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The Oregon Administrative Rules contain OARs filed through March 15, 2016
 
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OREGON DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

 

DIVISION 17

STRATEGIC INVESTMENTS

Guiding Principles

581-017-0005

Definitions

The following definitions apply to Oregon Administrative Rules in division 17, chapter 581 that implement strategic investments as part of the Oregon Early Reading Program, Guidance and Support for Post-Secondary Aspirations Program and Connecting to the World of Work Program:

(1) “40-40-20 goal” means the mission of Oregon’s education system as described in ORS 351.009.

(2) “Achievement gap” means the research-based gap in achievement that often exists between students who are economically disadvantaged, students learning English as a second language, African American, Hispanic or Native American and their peers.

(3) “Network” means the Network of Quality Teaching and Learning established by chapter 661, Oregon Law 2013 (Enrolled House Bill 3233).

(4) “Students who are economically disadvantaged” means students who are eligible for free or reduced price school meals.

Stat. Auth.: 2013 OL Ch. 660, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3232)
Stats. Implemented: 2013 OL Ch. 660, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3232)
Hist.: ODE 15-2013(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 8-15-13 thru 2-11-14; ODE 28-2013, f. & cert. ef. 12-18-13

581-017-0010

Equity Lens

(1) The Department of Education will apply the Equity Lens adopted by the Oregon Education Investment Board when administering the strategic investments including when determining resource allocation and making strategic investments.

(2) Specifically the Department shall consider the following:

(a) Who are the racial or ethnic and underserved groups affected? What is the potential impact of the resource allocation and strategic investment to these groups?

(b) Does the decision being made ignore or worsen existing disparities or produce other unintended consequences? What is the impact on eliminating the opportunity gap?

(c) How does the resource allocation or strategic investment advance the 40-40-20 goal?

(d) What are the barriers to more equitable outcomes? (e.g., mandated, political, emotional, financial, programmatic or managerial)

(e) How has the Department intentionally involved stakeholders who are also members of the communities affected by the resource allocation or strategic investment? How does the Department validate its assessment in paragraphs (a), (b) and (c) of this subsection?

(f) How will the Department modify or enhance the strategic investment to ensure each learner and communities’ individual and cultural needs are met?

(g) How is the Department collecting data on race, ethnicity, and native language relating to the strategic investments?

(h) What is the Department’s commitment to P-20 professional learning for equity? What resources is the Department allocating for training in cultural responsive instruction?

Stat. Auth.: 2013 OL Ch. 660, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3232)
Stats. Implemented: 2013 OL Ch. 660, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3232)
Hist.: ODE 15-2013(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 8-15-13 thru 2-11-14; ODE 28-2013, f. & cert. ef. 12-18-13

581-017-0020

Timelines and Performance Measures

Recipients of strategic investment grant funds shall meet timelines, performance measures and other requirements related to the accumulation and evaluation of data collected as required by the Oregon Education Investment Board and the Oregon Department of Education.

Stat. Auth.: 2013 OL Ch. 660, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3232)
Stats. Implemented: 2013 OL Ch. 660, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3232)
Hist.: ODE 15-2013(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 8-15-13 thru 2-11-14; ODE 28-2013, f. & cert. ef. 12-18-13

Expanded Reading Opportunities Grant

581-017-0100

Definitions

The following definitions apply to 581-017-0100 to 581-017-0115:

(1) “CAP (Comprehensive Achievement Plan)” means the plan for program improvement that all Focus and Priority Schools are required to develop and implement. It describes the school’s goals, tasks necessary to achieve those goals, and who is responsible for completion of each activity with anticipated due dates. The CAP is the vehicle for communication between the school and the Oregon Department of Education outlining the actions a school takes to implement interventions prescribed by the School Appraisal Team. The CAP, developed collaboratively by the district, school, and a team of educators and community members, commits the school to evidence-based interventions and fixed improvement goals.

(2) “Focus Schools” are those ranked in the fifth to the fifteenth percentile in overall rating and are:

(a) Within-School Gap: Title I schools with the largest within school achievement or graduation gaps, or

(b) With Low Achieving Subgroup: Title I schools with a subgroup or subgroups with low achievement in reading and mathematics, combined, or a subgroup with low graduation, or

(c) With Low Graduation Rate: Title I high schools with graduation rates under 60 percent that were not already identified as Priority Schools.

(3) “Focus and Priority Schools” means schools that were identified using the Department of Education’s overall rating system that analyzed 2011-2012 student achievement data and graduation rates.

(4) “Priority Schools” are those schools satisfying at least one of the following:

(a) School Improvement Grant (SIG): A Tier I or Tier II school receiving funding under the SIG program.

(b) Low Graduation Rate: A Title I-participating high school with a graduation rate of less than 60 percent.

(c) Low Achievement: Among the lowest five percent of Title I schools in the state based on the percent of students meeting state benchmarks in reading and mathematics combined for 2010-11 and 2011-12 that is not a high-progress school.

(5) “SIG Schools” means the schools that have received the 3-year School Improvement Program Grant and whom begun their work during the 2010–2011 (Cohort 1) or 2011–2012 (Cohort 2) school years.

Stat. Auth.: 2013 OL Ch. 660, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3232)
Stats. Implemented: 2013 OL Ch. 660, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3232)
Hist.: ODE 19-2013(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 8-15-13 thru 2-11-14; ODE 31-2013, f. & cert. ef. 12-18-13

581-017-0105

Establishment

(1) The Expanded Reading Opportunities Grant is established as part of the Early Reading Program Strategic Investment.

(2) The purposes of the program are to:

(a) Extend and expand reading opportunities in public schools; and

(b) Improve the reading proficiency of students by the time the students complete the third grade.

Stat. Auth.: 2013 OL Ch. 660, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3232)
Stats. Implemented: 2013 OL Ch. 660, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3232)
Hist.: ODE 19-2013(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 8-15-13 thru 2-11-14; ODE 31-2013, f. & cert. ef. 12-18-13

581-017-0110

Eligibility

The Department of Education shall allocate funds for the Expanded Reading Opportunities Grant to schools based on the following eligibility criteria:

(1) Schools must be a designated Focus or Priority School.

(2) Schools must serve students in at least one grade from kindergarten through grade 3.

(3) Schools must not have received a SIG grant.

(4) Schools must use the funds in alignment with their CAP.

(5) Schools must use the funds to extend or expand reading opportunities by:

(a) Providing adult support;

(b) Offering programs during non-school hours; or

(c) Increasing access to technology.

Stat. Auth.: 2013 OL Ch. 660, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3232)
Stats. Implemented: 2013 OL Ch. 660, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3232)
Hist.: ODE 19-2013(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 8-15-13 thru 2-11-14; ODE 31-2013, f. & cert. ef. 12-18-13

581-017-0115

Implementation Grant Funding

(1) The Department of Education may award at least $40,000 for the 2013-2014 school year to each eligible Focus and Priority School that applies and meets the criteria.

(2) For the 2014-2015 school year each eligible Focus and Priority School that applied may be awarded an equal amount based on the amount available.

(3) The Department may not award more than $4 million dollars in total per biennium for Expanded Reading Opportunities Grants.

(4) School that receive funds under the grant program may not use those funds for administrative costs.

Stat. Auth.: 2013 OL Ch. 660, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3232)
Stats. Implemented: 2013 OL Ch. 660, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3232)
Hist.: ODE 19-2013(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 8-15-13 thru 2-11-14; ODE 31-2013, f. & cert. ef. 12-18-13

Mentoring, Monitoring, Acceleration Grant

581-017-0200

Definitions

The following definitions apply to OAR 581-017-0200 to 581-017-0220:

(1) “Accelerated” means an underserved student who has achieved a “C” or higher will gain access to IB, AP or college credit courses. This can include but is not limited to transportation, consortium creation and teacher training.

(2) “At-risk” means a student who is less likely to succeed academically or more likely to drop out of school due to circumstances beyond their control.

(3) “Cultural Competence” means an individual or organization has proven their ability to understand the emotional, mental and physical challenges of non-majority individuals in a way that promotes a self-awareness and confidence that is reflected in the students’ academic achievement.

(4) “Non-profit organization” means:

(a) An organization established as a nonprofit organization under the laws of Oregon; and

(b) Qualifies as an exempt organization under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code as defined in ORS 314.011.

(5) “Wraparound” intervention strategy means an organization can demonstrate the ability to execute a highly structured and integrated effort to meet student needs in their home, school and community that is reflected in the students’ academic achievement.

(6)“Underserved” means a student who is not making satisfactory progress toward a high school diploma, modified diploma or an extended diploma and has not considered enrolling in post-secondary education.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 327.800
Stat. Implemented: ORS 327.815
Hist.: ODE 23-2013(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 10-18-13 thru 4-16-14; ODE 1-2014, f. & cert. ef. 2-19-14

581-017-0205

Establishment

(1) The Mentoring, Monitoring, Acceleration Grant is established as part of the Guidance and Support for Post-Secondary Aspirations Strategic Investment.

