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The Oregon Administrative Rules contain OARs filed through August 15, 2014
 
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OREGON YOUTH AUTHORITY

 

DIVISION 550

YOUTH OFFENDER TREATMENT FOSTER CARE

 

416-550-0000

Purpose

Treatment foster care is a program for offenders and their families whose out-of-home treatment needs can be met through services delivered by treatment foster parents, and/or professional staff trained, supervised and supported by an agency. These rules set standards for the operation of a treatment foster care program. All agencies under contract with the OYA to provide this service, or proposing to provide this service, must adhere to these rules.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 420A.025
Stats. Implemented: ORS 420.810, 420.815, 420.821, 420.825, 420.835, 420.840, 420.888, 420.890 & 420.892
Hist.: OYA 2-1995, f. 12-19-95, cert. ef. 1-2-96; OYA 1-2000, f. & cert. ef. 4-4-00; OYA 7-2005, f. & cert. ef. 3-25-05

416-550-0010

Definitions

(1) Aftercare: The plan which outlines the services and resources that will be needed when the offender leaves the treatment foster care program.

(2) Agency: A public or private organization which contracts with the OYA to provide treatment foster care services.

(3) Agency staff: A person employed by the treatment foster care program that gives support to the treatment foster parent or the offender/family (for example, the Treatment Specialist or Clinical Supervisor).

(4) Case Plan: A formal plan with prescribed interventions and documentation requirements and which is a tool to assist staff in managing cases, setting goals and reviewing youths' interventions and progress. A case plan constitutes and fulfills the requirements of the Reformation Plan as defined in ORS 420A.005, 420A.125 and 420A.010 and is created and maintained in the statewide Juvenile Justice Information System, JJIS.

(5) Clinical Supervisor: A person employed by the treatment foster care program who provides support, supervision and consultation to the Treatment Specialist and/or the treatment foster parent.

(6) Crisis-on-call: 24-hour-a-day, seven-day-a-week availability, either by phone or in person, for the provision of emergency and/or back-up services.

(7) Matching: The process of placing an offender in a home that can specifically meet the individual reformation needs of that particular offender. These needs include, but are not limited to, a treatment foster parent's ability to speak the language of the offender, the home's proximity to the offender's family, and same race, ethnicity and culture.

(8) Respite care: A temporary arrangement of 12 hours or more, to allow the treatment foster parent(s) time away from the offender.

(9) Respite provider: An individual approved by the OYA who temporarily assists with supervision of offenders when the treatment foster parent is not available.

(10) Treatment: The coordinated provision of services designed to produce a planned outcome in a person's behavior, attitude or general condition. Treatment is based on a thorough assessment of factors contributing to the attitude, condition or behavior.

(11) Treatment foster care: The model of care in which an offender receives treatment in the foster home from the treatment foster parent who is under the supervision and support of a professional therapist of an identified program. A distinct, powerful, and unique model of care that provides offenders with a combination of the best elements of traditional foster care and residential treatment. In treatment foster care, the positive aspects of the nurturing and therapeutic family environment are combined with active and structured treatment. Treatment foster care programs provide, in a clinically effective and cost effective way, individualized and intensive treatment for offenders who would otherwise be placed in institutional settings.

(12) Treatment foster care program: A separately identifiable unit of a larger agency or an independent agency itself that has been certified by the OYA to provide treatment foster care services.

(13) Treatment foster parents: In-home treatment providers of a treatment foster care program certified by the OYA who implement reformation strategies identified in the case plan in addition to carrying out their regular foster care responsibilities.

(14) Treatment Plan: An individualized plan for each offender developed by a treatment team that is goal-oriented and of a particular duration. Each plan will identify desired behavior changes and a time estimate for achieving the plan goals. The treatment plan is congruent with the offender's case plan.

(15) Treatment Specialist: A person employed by the treatment foster care program who provides training, supervision, support and consultation to the treatment foster parent.

