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TEACHER STANDARDS AND PRACTICES COMMISSION

 

DIVISION 18

STANDARDS FOR EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS:
ADMINISTRATIVE AND PERSONNEL SERVICE PROGRAMS

Administrator Licensure Programs

584-018-0205

Educational Leadership for Administrator Licensure Standards

These standards align with the Educational Leadership Constituents Council (ELCC) standards for Educational Leadership. The knowledge and skill abilities required for each program standard are found within the full document of the standards. These standards are also aligned with the Interstate School Leader Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) recommended standards. Oregon programs must demonstrate integration of principles of cultural competency and equitable practice in each standard through the entire educational leadership and school administration licensure programs.

(1) Visionary Leadership: An educational leader integrates principles of cultural competency and equitable practice and promotes the success of every student by facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by stakeholders. [ISLLC Standard 1] Educational Leaders:

(a) Collaboratively develop and implement a shared vision and mission;

(b) Collect and use data to identify goals, assess organizational effectiveness, and promote organizational learning;

(c) Create and implement plans to achieve goals;

(d) Promote continuous and sustainable improvement; and

(e) Monitor and evaluate progress and revise plans.

(2) Instructional Improvement: An educational leader integrates principles of cultural competency and equitable practice and promotes the success of every student by sustaining a positive school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning and staff professional growth. [ISLLC Standard 2] Educational Leaders:

(a) Nurture and sustain a culture of collaboration, trust, learning and high expectations;

(b) Create a comprehensive, rigorous and coherent curricular program;

(c) Create a personalized and motivating learning environment for students;

(d) Supervise and support instruction;

(e) Develop assessment and accountability systems to monitor student progress;

(f) Develop the instructional and leadership capacity of staff;

(g) Maximize time spent on quality instruction;

(h) Promote the use of the most effective and appropriate technologies to support teaching and learning; and

(i) Monitor and evaluate the impact of instruction.

(3) Effective Management: An educational leader integrates principles of cultural competency and equitable practice and promotes the success of every student by ensuring management of the organization, operation, and resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment. [ISLLC Standard 3] Educational Leaders:

(a) Monitor and evaluate the management and operational systems;

(b) Obtain, allocate, align and efficiently use human, fiscal and technological resources;

(c) Promote and protect the welfare and safety of students and staff;

(d) Develop the capacity for adaptive leadership; and

(e) Ensure teacher and organizational time is focused to support quality instruction and student learning.

(4) Inclusive Practice: An educational leader integrates principles of cultural competency and equitable practice and promotes the success of every student by collaborating with faculty and community members, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources in order to demonstrate and promote ethical standards of democracy, equity, diversity, and excellence, and to promote communication among diverse groups. [ISLLC Standard 4] Educational leaders:

(a) Collect and analyze data pertinent to equitable outcomes;

(b) Understand and integrate the community’s diverse cultural, social and intellectual resources;

(c) Build and sustain positive relationships with families and caregivers; and

(d) Build and sustain productive relationships with community partners.

(5) Ethical Leadership: An educational leader integrates principles of cultural competency and equitable practice and promotes the success of every student by acting with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner. [ISLLC Standard 5] Educational leaders:

(a) Ensure a system of accountability for every student’s academic and social success;

(b) Model principles of self-awareness, reflective practice, transparency and ethical behavior;

(c) Safeguard the values of democracy, equity and diversity;

(d) Evaluate the potential ethical and legal consequences of decision-making; and

(e) Promote social justice and ensure that individual student needs inform all aspects of schooling.

(6) Socio-Political Context: An educational leader integrates principles of cultural competency and equitable practice and promotes the success of every student by understanding, responding to, and influencing the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context. [ISLLC Standard 6] Educational leaders:

(a) Advocate for children, families and caregivers;

(b) Act to influence local, district, state and national decisions affecting student learning; and

(c) Assess, analyze and anticipate emerging trends and initiatives in order to adapt leadership strategies.

(7) Practicum Experience: The practicum provides significant opportunities for candidates to synthesize and apply the knowledge and practice and develop the skills identified in Standards 1-6 through substantial, sustained, standards-based work in real settings, planned and guided cooperatively by the institution and school district personnel for graduate credit.

(a) The practicum will be substantial.

(b) The practicum will be sustained.

(c) The practicum will be standards-based.

(d) The practicum will be planned and guided cooperatively.

(e) The practicum may be for credit.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 – 342.430, 342.455 - 342.495 & 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 3-2012, f. & cert. ef. 3-9-12; TSPC 5-2012, f. & cert. ef. 5-18-12; TSPC 1-2013, f. & cert. ef. 2-14-13; TSPC 3-2013, f. & cert. ef. 8-19-13

Personnel Service Licensure Programs

School Counselors

584-018-0305

Initial School Counselor License: Competency Standards

(1) Candidates who are preparing to work as initial school counselors will demonstrate the professional knowledge, skills, cultural competencies and professional dispositions necessary to promote the academic, career, and personal and social development of all K–12 students.

(2) The Commission may provide state approval to an Initial School Counselor preparation program that prepares candidates for an initial school counselor license only if it includes:

(a) Content that will enable candidates to meet the competency standards for school counselors set forth in this rule. These standards align with the Counsel for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) school counselor standards found at: http://www.cacrep.org.

(b) Field experience as set forth in section (12) of this rule; and

(c) Integration of principles of cultural competency and equitable practice in each competency standard through the entire Initial School Counselor licensure program.

(3) Initial School Counselor programs must provide evidence that student learning has occurred in the following domains of school counselor competency standards:

(4) Domain 1: Foundations:

(a) Knowledge:

(A) Know the history, philosophy, and current trends in school counseling and educational systems;

(B) Understands ethical and legal considerations specifically related to the practice of school counseling;

(C) Knows roles, functions, settings, and professional identity of the school counselor in relation to the roles of other professional and support personnel in the school;

(D) Knows professional organizations, preparation standards, and credentials that are relevant to the practice of school counseling;

(E) Understands current models of school counseling programs and their integral relationship to the total educational program;

(F) Understands the effects of: Atypical growth and development, health and wellness, language; ability level, multicultural issues, and factors of resiliency on student learning and development; and

(G) Understands the operation of the school emergency management plan and the roles and responsibilities of the school counselor during crises, disasters, and other trauma-causing events.

(b) Skills and Practices:

(A) Demonstrates the ability to apply and adhere to ethical and legal standards in school counseling; and

(B) Demonstrates the ability to articulate, model, and advocate for an appropriate school counselor identity and program.

(5) Domain 2: Counseling, Prevention and Intervention:

(a) Knowledge:

(A) Knows the theories and processes of effective counseling and wellness programs for individual students and groups of students;

(B) Knows how to design, implement, manage, and evaluate programs to enhance the academic, career, and personal/social development of students;

(C) Knows strategies for helping students identify strengths and cope with environmental and developmental problems;

(D) Knows how to design, implement, manage, and evaluate transition programs, including school-to-work, postsecondary planning, and college admissions counseling;

(E) Understands group dynamics — including counseling, psycho-educational, task, and peer helping groups — and the facilitation of teams to enable students to overcome barriers and impediments to learning; and

(F) Understands the potential impact of crises, emergencies, and disasters on students, educators, and schools, and knows the skills needed for crisis intervention.

(b) Skills and Practices:

(A) Demonstrates self-awareness, sensitivity to others, and the skills needed to relate to each diverse individual, group, and classroom;

(B) Provides individual and group counseling and classroom guidance to promote the academic, career, and personal and social development of students;

(C) Designs and implements prevention and intervention plans related to the effects of: Atypical growth and development, health and wellness, language, ability level, multicultural issues, and factors of resiliency on student learning and development;

(D) Demonstrates the ability to use procedures for assessing and managing suicide risk; and

(E) Demonstrates the ability to recognize his or her limitations as a school counselor and to seek supervision or refer clients when appropriate.

(6) Domain 3: Diversity and Advocacy:

(a) Knowledge:

(A) Understands the cultural, ethical, economic, legal, and political issues surrounding diversity, equity, and multicultural excellence in terms of student learning;

(B) Identifies community, environmental, and institutional opportunities that enhance, as well as barriers that impede, the academic, career, and personal and social development of students;

(C) Understands the ways in which educational policies, programs, and practices can be developed, adapted, and modified to be culturally congruent with the needs of students and their families; and

(D) Understands multicultural counseling issues, as well as the impact of ability levels, stereotyping, family, socioeconomic status, gender, and sexual identity, and their effects on student achievement.

(b) Skills and Practices:

(A) Demonstrates multicultural competencies in relation to diversity, equity, and opportunity in student learning and development;

(B) Advocates for the learning and academic experiences necessary to promote the academic, career, and personal/social development of students;

(C) Advocates for school policies, programs, and services that enhance a positive school climate and are equitable and responsive to multicultural student populations; and

(D) