive, or other substances that may cause or tend to cause pollution of any water of the state.

(71) “Water Quality Limited” means one of the following:

(a) A receiving stream that does not meet narrative or numeric water quality criteria during the entire year or defined season even after the implementation of standard technology;

(b) A receiving stream that achieves and is expected to continue to achieve narrative or numeric water quality criteria but uses higher than standard technology to protect beneficial uses;

(c) A receiving stream for which there is insufficient information to determine whether water quality criteria are being met with higher-than-standard treatment technology or a receiving stream that would not be expected to meet water quality criteria during the entire year or defined season without higher than standard technology.

(72) “Water Quality Swale” means a natural depression or wide, shallow ditch that is used to temporarily store, route, or filter runoff for the purpose of improving water quality.

(73) “Waters of the State” means lakes, bays, ponds, impounding reservoirs, springs, wells, rivers, streams, creeks, estuaries, marshes, inlets, canals, the Pacific Ocean within the territorial limits of the State of Oregon, and all other bodies of surface or underground waters, natural or artificial, inland or coastal, fresh or salt, public or private (except those private waters that do not combine or effect a junction with natural surface or underground waters) that are located wholly or partially within or bordering the state or within its jurisdiction.

(74) “Weekly (seven-day) Mean Minimum” for dissolved oxygen means the minimum of the seven consecutive-day floating average of the calculated daily mean dissolved oxygen concentration.

(75) “Weekly (seven-day) Minimum Mean” for dissolved oxygen means the minimum of the seven consecutive-day floating average of the daily minimum concentration. For purposes of application of the criteria, this value will be used as the reference for diurnal minimums.

(76) “Without Detrimental Changes in the Resident Biological Community” means no loss of ecological integrity when compared to natural conditions at an appropriate reference site or region.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 468.020, 468B.010, 468B.015, 468B.035, 468B.048
Stats. Implemented: ORS 468B.035, 468B.048
Hist.: DEQ 17-2003, f. & cert. ef. 12-9-03; DEQ 3-2004, f. & cert. ef. 5-28-04; DEQ 2-2007, f. & cert. ef. 3-15-07; DEQ 3-2012, f. & cert. ef. 5-21-12

340-041-0310

Beneficial Uses to Be Protected in the Umatilla Basin

(1) Water quality in the Umatilla Basin (see Figure 1) must be managed to protect the designated beneficial uses shown in Table 310A (April 2012).

(2) Designated fish uses to be protected in the Umatilla Basin are shown in Figures 310A and 310B (November 2003).

Stat. Auth.: ORS 468.020, 468B.030, 468B.035 & 468B.048
Stats. Implemented: ORS 468B.030, 468B.035 & 468B.048
Hist.: DEQ 17-2003, f. & cert. ef. 12-9-03; DEQ 3-2012, f. & cert. ef. 5-21-12

340-041-0315

Water Quality Standards and Policies for this Basin

(1) pH (hydrogen ion concentration). pH values may not fall outside the following range: all Basin streams (other than main stem Columbia River and the West Division Main Canal): 6.5-9.0. When greater than 25 percent of ambient measurements taken between June and September are greater than pH 8.7, and as resources are available according to priorities set by the Department, the Department will determine whether the values higher than 8.7 are anthropogenic or natural in origin.

(2) The following criteria apply to the West Division Main Canal and supersede the water quality standards in OAR 340-041-0011 through 340-041-0036:

(a) Canal waters may not exceed the numeric criteria shown in Table 315. These criteria apply from the uppermost irrigation withdrawal to the confluence with the Columbia River;

(b) Toxic substances shall not be present in canal waters in amounts that are likely to singularly or in combination harm the designated beneficial uses of the canal or downstream waters. The presence of substances at naturally occurring levels shall not be considered harmful to the designated uses;

(c) Sediment load and particulate size shall not exceed levels that interfere with irrigation or the other designated beneficial uses of the canal;

(d) The dissolved oxygen criteria contained in OAR 340-041-0016(4) apply to “overflow channels” segment of the canal to protect the “modified aquatic habitat” use.

(e) pH values in the “constructed channel” segment of the canal may not fall outside the range of 4.5 to 9.0.

(f) pH values in the “overflow channels” segment of the canal may not fall outside the range of 6.5 to 9.0 in order to protect the “modified aquatic habitat” use.

(3) Minimum Design Criteria for Treatment and control of Sewage Wastes in this Basin:

(a) During periods of low stream flows (approximately April 1 to October 31): Treatment resulting in monthly average effluent concentrations not to exceed 20 mg/l of BOD and 20 mg/l of SS or equivalent control;

(b) During the period of high stream flows (approximately November 1 to April 30): A minimum of secondary treatment or equivalent control and unless otherwise specifically authorized by the Department, operation of all waste treatment and control facilities at maximum practicable efficiency and effectiveness so as to minimize waste discharges to public waters.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 468.020, 468B.030, 468B.035 & 468B.048
Stats. Implemented: ORS 468B.030, 468B.035 & 468B.048
Hist.: DEQ 17-2003, f. & cert. ef. 12-9-03; DEQ 2-2007, f. & cert. ef. 3-15-07; DEQ 3-2012, f. & cert. ef. 5-21-12

Notes
1.) This online version of the OREGON BULLETIN is provided for convenience of reference and enhanced access. The official, record copy of this publication is contained in the original Administrative Orders and Rulemaking Notices filed with the Secretary of State, Archives Division. Discrepancies, if any, are satisfied in favor of the original versions. Use the OAR Revision Cumulative Index found in the Oregon Bulletin to access a numerical list of rulemaking actions after November 15, 2011.

2.) Copyright 2012 Oregon Secretary of State: Terms and Conditions of Use

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