(2) The purposes of the grant is to:

(a) Extend or expand a students’ ability to achieve a “C” or higher within the current academic year in all core subjects;

(b) Increase the academic achievement for underserved and at-risk students in addition to the cultural competence within academic communities; and

(c) Create, expand or replicate programs that achieve the purposes of the grant.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 327.800
Stat. Implemented: ORS 327.815
Hist.: ODE 23-2013(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 10-18-13 thru 4-16-14; ODE 1-2014, f. & cert. ef. 2-19-14

581-017-0210

Eligibility

The Department of Education shall allocate funds for the Mentoring, Monitoring, Accelerated grant program based on the following eligibility criteria:

(1) The following entities shall be eligible to receive the Mentoring, Monitoring, Accelerated program award:

(a) Non-profit organizations;

(b) School districts; and

(c) Consortiums of non-profits or school districts and other entities. Each eligible consortium must have at least one non-profit organization or school district to be eligible for the grant which will serve as the fiscal agent.

(2) Eligible non-profit organizations and school districts must have a comprehensive system for monitoring progress and providing individualized planning, mentoring, tutoring or other support services to students or must have as part their proposal a plan to have a comprehensive system.

(3) Eligible non-profit organizations and school districts must provide data documenting and must ensure that the resources received will be used for underserved, at-risk or accelerating students in eighth or ninth grade.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 327.800
Stat. Implemented: ORS 327.815
Hist.: ODE 23-2013(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 10-18-13 thru 4-16-14; ODE 1-2014, f. & cert. ef. 2-19-14

581-017-0215

Implementation of Grant Funding

(1) The Department of Education will make awards between $50,000 and $250,000 for use during the 2013–2014 or 2014–2015 school year for each eligible Mentoring, Monitoring, Accelerated grant program. The Department may not award more than $3 million in total per biennium for the grants.

(2) The Oregon Department of Education shall establish a request for proposal solicitation and approval process to be conducted for the Mentoring, Monitoring, Acceleration program funds. All proposals will comply with the requirements of ORS 327.800 and 327.815 and rules adopted to implement those sections.

(3) Awards will be based on the following criteria:

(a) Whether the proposal identifies how the funds will be used to reach the 40-40-20 goal and improve education outcomes for underserved and at risk and accelerating students as identified by the Oregon Education Investment Board Equity Lens document.

(b) Whether the applicant proposal demonstrates support, commitment and readiness to design or revise culturally competent programming specifically for underserved/at-risk eighth and ninth grade students.

(4) The Department shall give priority to proposals that meet the minimum criteria and:

(a) Provide a sustainability plan to continue the program for at least two years after the program funding has ended.

(b) The extent to which the applicant clearly documents its capacity to implement and carry out programming and services for students achieving a “C” or higher in core academic subjects within the current academic year.

(5) The Department of Education shall allocate funds for the grant program based on the evaluation of the grant application and the following considerations:

(a) Organizations who have documented evidence of serving underserved/at-risk eighth and ninth grade students and/or drop outs.

(b) Organizations designed to return or advance eighth or ninth grade students to a “C” or higher grade in core academic subjects within the same academic year using a systematic program design.

(c) Geographic location of the program organization to ensure geographic representation of the targeted student groups are included throughout the state.

(d) Organizations currently serving eighth and ninth grade underserved or at risk students that could improve academic levels to “C” or higher in core academic subjects with additional resources.

(e) Organizations that have a high level of students who are at or below a “C” in core academic subjects.

(f) Give preference to organizations that have demonstrated success by improving student academic outcomes.

(6) Each award may be up to $250,000 which shall be given during the following phases based on a detailed budget narrative and budget template:

(a) Planning phase;

(b) Implementation phase; and

(c) Evaluation phase.

(7) Grant recipients shall use funds received for the planning, implementation, and evaluation phases of the grant for activities outlined in the request for proposal.

(8) Grant recipients must be able to expend the funds for allowable purposes specified in the request for proposal within the grant timeline according to acceptable accounting procedures.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 327.800
Stat. Implemented: ORS 327.815
Hist.: ODE 23-2013(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 10-18-13 thru 4-16-14; ODE 1-2014, f. & cert. ef. 2-19-14

581-017-0220

Timelines and Performance Measures

The Oregon Department of Education shall provide award recipients a template for an interim and final grant report. Recipients are required to submit the interim and final report prior to receiving their final request for funds.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 327.800
Stat. Implemented: ORS 327.815
Hist.: ODE 23-2013(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 10-18-13 thru 4-16-14; ODE 1-2014, f. & cert. ef. 2-19-14

Career Pathway Funding

581-017-0287

Definitions

The following definitions apply to OAR 581-017-0287 to 581-017-0297:

(1) “Annual Pathway Allocation Maximum” means the maximum amount that can be allocated to one district in a given fiscal year as determined by the Department of Education.

(2) “Career Pathway Funding” means the funding allocation established by section 1, chapter 763, Oregon Laws 2015 (Enrolled HB 3072).

(3) “High Demand” means having more than the median number of total (growth plus replacement) openings for statewide or a particular region.

(4) “High Wage” means a wage that is more than the all-industry, all-ownership median wage for statewide or a particular region.

(5) “Historically Underserved student” means an English language learner, a student of color, an economically disadvantaged student or a student with disabilities.

(6) “Industry Credential” means certification that can lead to a high wage and high demand job and has been approved by the Department of Education.

(7) “Pathway to a high wage and high demand job” means a program of study offered in the current school year that provides students with the training necessary for the student to obtain a high wage high and demand job upon graduation, or enroll in post-high school training or education that will lead to a high wage and high demand job.

(8) “Program of Study” means a sequence of courses, aligned to industry standards at the secondary and post-secondary level, that integrates technical and career skill proficiencies with academic content and has been approved by the Oregon Department of Education.

(9) “Qualifying student” means:

(a) A student who earned at least three high school credits in a career and technical education program of study that is a pathway to high wage and high demand jobs;

(b) A student who acquired an industry credential while enrolled in high school in a career and technical education program of study; and

(c) A student who meets the qualifications set forth in subsection (8)(a) or (b) and is historically underserved.

Stat. Auth.: 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Stat. Implemented: 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Hist.: ODE 25-2015, f. & cert. ef. 12-18-15

581-017-0291

Purpose

The purpose of the Career Pathway Grant is to fund activities related to career and technical education programs of study that are pathways to high wage high demand jobs.

Stat. Auth.: 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Stat. Implemented: 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Hist.: ODE 25-2015, f. & cert. ef. 12-18-15

581-017-0294

Funding

(1) The Department of Education shall determine for each fiscal year the portion of the funds available for the Career Pathway Funding allocation and the annual pathway allocation maximum.

(2) Prior to the allocation in each fiscal year, the Department of Education shall:

(a) Determine which programs of study are pathways to a high wage and high demand job;

(b) Identify qualifying students enrolled in the prior school year at each district; and

(c) Report the data to the CTE Regional Coordinators for verification of accuracy.

(d) For each qualifying student enrolled in a district in the prior school year, the district will earn one point for purposes of the allocation formula in section (4) of this rule. If one qualifying student meets the qualifications of more than one section in 581-017-0287(8), the district will earn more than one point, up to three points total.

(e) The Department shall determine the amount of the allocation to each school district based on the following formula:

Allocation Amount = number of points earned by a school district in the prior school year x (the total amount available for distribution for Career Pathway Funding in a fiscal year / the total number of points in the State in the prior school year), not to exceed the annual pathway allocation maximum.

(f) Funds received by a school district under this section must be separately accounted for and must be distributed to the career and technical education program of study that served the qualifying students for which the funds were received. If a program of study is no longer in existence, the school district may not receive Career Pathway Funds for the qualifying students served by the defunct program.

Stat. Auth.: 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Stat. Implemented: 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Hist.: ODE 25-2015, f. & cert. ef. 12-18-15

581-017-0297

Reporting

School districts are responsible for the following reporting to the Oregon Department of Education. Prior to the allocation in each fiscal year, a school district must provide the following written assurances to the Department of Education:

(1) The money received through the career pathway funding allocation will not supplant current funding provided by the district for career and technical education; and

(2) The career technical education teacher, regional coordinator, and school administration will be involved in any decision making regarding how to use the career pathway allocation funds.

(3) Funds received will only be spent on the career and technical education program of study that served the qualifying students for which the funds were received. Prior to the end of each school year, a school district that has received an allocation of the career pathway funding must file with the Department:

(a) An expenditure report; and

(b) Verification that the career pathway funding allocation did not supplant funding provided by the district for career and technical education.

Stat. Auth.: 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Stat. Implemented: 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Hist.: ODE 25-2015, f. & cert. ef. 12-18-15

Connecting to the World of Work STEM, STEAM and CTE

581-017-0301

Definitions

The following definitions apply to 581-017-0300 to 581-017-0333:

(1) “Achievement Gap” means the gap in achievement (state test scores in science and mathematics as well as postsecondary degree attainment in STEM) that often exists between students who are economically disadvantaged, students learning English as a second language, African American, Hispanic or Native American compared to their peers.

(2) “Authentic Problem-Based Learning” means using real world questions, problems, and tasks—often drawn from local community issues and industries—as the focus to drive the learning experiences, deepen understanding, and developing rich contextual connections across a variety of STEM and non-STEM disciplines.

(3) “Career and Technical Education (CTE)” is a comprehensive educational program for students based on industry needs. CTE includes coursework in areas such as health care, engineering, and computer science.

(4) “Community Engagement” means a broad collaboration and participation between multiple sectors of the community for the mutually beneficial exchange of knowledge and resources to identify local needs and contribute to larger conversations on visioning planning which may include, but not limited to parent groups and advocacy groups, industry and STEM agencies, economic and workforce groups, student input, and educators.

(5) “Education service district” or “ESD” means an education service district as defined in ORS 334.003.

(6) “Effective STEM Instruction” means the use of evidence-based practices that support interconnected, relevant STEM instruction as stated in definition number one.

(7) “Effective STEM Leadership” means identifying schools, school districts, postsecondary institutions, business & industry, student-focused nonprofits and community leadership to support implementing and improving STEM teaching and learning in addition to creating a culture that fosters STEM learning with evidence-based resources. Effective STEM leadership develops an understanding of what effective and interconnected STEM education looks like in the classroom and supports the development of learning environments that empower educators to implement innovative STEM education approaches.

(8) “Effective STEM Learning Environments” means supporting student interaction with STEM education during formal and informal settings in ways that promote deeper understanding of real-world complex concepts. Such learning environments need to engage all students in solving complex problems, using highly interactive learning opportunities that create new opportunities for STEM learning across the core curriculum.

(9) “Equity Lens” refers to the commitment and principles adopted by the Oregon Education Investment Board to address inequities of access, opportunity, interest, and attainment for underserved and underrepresented populations in all current and future strategic investments.

(10) “Postsecondary Institution” means a:

(a) A community college operated under ORS Chapter 341.

(b) The following public universities within the Oregon University System:

(A) University of Oregon.

(B) Oregon State University.

(C) Portland State University.

(D) Oregon Institute of Technology.

(E) Western Oregon University.

(F) Southern Oregon University.

(G) Eastern Oregon University.

(c) Oregon Health and Science University.

(d) An Oregon-based, generally accredited, not-for-profit institution of higher education.

(11) “Regional STEM Hub” means a commitment of a group of key stakeholders from different sectors such as, but not limited to school districts, informal education providers, postsecondary institutions, business & industry, student-focused nonprofits, students, families, community members and policy makers to advance state and local educational goals related to science, technology, engineering, mathematics and career & technical education (CTE).

(12) “Statewide STEM Network” means a supportive collaboration between and across Regional STEM Hubs to share knowledge, expertise, insights, and leadership to assist other communities in their efforts to create similar STEM partnerships.

(13) “STEM Education” means an approach to teaching and lifelong learning that emphasizes the natural interconnectedness of the four separate STEM disciplines. Developing and deepening content knowledge and skills in science and mathematics is the foundation of STEM teaching and learning. The natural connections among science, mathematics and STEM are made explicit through collaboration between educators resulting in real and appropriate context built into instruction, curriculum, and assessment. The common element of problem solving is emphasized across all STEM disciplines allowing students to discover, explore, and apply critical thinking skills as they learn.

(14) “STEM Practitioners” refers to individuals engaged in STEM-related professions such as but not limited to, natural resources management, high-tech manufacturing and product development, information technology, industrial design, health sciences, software, scientific research, engineering, data analytics, etc.

(15) “Student-Focused Nonprofits” means an organization that meets all of the following requirements:

(a) Is established as a nonprofit organization under the laws of Oregon;

(b) Qualifies as an exempt organization under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code as defined in ORS 314.011; and

(c) Is focused on providing services to students who’s goals or mission are focused on impacting and improving outcomes in STEM education.

(16) “Underserved Students” are students whom systems have placed at risk because of their race, ethnicity, English language proficiency, socioeconomic status, gender, sexual orientation, differently abled, or geographic location.

(17) “Underrepresented Students” in STEM are from demographic groups who’s representation in STEM fields and industries does not mirror regional and national focus populations specifically, women, African American, Native American, Hispanic and Pacific Islander students which systems have provided insufficient or inadequate balance of opportunity.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 327.820; 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Stat. Implemented: ORS 327.820; 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Hist.: ODE 30-2014, f. & cert. ef. 6-24-14; ODE 15-2015(Temp), f. 9-25-15, cert. ef. 9-28-15 thru 3-15-16

581-017-0302

Fiscal Agent for CTE and STEM grants

The following entities shall be eligible to be the fiscal agent for the grants available under 581-017-0301 to 0333:

(1) School districts;

(2) Education service district (ESD) as defined in ORS 334.003;

(3) Public schools;

(4) Public charter schools;

(5) Community Colleges; and

(6) Public Universities.

Stat. Auth.: 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Stat. Implemented: 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Hist.: ODE 15-2015(Temp), f. 9-25-15, cert. ef. 9-28-15 thru 3-15-16

Oregon Regional STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) Hub Grant

581-017-0306

Establishment of Regional STEM Hubs

(1) The Regional STEM Hub Grant is established as part of the Connecting to the World of Work Program.

(2) The purposes of these Regional STEM Hubs includes, but is not limited to:

(a) Engage school districts, post-secondary institutions, student-focused nonprofit organizations, business and industry around common outcomes related to increasing students’ proficiency, interest, and attainment in science, technology, engineering and mathematics along with career and technical education.

(b) Align STEM program activities and leverage State and local resources, both financial and human, around common student outcomes to advance the State 40/40/20 goals.

(c) Address ongoing access, opportunity, interest, and attainment gaps for underserved and underrepresented students in STEM consistent with the Equity Lens.

(d) Engage local communities to elevate the importance of STEM to the prosperity of individuals, and the local and state economy.

(e) Promote effective instructional practices by providing professional learning opportunities and to support educators in ways that are consistent with the implementation of the Common Core State Standards and Oregon Science Standards.

(f) Provide age-appropriate career exploration opportunities in STEM for students along the education continuum including career guidance, tours, and internships.

(g) Expand effective STEM learning experiences for students both in and out of school.

(h) Share knowledge, expertise, insights, and leadership to assist other communities in their efforts to create similar STEM partnerships.

(i) Foster greater coherency across institutions to smooth student transitions and support services along education and career pathways.

(j) Diminish the sense of academic isolation and silos, both locally and statewide.

(k) Increase interactions of STEM practitioners with students and educators.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 327.820
Stat. Implemented: ORS 327.820
Hist.: ODE 30-2014, f. & cert. ef. 6-24-14; ODE 15-2015(Temp), f. 9-25-15, cert. ef. 9-28-15 thru 3-15-16

581-017-0309

Eligibility of Regional STEM Hubs

The Oregon Department of Education shall allocate funds for Regional STEM Hubs based on the following criteria:

(1) The following entities shall be eligible for the Regional STEM Hub Grant:

(a) Existing STEM Hubs;

(b) School districts;

(c) Education service districts;

(d) Student-focused nonprofit organizations;

(e) Postsecondary institutions for the purpose of supporting STEM & CTE education; and

(f) Any of the nine federally recognized Native American Tribes in Oregon.

(2) A Regional STEM Hub must be established by a school district, postsecondary institutions or student-focused nonprofit and is required to include the following additional partners at a minimum:

(a) A School District or ESD,

(b) A Postsecondary Education Partner,

(c) A Student-focused nonprofit; and

(d) An Industry, Business or STEM focused Community Partner.

(3) A Regional STEM Hub must be able to demonstrative that the Hub has the following five key elements:

(a) A common agenda;

(b) Shared measurement systems;

(c) Mutually reinforcing activities;

(d) Continuous communication; and

(e) Backbone support organizations.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 327.820; 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Stat. Implemented: ORS 327.820; 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Hist.: ODE 30-2014, f. & cert. ef. 6-24-14; ODE 15-2015(Temp), f. 9-25-15, cert. ef. 9-28-15 thru 3-15-16

581-017-0312

Criteria of Regional STEM Hubs Awards

(1) The Oregon Department of Education shall establish a solicitation and approval process to be conducted each biennium for which the Regional STEM Hub grant funds for operations support and program support are available. The solicitation and approval process must comply with the requirements of section 1, Chapter 763, Oregon Law 2015 (Enrolled House Bill 3072) and rules adopted to implement that section.

(2) The Oregon Department of Education may only award grants for operations support to Regional STEM Hubs which meet the minimum criteria by having a record of success in, or clearly established plans for, addressing the following:

(a) Establishing a partnership for a Regional STEM Hub consisting of the partners identified in OAR 581-017-0309(2);

(b) Selecting and supporting a backbone organization to coordinate and support the various partners of the Regional STEM Hub and ensure effective communication, a focus on data and outcomes, and alignment of programing to address the STEM-related nees of the community; and

(c) Creating, implementing, and improving a Partnership Plan that guides the vision, goals, strategies, and outcomes of the Regional STEM Hub; incorporates the principles of the Equity Lens adopted by the Chief Education Office; and contributes to the achievement of the State’s education goals and the STEM-related goals identified by the STEM Investment Council.

(3) The Oregon Department of Education may only award grants for program support to Regional STEM Hubs which meet the minimum criteria by having a record of success in or clearly established plans for addressing the following:

(a) An established Regional STEM Hub with a formalized and approved Partnership Plan, and contributions by partners of human, material, and financial resources;

(b) An established backbone organization to coordinate and support the various partners of the Regional STEM Hub and ensuring effective communication, a focus on data & outcomes, and aligning programming to address the STEM-related needs of the community; and

(c) An approved Partnership Plan that guides the vision, goals, strategies, and outcomes of the Regional STEM Hub; incorporates the principles of the Equity Lens adopted by the Chief Education Office; and contributes to the achievement of the State’s education goals and the STEM-related goals identified by the STEM Investment Council.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 327.820; 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Stat. Implemented: ORS 327.820; 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Hist.: ODE 30-2014, f. & cert. ef. 6-24-14; ODE 15-2015(Temp), f. 9-25-15, cert. ef. 9-28-15 thru 3-15-16

581-017-0315

Implementation of Grant Funding of Regional STEM Hubs

(1) The Oregon Department of Education shall allocate funds to support the operations and programs of expanding and newly established Regional STEM Hubs.

(2) The Department of Education, in collaboration with the Chief Education Office and the STEM Council, shall determine for each biennium the portion of the funds available for operations support and program support grants.

(3) Grantees and the associated Regional STEM Hub will be expected to:

(a) Participate in data collection and reporting progress against agreed upon outcomes determined by the Chief Education Office, the STEM Investment Council, and the Oregon Department of Education;

(b) Engage in mutually reinforcing activities for improving STEM/CTE education with partners within and outside the formal education system;

(c) Engage in collaboration and communication, within and between Regional STEM Hubs, including regular coordination calls, site visits, and convenings; and

(d) Identify and select a backbone organization to coordinate and support the various partners of the Regional STEM Hub and ensuring effective communication, a focus on data & outcomes, and aligning programming to address the STEM-related needs of the community.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 327.820; 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Stat. Implemented: ORS 327.820; 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Hist.: ODE 30-2014, f. & cert. ef. 6-24-14; ODE 15-2015(Temp), f. 9-25-15, cert. ef. 9-28-15 thru 3-15-16

581-017-0318

Reporting of Regional STEM Hubs

(1) The Department of Education shall develop partnership-reporting requirements for allocation of funds for implementation of Regional STEM Hubs as required by the Chief Education Office.

(2) The Department of Education, in collaboration with the STEM Investment Council and the committee established under ORS 344.075, shall submit a biennial report to the Legislative Assembly related to distributions made under this section. The report must include metrics that identify how distributions made under this section are contributing to the development of a skilled workforce that is able to secure high wage and high demand jobs.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 327.820; 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Stat. Implemented: ORS 327.820; 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Hist.: ODE 30-2014, f. & cert. ef. 6-24-14; ODE 15-2015(Temp), f. 9-25-15, cert. ef. 9-28-15 thru 3-15-16

Science Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Innovation Grants

581-017-0321

Establishment of the STEM Innovation Grants

The purpose of the STEM Innovation Grant Program is to award grants that expand the implementation of effective programs relating to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, that:

(1) Propose innovative approaches to STEM-based education; or

(2) Provide professional development relating to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 327.820; 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 327.820; 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Hist.: ODE 30-2014, f. & cert. ef. 6-24-14; ODE 34-2015(Temp) f. 12-23-15, cert. ef. 12-28-15 thru 4-1-16

581-017-0324

Eligibility of STEM Innovation Grant

The Oregon Department of Education shall allocate funds for the STEM Innovation Grant. The following entities are able to apply for the STEM Innovation Grant:

(1) STEM Hubs;

(2) School districts;

(3) Education service districts as defined in ORS 334.003

(4) Public schools;

(5) Public charter schools;

(6) Student-focused nonprofit organizations who are in partnership with an eligible fiscal agent under OAR 581-017-0302; or

(7) Post-secondary institutions who are, or are in partnership with, an eligible fiscal agent under OAR 581-017-0302.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 327.820; 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Stats. Implemented: ORS 327.820; 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Hist.: ODE 30-2014, f. & cert. ef. 6-24-14; ODE 34-2015(Temp) f. 12-23-15, cert. ef. 12-28-15 thru 4-1-16

581-017-0327

Criteria of STEM Innovation Grant

(1) The Oregon Department of Education shall establish a request for proposal, application, or direct grant solicitation and approval process to be conducted each biennium for which the STEM Innovation Grant funds are available.

(2) Eligible recipients will focus on STEM related education with a specific agenda that demonstrates a record of success or clearly established plans for addressing the following through innovative approaches:

(a) Closing the achievement gap for students who are historically underserved students or underrepresented in STEM or both with innovative approaches;

(b) Supporting effective implementation of Oregon’s academic standards and relevant technical skills;

(c) Successfully moving students along a P-20 STEM workforce pathway; and

(d) Engaging all students in meaningful, authentic problem-based learning.

(3) The Department shall give priority to proposals that meet the minimum criteria and clearly demonstrates how the grant funds will be used to address the following:

(A) Establish how underserved and underrepresented students will be engaged and have increased learning opportunities;

(B) Support new or expand STEM programs and activities;

(C) Demonstrate a long-term sustainability plan; and

(D) Collaborate with local business and industry partners or Regional STEM Hubs or both.

(4) The Department of Education may consider the geographic location of grant applicants to ensure geographic diversity within the recipients of grant program funds throughout the state.

(5) Eligible recipients must have a comprehensive system for measuring students’ quantitative and qualitative outcomes.

Stat. Auth.: 2013 OL Ch. 661, Sec. 4 (Enrolled HB 3232)
Stats. Implemented: 2013 OL Ch. 661, Sec. 4 (Enrolled HB 3232)
Hist.: ODE 30-2014, f. & cert. ef. 6-24-14; ODE 34-2015(Temp) f. 12-23-15, cert. ef. 12-28-15 thru 4-1-16

581-017-0330

Implementation of STEM Innovation Grant

(1) The Oregon Department of Education, in collaboration with the Chief Education Office and the STEM Council, shall determine for each biennium the funds available for the STEM Innovation Grants.

(2) STEM Innovation Grant funds received by a grantee must be separately accounted for and may be used only to provide funding for the purposes described in the application of the grant recipient.

Stat. Auth.: 2013 OL Ch. 661, Sec. 4 (Enrolled HB 3232)
Stats. Implemented: 2013 OL Ch. 661, Sec. 4 (Enrolled HB 3232)
Hist.: ODE 30-2014, f. & cert. ef. 6-24-14; ODE 34-2015(Temp) f. 12-23-15, cert. ef. 12-28-15 thru 4-1-16

581-017-0333

Reporting of STEM Innovation Grant

Recipients of the STEM Innovation Grant must report on the grant to the Department of Education. The report must include metrics developed by the Department of Education, in collaboration with the STEM Council and the Chief Education Office.

Stat. Auth.: 2013 OL Ch. 661, Sec. 4 (Enrolled HB 3232)
Stats. Implemented: 2013 OL Ch. 661, Sec. 4 (Enrolled HB 3232)
Hist.: ODE 30-2014, f. & cert. ef. 6-24-14; ODE 34-2015(Temp) f. 12-23-15, cert. ef. 12-28-15 thru 4-1-16

Oregon STEM (Science, Technology, Engineeringand Mathematics) Lab School Grant

581-017-0335

Definitions and Establishment of STEM Lab Schools

(1) The following definitions apply to 581-017-0335 TO 581-017-0347:

(a) “Achievement Gap” means the gap in achievement (state test scores in science and mathematics as well as postsecondary degree attainment in STEM) that often exists between students who are economically disadvantaged, students learning English as a second language, African American, Hispanic or Native American compared to their peers.