(16) Treatment team: Those people concerned with the care and treatment of the offender. The team may be comprised of, but is not limited to, the treatment foster parent(s) and the Treatment Specialist.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 420A.025
Stats. Implemented: ORS 420.810, 420.815, 420.821, 420.825, 420.835, 420.840, 420.888, 420.890 & 420.892
Hist.: OYA 2-1995, f. 12-19-95, cert. ef. 1-2-96; OYA 1-2000, f. & cert. ef. 4-4-00; OYA 7-2005, f. & cert. ef. 3-25-05

416-550-0020

Overview

Offenders appropriate for treatment foster care have serious emotional and/or behavioral disorders. The level of supervisory treatment and family intervention needs of these offenders is comparable to those served in residential treatment facilities. Treatment foster care consists of:

(1) A treatment foster care agency/foster care treatment program with staff who give support to the treatment foster parent and the offender/family; and

(2) Treatment foster parents who implement treatment strategies identified in the treatment plan in addition to carrying out their regular foster care responsibilities.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 420A.025
Stats. Implemented: ORS 420.810, 420.815, 420.821, 420.825, 420.835, 420.840, 420.888, 420.890 & 420.892
Hist.: OYA 2-1995, f. 12-19-95, cert. ef. 1-2-96; OYA 1-2000; OYA 7-2005, f. & cert. ef. 3-25-05

416-550-0030

Treatment Foster Care Program

A treatment foster care program must be a separately identifiable unit of a larger agency or be an independent agency itself:

(1) Eligibility:

(a) The program must meet standards as defined in OAR chapter 416, Division 530 to be eligible to be a treatment foster care program;

(b) Selection of a treatment foster care program will be made by the Oregon Youth Authority based on current need and ability to fund the program.

(2) Administration: The treatment foster care program must designate an individual who is responsible for the provision and oversight of all essential tasks and services described in these rules.

(3) Staff:

(a) Clinical Supervisor's responsibilities/qualifications include:

(A) Clinical Supervision. The Clinical Supervisor provides regular support, consultation and guidance to the Treatment Specialist. The Clinical Supervisor to Treatment Specialist ratio must not exceed one to five;

(B) Treatment Planning. The Clinical Supervisor takes ultimate clinical responsibility for the development of a comprehensive treatment plan based on a thorough assessment for each offender admitted to the program. This plan must be congruent with and supportive of the case plan developed by the Oregon Youth Authority. She or he supervises ongoing treatment planning and implementation for each offender, evaluating all progress reports and treatment plan updates;

(C) Treatment Team. The Clinical Supervisor oversees and supports the Treatment Specialist as leader of the treatment team and shares ultimate responsibility for team plans and decisions;

(D) Crisis On-Call. The treatment foster care program provides coordination and back-up to assure that 24-hour on-call crisis intervention services are available and delivered as needed to treatment foster parents, offenders, and families;

(E) Qualifications. The Clinical Supervisor must have a graduate degree in a human service field plus a minimum of two years' experience in the placement/treatment of offenders and families. The Clinical Supervisor must be familiar with clinical research and practice. If the education and experience of the Clinical Supervisor are not recognized, additional clinical consultation will be provided. Clinical consultants must be licensed or otherwise recognized as qualified by the state of Oregon in the human service field.

(b) Treatment Specialist's responsibilities/qualifications include:

(A) Treatment Team. The Treatment Specialist takes primary day-to-day responsibility for leadership, training, support and consultation to the treatment team. The Treatment Specialist organizes and manages all team meetings. If the Treatment Specialist is prevented from participation in a team meeting by a crisis or personal leave reasons, the Clinical Supervisor takes over that responsibility. As team leader, the Treatment Specialist manages team decision-making regarding the care and treatment of the offender and services to the offender's family;

(B) Treatment Planning. Under the supervision of the Clinical Supervisor, the Treatment Specialist takes primary responsibility for the preparation of each offender's written comprehensive treatment plan and of quarterly written updates of the plan. The Treatment Specialist signs off on treatment plans and updates. The Treatment Specialist seeks to inform and involve other team members in this process including treatment foster parents, the offender and the offender's family;

(C) Support/Consultation to Treatment Foster Parents. The Treatment Specialist will provide regular support and technical assistance to treatment foster parents in their implementation of the treatment plan and with regard to other responsibilities they undertake. The Treatment Specialist will provide at least weekly contact in person with the treatment foster parent of each offender on his/her caseload. The Treatment Specialist will visit the treatment home to meet with at least one treatment foster parent no less than once monthly;

(D) Caseload. The maximum number of offenders that may be assigned to a single individual is 10;

(E) Contact with Offenders. The Treatment Specialist or other treatment foster care program staff will regularly spend time, outside the presence of the treatment foster parent, with offenders in care to allow them the opportunity to communicate special concerns, to make a direct assessment of their progress, and to monitor for potential problems in the current placement. Such face-to-face contact must occur at least twice monthly;

(F) Support/Consultation to the Families of Offenders. The Treatment Specialist will arrange for and encourage regular contact and visitation between offenders and their parents and other family members and provide for or coordinate treatment or training to the family as specified in the treatment plan. The Treatment Specialist will seek to involve the offender's parents, when appropriate, in treatment team meetings, plans and decisions and to keep them informed of the offender's progress in the program;

(G) Community Liaison and Advocacy. The Treatment Specialist will determine which community resources are required and how they may be used to meet the objectives of the offender's treatment plan. The Treatment Specialist will advocate for and coordinate the provision of such services and will provide technical assistance to community service providers as needed to maximize the benefit of these services to the offender;

(H) Crisis On-Call. The Treatment Specialist or other professional staff, as designated by the treatment foster care program, will be on-call to treatment foster parents, offenders and their families on an around-the-clock, seven-day-a-week basis;

(I) Qualifications. The Treatment Specialist will have at a minimum a B.A. or B.S. degree in a human service field plus two years' direct experience working with offenders and families, or an A.A. degree with three years' experience working with offenders and families.

(4) Staff Training and Support: Liability Insurance. Professional staff will be covered by liability insurance.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 420A.025
Stats. Implemented: ORS 420.810, 420.815, 420.821, 420.825, 420.835, 420.840, 420.888, 420.890 & 420.892
Hist.: OYA 2-1995, f. 12-19-95, cert. ef. 1-2-96; OYA 1-2000, f. & cert. ef. 4-4-00; OYA 7-2005, f. & cert. ef. 3-25-05

416-550-0040

Treatment Foster Parents

Treatment foster parents serve as in-home treatment agents implementing strategies specified in an offender's treatment plan including support of the offender's family relationships:

(1) Qualifications and Selection:

(a) Treatment foster parent(s) must be certified as an OYA foster home as defined in OAR chapter 416, divisions 530 and 800; and assume the responsibilities outlined in OAR chapter 416, division 530 in addition to the those in this rule.

(b) Treatment foster parent(s) must be employees of, or have a contract with, a treatment foster care program;

(c) Prospective applicants, foster parent(s) and members of the household 18 years of age and older will consent to a criminal record check by the agency. The OYA may require a criminal record check for any employee, volunteer, or other adult having regular contact with offenders placed in the foster home. The OYA may require a criminal history on members of the household under 18 years if there is reason to believe that member may pose a risk to offenders placed in the home. The OYA may require that the applicant(s)/foster parent(s)/member(s) of the household provide fingerprints and processing fees for the purpose of a criminal record check following procedures outlined in OAR chapter 416, division 800.

(d) Language. At least one treatment foster parent must demonstrate effective communication in a language of the offender in the treatment foster parent's care, and in a language of the program/treatment team with which they work;

(e) Age. Treatment foster parents must be at least 21 years of age;

(f) Health. The physical health of treatment foster parents must be equal to the stress inherent in the care of a special needs offender as evidenced by a physician's statement to that effect;

(g) Transportation. Treatment foster parents must have access to reliable transportation. If using a car, they must have a valid Oregon driver's license and document ownership of liability insurance as required by law;

(h) Physical Discipline. Treatment foster parents must agree not to use physical discipline with offenders placed in their care and to adhere to the agency's policies regarding the use of discipline generally.

(2) Responsibilities:

(a) List of Responsibilities. Prospective treatment foster parents must be provided with a written list of duties clearly detailing their responsibilities as treatment foster parents prior to their approval by the program;

(b) Treatment Responsibilities:

(A) Treatment Planning. The treatment foster parent will assist the Treatment Specialist and other team members in the development of treatment plans for the offender or offenders in their care. These treatment plans must be congruent with the case plan developed by the OYA;

(B) Treatment Implementation. The treatment foster parent will assume primary responsibility for implementing the in-home treatment strategies specified in the offender's initial and comprehensive treatment plans and revisions thereof;

(C) Treatment Team Meetings. The treatment foster care parent will work cooperatively with other team members under the leadership of the Treatment Specialist and attend team meetings, training sessions and other gatherings required by the program or by the offender's treatment plan;

(D) Record Keeping. The treatment foster care parent will systematically record information and document activities as required by the agency and the standards under which it operates.

(E) Contact with Offender's Family. The treatment foster care parent will assist the offender in maintaining contact with his/her family and work actively to support and enhance these relationships, unless contraindicated in the offender's treatment plan;

(F) Community Relations. The treatment foster care parent will develop and maintain positive working relationships with service providers in the community such as schools, departments of recreation, social service agencies, and mental health programs and professionals;

(G) Advocacy. The treatment foster care parent, in concert with the treatment foster care program Treatment Specialist and other staff, will advocate on behalf of the offender to achieve the goals identified in the offender's treatment plan, to obtain educational, vocational, medical and other services, and to assure full access to and provision of public services to which the offender is legally entitled.

(H) Notice of Request for Offender Move. Unless a move is required to protect the health or safety of the offender, other treatment foster care family members or other offenders in the treatment foster home, the treatment foster parent will provide at least 14 days' notice to program staff if requesting an offender's removal from the home so as to allow a planned and minimally disruptive transition. The OYA will be notified of such change.

(3) Treatment Foster Parent Training:

(a) Training of treatment foster parents will be a systematic, planned, and documented process which includes competency-based skill training and is not limited to the provision of information through didactic instruction;

(b) Pre-service Training. Prior to the placement of offenders in their homes, all treatment foster parents must satisfactorily complete 20 pre-service hours of primarily skill-based training consistent with the agency's treatment methodology and the service needs of the offender;

(c) Annual Inservice Training. A written, agency-approved, professional development plan will be on record in each agency which describes the content and objectives of inservice training for all agency treatment foster parents. All treatment foster parents must satisfactorily complete a minimum of 40 hours of inservice training annually based on the training needs identified in the agency's professional development plan and the specific services treatment foster parents are required to provide. Inservice training should emphasize skill development, as well as knowledge acquisition, and may include a variety of formats and procedures including in-home training provided by agency casework staff;

(d) Evaluation of Training. All treatment foster parents must be provided an opportunity to evaluate mandated training.

(4) Treatment Foster Parent Support:

(a) Information Disclosure. All information the treatment foster care program receives concerning an offender to be placed with a treatment foster parent will be shared with and explained to the prospective treatment foster parent prior to placement. Agency/treatment foster care program staff will discuss with the prospective treatment foster parents the offender's strengths and assets, potential problems and needs, and initial intervention strategies for addressing these areas. As full treatment team members, treatment foster parents have access to full disclosure of information concerning the offender. With this access goes the responsibility to maintain agency standards of confidentiality;

(b) Respite Care. Treatment foster parents will have access to both planned and crisis respite care by providers who have been selected and trained by the program in providing respite care. Respite providers must be informed of the offender's treatment plan and supervised in their implementation of the in-home strategies it specifies;

(c) Counseling. Treatment foster parents and other family members in the home will have assistance in finding counseling when requested for personal issues/problems caused or exacerbated by their work as treatment foster parents. Such issues may include, for example, marital stress, or abuse of their own children by an offender placed in their care by the treatment foster care program;

(d) Support Network. The treatment foster care program will facilitate the creation of formal or informal support networks for its treatment foster parents as, for example, through the coordination of parent support groups or treatment foster parent "buddy" systems;

(e) Financial Support. Agency financial support to treatment foster parents must cover the cost of care as well as payment for the difficulty of care associated with their treatment responsibilities and the special needs of the offender they serve;

(f) Damages and Liability. The agency must have a written plan concerning compensation for damages done to a treatment foster parent's property by an offender placed in their care. This plan must be given and explained to prospective treatment foster parents as part of their pre-service orientation. The agency must provide or assist treatment foster parents in obtaining liability coverage. Treatment foster parents are required to document that they carry home/apartment, automobile (if they have a motor vehicle), property and liability insurance themselves in addition to any liability and damage coverage provided by or through their treatment foster care program.

(5) Treatment Home Capacity. The number of treatment foster care offenders placed in one treatment foster home will not exceed two, but preferably will be one. The total number of youth living in a treatment foster home, including the foster parents' own children, will not exceed five. Treatment foster parents have the right to refuse placement of any offender they feel is inappropriate for the home, endangers the safety of offenders currently in the home, or treatment foster care family members. On a case-by-case basis, a treatment foster care offender may be eligible to remain in the treatment foster care home as an on-going foster care placement upon completion of the treatment foster care program if there is special justification and it is in the best interests of the offender. At no time will there be more than one on-going foster care placement in a treatment foster care home with two treatment foster care offenders.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 420A.025
Stats. Implemented: ORS 420.810, 420.815, 420.821, 420.825, 420.835, 420.840, 420.888, 420.890 & 420.892
Hist.: OYA 2-1995, f. 12-19-95, cert. ef. 1-2-96; OYA 1-2000, f. & cert. ef. 4-4-00; OYA 7-2002, f. & cert. ef. 1-18-02; OYA 7-2005, f. & cert. ef. 3-25-05

416-550-0050

Offenders and Their Families

Placement and Support:

(1) Matching. Placement of an offender will be made only after careful consideration of how well the prospective treatment foster parent will meet the offender's needs and preferences and will represent a reasonable "match" for the offender.

(2) Assessment. To achieve sound placement decisions and planning for relevant treatment services to offenders, agency/treatment foster care program staff must receive and review the following case material prior to an offender's admission: current case plan(s), legal documents and relevant police records, etc., social history information, previous and current (within a year of referral date) psychological assessments if available, school information, medical information, previous placement history and outcomes, potential problems and information on the offender's/offender's skills, interests, talents and other assets.

(3) Records. For offenders admitted to treatment foster care, an individual case record will be kept which includes the above information as well as the following:

(a) Personal identifying information;

(b) A pre-admission psychological evaluation;

(c) An offender's social and family history;

(d) Educational history including school reports and available standardized test results;

(e) Medical information including sight, hearing and dental exam reports, current medications and allergies, offender's physical description, immunization records, medical history and Medicaid/SSI number, if applicable;

(f) Authorizations for routine and emergency medical care, dental care and other medical procedures;

(g) Other required authorizations such as authorization for out-of-state travel, participation in special activities, publicity releases, etc.;

(h) Correspondence with/from agencies involved with the offender;

(i) The initial treatment plan;

(j) The comprehensive treatment plan;

(k) Progress reports;

(l) Case notes including contacts with the offender's family/extended family;

(m) Incident logs or records on serious behavior problems, police and relevant juvenile court records and reports when possible, illnesses or injuries.

(4) Offender's Access to Treatment Foster Care Program Staff. Offenders will have access to designated treatment foster care program staff at all times to discuss concerns including any problems they are experiencing with their treatment foster family. Treatment foster care program staff will provide regular one-to-one contact with each offender on at least a twice monthly basis.

(5) Offender-Family Contact/Relationships. Unless specifically proscribed by court or custodial agency decision, offenders will have access to regular contact with their families as described in the treatment plan.

(6) Rights of Offenders in Treatment Foster Care. Offenders in treatment foster care have the same basic rights as all offenders including the right to privacy, to humane treatment, to adequate shelter, clothing, nutrition, essential personal care items and allowances, and access to religious worship services of their choice. The treatment foster care program will explain to each offender what his/her rights are in a manner consistent with the offender's level of understanding, and make this information available to the offender in writing.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 420A.025
Stats. Implemented: ORS 420.810, 420.815, 420.821, 420.825, 420.835, 420.840, 420.888, 420.890 & 420.892
Hist.: OYA 2-1995, f. 12-19-95, cert. ef. 1-2-96; OYA 7-2005, f. & cert. ef. 3-25-05

416-550-0060

Treatment

(1) Initial Treatment Plan. An initial written treatment plan will be completed by the time of the offender's admission to the program. The plan will describe specific tasks to be carried out by the treatment team during the first 45 days of placement. It will describe strategies to ease the offender's adjustment to the treatment foster parent's home and to directly assess the offender's strengths, skills, interests and needs for treatment within the home. The initial plan should assess short-term goals for the first 45 days of placement, identify potential problems likely to be encountered with the offender and specify how the treatment team is to respond to them.

(2) Comprehensive Treatment Plan. A written comprehensive treatment plan will be completed for each offender admitted within 45 days of admission addressing the long-term goals of treatment including criteria for discharge, projected length of stay in the program, projected post-treatment foster care setting and aftercare services. It will be congruent with the case plan developed by the OYA. The plan will identify and build on the offender's strengths and assets as well as respond to presenting problems. The comprehensive treatment plan will include proactive short-term treatment goals which are measurable and time-limited along with specific strategies for promoting and regularly evaluating progress.

(3) Quarterly Progress Reports/Updates. Each offender's treatment plan will be specific, reviewed via quarterly reports and revised as necessary. Quarterly reports will document progress on specific short-term treatment goals, describe significant revisions in goals and strategies, and specify any new treatment goals and strategies initiated during the period covered. The quarterly progress report will summarize progress and note changes regarding long-term placement and treatment goals. The interagency team members will be invited to participate in the process to review and approve the quarterly report.

(4) Aftercare Plan. All planned discharges from treatment foster care will be reviewed and discussed by the treatment team, including the parole and probation worker and offender. An approved aftercare plan will be ready for implementation prior to the offender's planned departure from the program. The plan will specify the nature, frequency and duration of aftercare services and designate responsibility for service delivery. The treatment foster care program will provide these aftercare services directly or provide consultation to the person/agency assuming responsibility for working with the offender following discharge from the program. An aftercare plan also will be developed in a timely fashion for an offender whose discharge is not planned, with follow-up services provided or assisted as described here.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 420A.025
Stats. Implemented: ORS 420.810, 420.815, 420.821, 420.825, 420.835, 420.840, 420.888, 420.890 & 420.892
Hist.: OYA 2-1995, f. 12-19-95, cert. ef. 1-2-96; OYA 7-2005, f. & cert. ef. 3-25-05

416-550-0070

Program Statement

All treatment foster care programs will have a written program statement which describes its mission, organizational structure, services, policies, record-keeping and evaluation procedures. The program statement will describe:

(1) The treatment foster care program's treatment philosophy and the specific treatment modality(ies) it employs.

(2) The services the treatment foster care program provides.

(3) The offenders it is designed to serve with regard to age, gender, geographic service area and types of special needs the program is prepared to address. Offenders served must exhibit an identifiable special need.

(4) A staffing pattern which allows for the intensity of service required in treatment foster care and designates the individual responsible for program administration.

(5) How the services to be provided will reflect the cultural diversity of the community and be responsive to the needs of the community.

(6) A policy assuring that the treatment foster care program staff and treatment foster parents adhere to practices that respect and promote positive cultural or ethnic identity.

(7) A policy on discipline and physical.

(8) The plan for crisis intervention procedures.

(9) The protocol for investigating, responding to and reporting allegations of misconduct and/or abuse by treatment foster parents, treatment foster care program/agency staff, or an offender.

(10) The policy advising offenders and parents of their rights and the grievance procedures available to them.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 420A.025
Stats. Implemented: ORS 420.810, 420.815, 420.821, 420.825, 420.835, 420.840, 420.888, 420.890 & 420.892
Hist.: OYA 2-1995, f. 12-19-95, cert. ef. 1-2-96; OYA 7-2005, f. & cert. ef. 3-25-05

416-550-0080

Program Evaluation

(1) Documentation of Service Delivery. A treatment foster care program must clearly document delivery of all services described in its program statement as well as compliance with all minimum operating standards described above.

(2) Individual Treatment. Treatment foster care programs must document the implementation of all treatment plans and track progress on all long- and short-term treatment goals throughout each offender's tenure in care.

(3) Performance Evaluations. Treatment foster care programs will provide to treatment foster parents and professional staff written performance evaluations at least annually which include descriptive assessments of their performance of specific job responsibilities and goals for improved performance.

(4) Program Evaluation. Treatment foster care programs will have a program evaluation plan which describes information to be collected, summarized and analyzed at least annually. The plan will identify who will have access to the evaluation and how it will be used. The evaluation will include demographics on current offenders and their families, treatment families and professional staff; aggregated information describing in-program events such as placement disruptions; and a summary of information collected through follow-up tracking of offenders/offenders discharged from the program. The plan also will provide for periodic evaluations of program services by treatment foster parents, offenders and their families.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 420A.025
Stats. Implemented: ORS 420.810, 420.815, 420.821, 420.825, 420.835, 420.840, 420.888, 420.890 & 420.892
Hist.: OYA 2-1995, f. 12-19-95, cert. ef. 1-2-96; OYA 7-2005, f. & cert. ef. 3-25-05

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