(b) “Authentic Problem-Based Learning” means using real world questions, problems, and tasks — often drawn from local community issues and industries — as the focus to drive the learning experiences, deepen understanding, and developing rich contextual connections across a variety of STEM and non-STEM disciplines.

(c) “Career and Technical Education (CTE)” is a comprehensive educational program for students based on industry needs. CTE includes coursework in areas such as health care, engineering, and computer science.

(d) “Community Engagement” means a broad collaboration and participation between multiple sectors of the community for the mutually beneficial exchange of knowledge and resources to identify local needs and contribute to larger conversations on visioning planning which may include, but not limited to parent groups and advocacy groups, industry and STEM agencies, economic and workforce groups, student input, and educators.

(e) “Effective STEM Instruction” means the use of evidence-based practices that support interconnected, relevant STEM instruction as stated in definition number fourteen.

(f) “Effective STEM Leadership” means identifying schools, school districts, postsecondary institutions, business & industry, student-focused nonprofits and community leadership to support implementing and improving STEM teaching and learning in addition to creating a culture that fosters STEM learning with evidence-based resources. Effective STEM leadership develops an understanding of what effective and interconnected STEM education looks like in the classroom and supports the development of learning environments that empower educators to implement innovative STEM education approaches.

(g) “Effective STEM Learning Environments” means supporting student interaction with STEM education during formal and informal settings in ways that promote deeper understanding of real-world concepts. Such learning environments must engage all students in solving complex problems, using highly interactive learning opportunities that create new opportunities for STEM learning across the core curriculum.

(h) “Equity Lens” refers to the commitment and principles adopted by the Oregon Education Investment Board to address inequities of access, opportunity, interest, and attainment for underserved and underrepresented populations in all current and future strategic investments.

(i) “Postsecondary Institution” means:

(A) A community college operated under ORS Chapter 341.

(B) The following public universities within the Oregon University System:

(i) University of Oregon.

(ii) Oregon State University.

(iii) Portland State University.

(iv) Oregon Institute of Technology.

(v) Western Oregon University.

(vi) Southern Oregon University.

(vii) Eastern Oregon University.

(viii) Oregon Health and Science University.

(C) An Oregon-based, generally accredited, not-for-profit institution of higher education.

(j) “Regional STEM Hub” means a commitment of a group of key stakeholders from different sectors such as, but not limited to school districts, informal education providers, postsecondary institutions, business & industry, student-focused nonprofits, students, families, community members and policy makers to advance state and local educational goals related to science, technology, engineering, mathematics and career & technical education (CTE).

(k) “School” means a public middle school, high school, community college, or postsecondary institution offering a comprehensive instructional program. A school may include a discreet comprehensive instructional program within a larger school or college.

(l) “Statewide STEM Network” means a supportive collaboration between and across Regional STEM Hubs to share knowledge, expertise, insights, and leadership to assist other communities in their efforts to create similar STEM partnerships.

(m) “STEAM Education” means the incorporation of strategies to enhance science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education by integrating art and design, and promoting creative possibilities.

(n) “STEM Education” means an approach to teaching and lifelong learning that emphasizes the natural interconnectedness of the four separate STEM disciplines which mirrors the practices and rich contexts of STEM practitioners. Developing and deepening content knowledge and skills in science and mathematics is the foundation of STEM teaching and learning. The natural connections among science, mathematics and STEM are made explicit through collaboration between educators resulting in authentic and appropriate context built into instruction, curriculum, and assessment. The common element of problem solving is emphasized across all STEM disciplines allowing students to discover, explore, and apply critical thinking skills as they learn.

(o) “STEM Lab School” means to establish a school that has a student-centered school culture of inquiry with meaningful and authentic learning environments that integrate STEM and/or STEAM education aligned with state, national and industry standards. This cutting-edge learning center will deepen connections between other educational institutions, business, industry, out-of-school educators, and the local community to create and promote STEM career pathways for students. An intentional focus of a lab school is to support the professional learning of current and future educators, the implementation of innovative education models, and educational research in a manner that increases knowledge and capacity of systems and institutions beyond the school itself.

(p) “STEM Practitioners” refers to individuals engaged in STEM-related professions such as but not limited to, natural resources management, high-tech manufacturing and product development, information technology, industrial design, health sciences, software, scientific research, engineering, data analytics, etc.

(q) “Student-Focused Nonprofits” means an organization that meets all of the following requirements:

(A) Is established as a nonprofit organization under the laws of Oregon;

(B) Qualifies as an exempt organization under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code as defined in ORS 314.011; and

(C) Is focused on providing services to students and/or educators who’s goals or mission are focused on impacting and improving student outcomes in STEM education.

(r) “Underserved Students” are students whom systems have placed at risk because of their race, ethnicity, English language proficiency, socioeconomic status, gender, sexual orientation, differently abled, or geographic location.

(s) “Underrepresented Students” in STEM are from demographic groups whose representation in STEM fields and industries does not mirror regional and national focus populations specifically, women, African American, Native American, Hispanic and Pacific Islander students which systems have provided insufficient or inadequate balance of opportunity.

(2) The STEM Lab Schools Grant is established as part of the Connecting to the World of Work Program.

(3) The purpose of the STEM Lab School Grant is to:

(a) Engage middle school, high school and/or community college students in authentic, inquiry-based learning environments that increase experiential learning opportunities focused on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education and design-related industries to improve, enhance, and enrich students’ problem-solving capabilities and to foster 21st Century Skills.

(b) Address ongoing access, opportunity, interest and attainment gaps for underserved and underrepresented students in STEM and design-related industries consistent with the Equity Lens.

(c) Promote more effective STEM and design-related industries instructional practices consistent with Common Core State Standards, Oregon State Science Standards and Oregon State Arts Standards by offering educator professional learning opportunities.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 327.800
Stat. Implemented: ORS 327.820
Hist.: ODE 2-2014(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 2-19-14 thru 8-17-14; ODE 31-2014, f. & cert. ef. 6-24-14

581-017-0338

Eligibility of STEM Lab Schools

(1) The Oregon Department of Education may allocate funds for STEM Lab Schools to the following entities:

(a) Public Schools;

(b) School districts;

(c) Student-focused nonprofit organizations; or

(d) Postsecondary institutions for the purpose of supporting STEM education.

(2) A single grant proposal may include more than one eligible applicant and other entities but the lead agency for the proposal must be one of entities listed in subsection (1) of this rule.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 327.800
Stat. Implemented: ORS 327.820
Hist.: ODE 2-2014(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 2-19-14 thru 8-17-14; ODE 31-2014, f. & cert. ef. 6-24-14

581-017-0341

Criteria of STEM Lab Schools

(1) The Oregon Department of Education shall establish a request for proposal solicitation and approval process to be conducted each biennium for which the STEM Lab School grant funds are available. All proposals must comply with the requirements of ORS 327.800 and 327.820 and rules adopted to implement those statutes.

(2) Eligible public schools, school districts, postsecondary institutions, and student-focused nonprofit organizations will focus on STEM education and design-related industry with a specific agenda that demonstrates a record of success or clearly established plans for addressing the following:

(a) Closing the achievement gap for underserved students and those underrepresented in STEM fields with innovative approaches.

(b) Support effective implementation of the Common Core State Standards, the Oregon State Science Standards and the Oregon State Arts Standards.

(c) Successfully move students along a P-20 STEM workforce pathway.

(d) Engage students in meaningful, authentic, problem-based learning that will support the Oregon’s 40-40-20 goal.

(e) Provide professional learning opportunities that support educator effectiveness.

(3) Eligible public schools, school districts, student-focused nonprofit organizations, and post-secondary institutions must have a comprehensive system for measuring students’ quantitative and qualitative outcomes, provide documented data and ensure that the resources received will be used to provide STEM career pathway opportunities to students.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 327.800
Stat. Implemented: ORS 327.820
Hist.: ODE 2-2014(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 2-19-14 thru 8-17-14; ODE 31-2014, f. & cert. ef. 6-24-14

581-017-0344

Implementation of Grant Funding of STEM Lab Schools

(1) The Oregon Department of Education shall allocate funds to support STEM Lab Schools.

(2) Each grantee may receive funds between $300,000 and $700,000 for use during the 2013–2015 biennium.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 327.800
Stat. Implemented: ORS 327.820
Hist.: ODE 2-2014(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 2-19-14 thru 8-17-14; ODE 31-2014, f. & cert. ef. 6-24-14

581-017-0347

Reporting of STEM Lab Schools

The Department of Education shall develop partnership-reporting requirements for allocation of funds for implementation of STEM Lab Schools as required by the Oregon Education Investment Board.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 327.800
Stat. Implemented: ORS 327.820
Hist.: ODE 2-2014(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 2-19-14 thru 8-17-14; ODE 31-2014, f. & cert. ef. 6-24-14

Eastern Promise Replication Grant Program

581-017-0350

Definitions

The following definitions apply to OAR 581-017-0350 to 581-017-0362:

(1) “Consortium” means the equal partnership developed to form the cross-sector collaboration between eligible educational institutions.

(2) “Opportunity Gap” means the gap in opportunities that often exists between students who are economically disadvantaged, students with disabilities, students learning English as a second language, African American, Hispanic or Native American when compared to their peers who do not share these characteristics. This can often lead to a gap in achievement (state test scores in reading, writing, and mathematics as well as diploma and post-secondary degree attainment).

(3) “Postsecondary Institution” means:

(a) A community college operated under ORS Chapter 341 or,

(b) The following public universities:

(A) University of Oregon;

(B) Oregon State University;

(C) Portland State University;

(D) Oregon Institute of Technology;

(E) Western Oregon University;

(F) Southern Oregon University;

(G) Eastern Oregon University;

(H) Oregon Health and Science University.

(c) An Oregon-based accredited not-for-profit institution of higher education.

(4) “Private post-secondary institution” means” an Oregon-based, generally accredited, not-for-profit institution of higher education.

(5) “Significant population” means to serve the majority of underserved students within the consortiums region.

(6) “Underserved student” means a student (English language learner, student of color, an economically disadvantaged student or a student with disabilities) who has not historically taken high school accelerated courses and may not have considered enrolling in a post-secondary education program.

(7) “Variety” means students having access to a choice of courses offered in core academic subjects, in different forums (which include yet are not limited to distance learning, high school campus, college campus, by proficiency assessment or through credit for prior learning), that are eligible for transfer.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 327.800
Stat. Implemented: ORS 327.820
Hist.: ODE 3-2014(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 2-19-14 thru 8-17-14; ODE 29-2014, f. & cert. ef. 6-24-14; ODE 17-2015(Temp), f. 9-25-15, cert. ef. 9-28-15 thru 3-14-16

581-017-0353

Eastern Promise Replication Grant Program Establishment

(1) The Eastern Promise Replication Grant is established as part of the Connecting the World to Work Program Strategic Investment under ORS 327.820.

(2) The purposes of the grant are to:

(a) Connect students to the World of Work;

(b) Develop consortiums of school districts, education service districts and post-secondary institutions of higher education committed to developing innovative and flexible pathways for students in grades 6 through 12 and in community colleges; and

(c) Distribute moneys to consortiums that include at least three school districts, at least one education service district, at least one community college and at least one public or private post-secondary institution to design and deliver individualized, innovative and flexible ways of delivering content, awarding high school and college credit and providing development education for students in high school or in the first two years of post-secondary education.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 327.800
Stat. Implemented: ORS 327.820
Hist.: ODE 3-2014(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 2-19-14 thru 8-17-14; ODE 29-2014, f. & cert. ef. 6-24-14

581-017-0356

Eligibility

The Department of Education shall allocate funds for the Eastern Promise Replication Program grant to consortiums that consist of at least three school districts, at least one education service district, at least one community college and at least one public or private post-secondary institution.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 327.800
Stat. Implemented: ORS 327.820
Hist.: ODE 3-2014(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 2-19-14 thru 8-17-14; ODE 29-2014, f. & cert. ef. 6-24-14

581-017-0359

Implementation of Grant Funding

(1) The Department of Education will make awards between $465,000 and $650,000 (adjusted by justifiable need) for use during the 2014–2015 school year for replication of the Eastern Promise program.

(2) The Oregon Department of Education shall establish a request for proposal solicitation and approval process to be conducted for the Eastern Promise Replication program funds. All proposals will comply with the requirements of ORS 327.800 and 327.820(3)(a)(D) and rules adopted to implement those sections.

(3) Awards will be based on the following criteria:

(a) Whether the proposal identifies how the funds will be used to reach the 40-40-20 goal by replicating the core pillars of Eastern Promise early college experiences and Professional Learning Communities.

(b) Whether the applicant proposal demonstrates support, commitment and readiness to design or revise programming specifically for offering early college experiences and developing Professional Learning Communities.

(c) Whether there is a commitment to cross-sector collaboration between a university, community college(s), education service district(s), and districts where each partner is engaged as an equal partner.

(d) Whether there is a commitment to providing students with a variety of accelerated learning opportunities, such as on-campus experiences, dual credit, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, and to ensuring students receive support and specific instruction around the knowledge, skills and behaviors necessary to be successful in college-level coursework.

(e) Whether there is a commitment to developing cross-sector professional learning, including faculty and teachers from the university, community college and ESD/high schools of like disciplines. The consortium will ensure that all levels of instruction are represented and participate in discussing and establishing the appropriate curriculum, and in developing appropriate and shared assessment parameters to measure outcomes.

(f) Whether there is a commitment to building a college-going culture, which refers to the environment, attitudes, and practices in schools and communities that encourage students and their families to obtain the information, tools, and perspective to enhance access to and success in postsecondary education. The applicant should describe a plan for one or more, programs servicing students, beginning in middle grades, that:

(A) Helps students learn about options for their future, careers and the education they require;

(B) Convey the expectation that all students can prepare for the opportunity to attend and be successful in post-secondary education; and

(C) Ensure schools, families, and communities give students the same message of high expectations for their future.

(4) The Department shall give priority to proposals that meet the minimum criteria and:

(a) Provide a sustainability plan to continue the program for at least two years after the program funding has ended.

(b) The extent to which the applicant clearly documents its capacity to implement and carry out programming to replicate pillars of the Eastern Promise program.

(5) The Department of Education shall allocate funds for the grant program based on the evaluation of the grant application and the following considerations:

(a) Programs representing the core pillars of the Eastern Promise Early College Experience.

(b) Programs that exhibit innovative and flexible ways of delivering content, awarding high school and college credit and providing development education for students in high school or in the first two years of post-secondary education.

(c) The number of students the Early College Experience program will serve.

(d) Programs with a detailed process to identify, enroll, support and retain underserved students.

(e) Programs that have a high level of underserved students who historically have not taken high school accelerated courses.

(f) Geographic locations of the program organization to ensure geographic representation of the targeted student groups are included throughout the state.

(6) Each award may be between $465,000 and $650,000 which shall be given during the following phases based on a detailed budget narrative and budget template:

(a) Planning and Implementation phase

(b) Evaluation phase.

(7) Grant recipients shall use funds received for the planning, implementation, and evaluation phases of the grant for activities outlined in the request for proposal.

(8) Grant recipients must be able to expend the funds for allowable purposes specified in the request for proposal within the grant timeline according to acceptable accounting procedures by June 30, 2015.

(9) Grant recipients will document and account for each student enrolled in and completing accelerated college courses before the final distribution of grant funds.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 327.800
Stat. Implemented: ORS 327.820
Hist.: ODE 3-2014(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 2-19-14 thru 8-17-14; ODE 29-2014, f. & cert. ef. 6-24-14

581-017-0362

Timelines and Performance Measures

The Regional Promise program shall provide award recipients a template for an interim, legislative, and final grant report. Recipients are required to submit the all reports and teacher and student data prior to their final request for funds.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 327.800
Stat. Implemented: ORS 327.820
Hist.: ODE 3-2014(Temp), f. & cert. ef. 2-19-14 thru 8-17-14; ODE 29-2014, f. & cert. ef. 6-24-14; ODE 17-2015(Temp), f. 9-25-15, cert. ef. 9-28-15 thru 3-14-16; ODE 10-2016, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-16

K–12 Biliteracy Pathways Grant

581-017-0380

Definitions

The following definitions apply to OAR 581-017-0380 to 581-017-0395:

(1) “K–12 Biliteracy Pathways Grant” means the Grant established in OAR 581-017-0383 to implement ORS 336.079.

(2) “K–12 Biliteracy Pathway” means an educational program that begins in at least Kindergarten and continues through grade 12 that promotes biliteracy outcomes and provides students who complete this pathway with the skills necessary to earn a State Seal of Biliteracy. For the purposes of this grant, these pathways must include an existing dual language program that:

(a) Already serves students at the elementary school level;

(b) Also operates at or there are plans for expansion to the middle and high school level; and

(c) Is primarily designed to serve English Learners.

(3) “Dual language program” means any program that provides literacy and content instruction to all students through two languages and that promotes bilingualism and biliteracy, grade-level academic achievement, and multicultural competence for all students. This grant is intended to support dual language programs that are primarily designed to serve English Learners. These types of dual language programs are commonly referred to as two-way immersion, developmental bilingual, and heritage language programs.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 326.051
Stat. Implemented: ORS 336.079
Hist.: ODE 14-2015(Temp), f. 9-25-15, cert. ef. 9-28-15 thru 3-15-16; ODE 1-2016, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-16

581-017-0383

Establishment

There is established the K–12 Biliteracy Pathways Grant, which is intended to support Oregon public school districts or public charter schools to develop and implement model dual language programs and K–12 Biliteracy Pathways. This includes improving existing K–12 dual language programs, as well as expanding well-implemented elementary programs into middle and high school.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 326.051
Stat. Implemented: ORS 336.079
Hist.: ODE 14-2015(Temp), f. 9-25-15, cert. ef. 9-28-15 thru 3-15-16; ODE 1-2016, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-16

581-017-0386

Eligibility

(1) The following entities shall be eligible to receive the K–12 Biliteracy Pathways Grant:

(a) School districts

(b) Public charter schools; and

(c) Consortium of school districts, public charter schools or an Education Service District (ESD). Each consortium must have at least one school district or public charter school as a member.

(2) A single grant proposal may include more than one eligible applicant.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 326.051
Stat. Implemented: ORS 336.079
Hist.: ODE 14-2015(Temp), f. 9-25-15, cert. ef. 9-28-15 thru 3-15-16; ODE 1-2016, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-16

581-017-0389

Criteria

(1) The Oregon Department of Education (ODE) shall establish a request for proposal solicitation and approval process to be conducted each biennium for which the K–12 Biliteracy Pathways Grant funds are available.

(2) Grants shall be awarded based on the following criteria:

(a) Whether the grant application identifies how English Learners enrolled in the applicants school(s) will benefit from the proposed K–12 Biliteracy Pathway

(b) Whether the grant application demonstrates school district or public charter school support, commitment and readiness to design K–12 Biliteracy Pathways Grant program.

(3) ODE shall give priority to proposals that meet the minimum criteria and:

(a) Provide a sustainability plan to continue to the program for at least two additional years after the grant period ends.

(b) The extent to which the applicant clearly documents its capacity to implement a model K–12 Biliteracy Pathway, including demonstrated intentions to work in a collaborative way with other grantees.

(4) ODE shall allocate funds for the grant program based on the evaluation of the grant application and the following considerations:

(a) Geographic location of district to insure geographic diversity within the recipients of grant program funs throughout the state;

(b) Districts who have a high level of students who are economically disadvantaged and;

(c) Give preference to districts or schools that have demonstrated success in improving student outcomes, particularly for English Learners.

(5) ODE may also provide funding on a non-competitive basis to previous Dual Language Grant recipients for the purposes of fostering K–12 Biliteracy Pathways at these sites and to support a more complete evaluation of dual language programs and K–12 Biliteracy Pathways across the state.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 326.051
Stat. Implemented: ORS 336.079
Hist.: ODE 14-2015(Temp), f. 9-25-15, cert. ef. 9-28-15 thru 3-15-16; ODE 1-2016, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-16

581-017-0392

Funding

(1) Each grantee who is awarded a competitive K–12 Biliteracy Grant based on the criteria identified in OAR 581-017-0389(1) to (4) may receive up to $120,000 for the biennium.

(2) Each grantee who is awarded a non-competitive K–12 Biliteracy Grant based on the criteria identified in OAR 581-017-0389(5) may receive up to $40,000 for the biennium.

(3) Grantees shall use funds for planning, implementation and evaluation activities associated with the development and/or improvement of their dual language program into a model for statewide replication, and shall engage administrators, teachers, parents and the community in the design, implementation and evaluation of the program with a focus on building school and school district capacity to sustain efforts.

(4) Grantees must be able to expend the funds for allowable purposes specified in the request for proposal within the grant timeline according to acceptable accounting procedures.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 326.051
Stat. Implemented: ORS 336.079
Hist.: ODE 14-2015(Temp), f. 9-25-15, cert. ef. 9-28-15 thru 3-15-16; ODE 1-2016, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-16

581-017-0395

Reporting

The Oregon Department of Education shall provide to grant recipients a template for an interim and final grant report. Grantees are required to submit a final report prior to receiving their final request for funds.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 326.051
Stat. Implemented: ORS 336.079
Hist.: ODE 14-2015(Temp), f. 9-25-15, cert. ef. 9-28-15 thru 3-15-16; ODE 1-2016, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-16

Oregon Farm to School Program Grant

581-017-0432

Definitions

As used in OAR 581-017-0432 to 581-017-0447:

(1) “Commodity commissions or councils” means a commodity commission or council organized under ORS 576.051 to 576.455, the Oregon Beef Council, and the Oregon Wheat Commission.

(2) “Including” means including but not limited to.

(3) “Nonprofit organization” means:

(a) A nonprofit business corporation incorporated under ORS chapter 65;

(b) A foreign nonprofit business corporation authorized to transact business in the state of Oregon; or

(c) An organization that is recognized as tax exempt under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986.

(4)(a) “School district” means an Oregon common school district, joint school district, union high school district, or public charter school.

(b) “School district” does not include an education service district.

Stat. Auth.: OL 2015, ch. 840, sec.13
Stats. Implemented: OL 2015, ch. 840, sec.13
Hist. : ODE 11-2016, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-16

581-017-0435

Purpose

(1) The purpose of the competitive Oregon Farm to School Program grant is to assist entities in paying the costs they incur providing food-based, agriculture-based, or garden-based educational activities in a school district.

(2) A school district, nonprofit organization, or commodity commission or council that receives a competitive Oregon Farm to School Program grant may use the grant for costs directly associated with the educational activities offered to children enrolled in either a public school or public charter school within a school district, including staff time, supplies, equipment, and travel.

Stat. Auth.: OL 2015, ch. 840, sec.13
Stats. Implemented: OL 2015, ch. 840, sec.13
Hist. : ODE 11-2016, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-16

581-017-0438

Eligibility

(1) A school district, nonprofit organization, or commodity commission or council may apply for a competitive Oregon Farm to School Program grant.

(2)(a) A school district, nonprofit organization, or commodity commission or council that applies for a competitive Oregon Farm to School Program grant may partner with one or more organizations to provide food-based, agriculture-based, or garden-based educational activities in a school district. Grant applicants that partner with other organizations to provide educational activities must serve as the fiscal agent for the partnered organizations.

(b) Fiscal agents are responsible for:

(A) Ensuring that their partner organizations comply with the terms and conditions of the competitive Oregon Farm to School Program grant;

(B) Overseeing the delivery of food-based, agriculture-based, or garden-based educational activities to children enrolled in either a public school or public charter school within a school district;

(C) Ensuring that the educational activities offered satisfy the criteria identified in OAR 581-017-0441, the request for proposals, and any related guidance documents produced by the Oregon Department of Education;

(D) Maintaining all records regarding the educational activities offered using, and costs paid for with, grant funds; and

(E) Delivering those records and any completion reports regarding the educational activities funded with, and the expenditure of, grant funds to the Oregon Department of Education.

(3) A school district, nonprofit organization, or commodity commission or council may lose its eligibility to apply for a competitive Oregon Farm to School Program grant during the succeeding biennium, or continue receiving a previously awarded grant, if the school district, nonprofit organization, or commodity commission or council does not:

(a) Comply with the applicable provisions of Oregon Laws 2015, chapter 840, section 13 (Enrolled Senate Bill 501);

(b) Comply with the provisions of OAR 581-017-0432 to 581-017-0447;

(c) Comply with the grant criteria printed in the competitive Oregon Farm to School Program grant request for proposal and any related guidance documents produced by the Oregon Department of Education;

(d) If awarded a competitive Oregon Farm to School Program grant, spend the entire amount of the grant award during the biennium for with the grant was awarded; or

(e) If awarded a competitive Oregon Farm to School Program grant, spend the majority of the grant award on food-based, agriculture-based, or garden-based educational activities for the benefit of children enrolled in either a public school or public charter school within a school district.

Stat. Auth.: OL 2015, ch. 840, sec.13
Stats. Implemented: OL 2015, ch. 840, sec.13
Hist. : ODE 11-2016, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-16

581-017-0441

Application Process and Criteria

(1) The Oregon Department of Education shall establish a request for proposal solicitation and approval process to be conducted each biennium for which competitive Oregon Farm to School Program grant funds are available.

(2) The department shall notify school districts, nonprofit organizations, and commodity commissions or councils of the proposal process and the dates when proposals are due, and make available necessary guidelines and application forms.

(3)(a) School districts, nonprofit organizations, and commodity commissions or councils must submit their grant proposals on the most current form prescribed by the department. The department shall publish the current request for proposals solicitation forms on the department’s website.

(b) If a school district, nonprofit organization, or commodity commission or council that has applied for a competitive Oregon Farm to School Program grant is unable to provide the information required in the request for proposals, then the grant applicant must provide an explanation why the information cannot be provided. Grant applicants may submit additional information that will aid the department in evaluating their grant proposals.

(4) To be considered by the department, the grant proposals submitted by school districts, nonprofit organizations, or commodity commissions or councils must include the following information:

(a) The name of school district in which the educational activities will be offered;

(b) The name of person who will serve as the grant applicant’s primary contact regarding the grant proposal and that person’s contact information, including the primary contact’s email address and telephone number;

(c) The name of the organizations which the grant applicant either has partnered, or is intending to partner, with for the purpose of providing food-based, agriculture-based, or garden-based educational activities for the benefit of children enrolled in either a public school or public charter school within a school district;

(d) The name and contact information of the persons who will serve as the partner organizations’ primary contacts regarding the grant proposal and the educational activities the grant applicant and its partner organizations intend to provide;

(e) A description of the educational activities the grant applicant proposes to offer;

(f) An explanation of how the educational activities the grant applicant proposes to offer with grant funds will address the grant criteria and benefit children enrolled in either a public school or public charter school within a school district;

(g) An estimate of the costs associated with providing the proposed educational activities; and

(h) An analysis of the proposed educational activities and the proposed means of delivering those programs using the Equity Lens adopted under OAR 581-017-0010.

(5) Grant applicants’ proposals will be reviewed for completeness and how well they address the evaluation criteria adopted by the department. Educational activities proposed by grant applicants must:

(a) Be well designed;

(b) Promote healthy food activities;

(c) Have clear educational objectives mapped to applicable state standards;

(d) Involve parents, the local community, nutrition services staff, teachers, or school administrators;

(e) Be connected to a school district’s farm-to-school procurement activities; and

(f) Be culturally relevant to the students being served.

(6) Additional information may be required and additional criteria may be identified in the applicable request for proposal and guidelines published by the department.

(7) Recipients of a competitive Oregon Farm to School Program grant will represent a variety of school sizes and geographic locations, and schools that serve a high percentage of children who qualify for free or reduced price school meals under the United States Department of Agriculture’s National School Lunch Program.

Stat. Auth.: OL 2015, ch. 840, sec.13
Stats. Implemented: OL 2015, ch. 840, sec.13
Hist. : ODE 11-2016, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-16

581-017-0444

Awarding and Using Competitive Oregon Farm to School Program Grants

(1) The Oregon Department of Education shall allocate funds for competitive Oregon Farm to School Program grants.

(2) Competitive Oregon Farm to School Program grants will be awarded to those school districts, nonprofit organizations, or commodity commissions or councils whose grant proposals are judged by the department as best addressing the applicable evaluation criteria.

(3) The department will notify those school districts, nonprofit organizations, or commodity commissions or councils selected for a proposed competitive grant award by either mail or email. Within two weeks of receiving notice, the entity must notify the department whether it accepts the award.

(4) The department will award the first competitive Oregon Farm to School Program grants for the biennium beginning on July 1, 2015, and ending on June 30, 2017. If funding is available, additional competitive grants will be awarded in subsequent biennia.

(5) The amount of each competitive Oregon Farm to School Program grants awarded by the department in any biennia will be at least $2,000.00 and no more than $100,000.00.

(6) A school district, nonprofit organization, or commodity commission or council which is awarded a competitive Oregon Farm to School Program grant may use up to ten percent of the total amount awarded for each of the following:

(a) Administrative costs, including administrative labor and supplies; and

(b) Costs associated with developing and implementing the food-based, agriculture-based, or garden-based educational activities the grant recipient proposes to offer for the benefit of children enrolled in either a public school or public charter school within a school district.

(7) Grant funds awarded for use in one biennium may not be carried over to the following biennium, and will revert to the department at the end of the biennium, unless otherwise determined by the department.

(8) Each competitive Oregon Farm to School Program grant award will be disbursed in two phases.

(a) The payments disbursed in the first phase may not exceed forty percent of the total amount of the grant award and are for planning.

(b) The payments disbursed in the second phase are for implementation.

(9) Grant recipients must deposit the grant funds they receive in a separate account, or assign them a separate account or index number. Grant funds may only be used for the purpose of providing the food-based, agriculture-based, or garden-based educational activities it proposed to offer for the benefit of children enrolled in either a public school or public charter school within a school district.

(10) Grant recipients may not charge indirect costs to their grant award.

Stat. Auth.: OL 2015, ch. 840, sec.13
Stats. Implemented: OL 2015, ch. 840, sec.13
Hist. : ODE 11-2016, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-16

581-017-0447

Performance Measures and Reporting

(1) The Oregon Department of Education shall publish performance measures for recipients of a competitive Oregon Farm to School Program grant in the request for proposals solicitation forms and any related guidance documents produced by the department.

(2) The department shall provide grant recipients with a template for an interim and final grant report. To receive the final disbursement of grant funds, grant recipients must submit both a completed interim and final grant report to the department.

Stat. Auth.: OL 2015, ch. 840, sec.13
Stats. Implemented: OL 2015, ch. 840, sec.13
Hist. : ODE 11-2016, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-16

Oregon CTE Teacher Preparation Program

581-017-0450

Establishment

(1) The Oregon CTE Teacher Preparation Program is established pursuant to sections 1 and 11, chapter 763, Oregon Laws 2015 (Enrolled HB 3072).

(2) The purpose of the Oregon CTE Teacher Preparation Program is to facilitate the recruitment and retention of industry professionals into the education profession as classroom teachers in career and technical education through preparation in a Teacher Standards and Practices approved educator program.

(3) To accomplish the purpose of the CTE Teacher Preparation Program, the Oregon Department of Education shall distribute funds to establish:

(a) A consortia of Teacher Standards and Practices Commission approved teacher education institutions responsible for developing coursework that fulfills licensure requirements established by the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practice Commission for career and technical education teachers; and

(b) A network of providers of professional development for both pre-service and in-service career and technical education teachers.

Stat. Auth.: 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Stat. Implemented: 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Hist. : ODE 12-2016, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-16

581-017-0453

Eligibility

(1) The Department of Education will award grants to support the creation of the CTE Teacher Preparation Program to the following eligible recipients:

(a) Teacher Standards and Practices Commission approved teacher education institutions for the purpose of developing and maintaining coursework for that fulfills licensure requirements established by the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practice Commission for career and technical education teachers; and

(b) Teacher Standards and Practices Commission approved teacher education institutions, community Colleges, education service districts, school districts, public schools, and charter schools, for the purpose of providing professional development for both pre-service and in-service career and technical education teachers.

(2) Eligible recipients may use funds received through the CTE Teacher Preparation Program to contract with private businesses and nonprofits for the purpose of providing experiential learning opportunities for teachers.

Stat. Auth.: 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Stat. Implemented: 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Hist. : ODE 12-2016, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-16

581-017-0456

Criteria

(1) The Department of Education shall establish a request for application solicitation and approval process for the consortia of Teacher Standards and Practices Commission approved teacher education institutions responsible for developing and maintaining coursework.

(2) The Department of Education may only award grants for developing and maintaining coursework to eligible entities that meet the following minimum criteria:

(a) A commitment to participate in the consortia established by the CTE Teacher Preparation Program;

(b) A commitment to work with other members of the consortia to develop a shared curriculum that fulfills licensure requirements established by the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practice Commission for career and technical education teachers;

(c) A demonstrated record of success educating teachers; and

(d) Official program recognition and accreditation through the Teachers Standards and Practices Commission.

(3) The Department of Education shall establish a request for proposal solicitation and approval process for the network of providers of professional development.

(4) The Department of Education may only award grants for professional development to eligible entities that have a demonstrated record of success in, or a clearly established plan for, providing professional development, recruitment, and retention of both pre-service and in-service CTE teachers designed around Oregon Career Learning Areas, the Common Career Technical Core, or the National College and Career Readiness Standards.

(5) In allocating funds, the Department of Education may take into consideration the evaluation of the grant application and geographic location to ensure geographic diversity within the recipients of grant program funds throughout the state.

Stat. Auth.: 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Stat. Implemented: 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Hist. : ODE 12-2016, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-16

581-017-0459

Funding

(1) The Department of Education shall determine for each biennium the portion of the funds available for the consortia of Teacher Standards and Practices Commission approved teacher education institutions responsible for developing and maintaining coursework and for the network of providers of professional development.

(2) CTE Teacher Preparation Program funds received under this section must be separately accounted for and may be used only to provide funding for the purposes described in the application of the grant recipient.

Stat. Auth.: 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Stat. Implemented: 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Hist. : ODE 12-2016, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-16

581-017-0462

Reporting

Recipients of the CTE Teacher Preparation Program grant must report on the grant to the Department of Education. The report must include metrics developed by the Department of Education.

Stat. Auth.: 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Stat. Implemented: 2015 OL Ch. 763, Sec. 1 (Enrolled HB 3072)
Hist. : ODE 12-2016, f. & cert. ef. 2-5-16

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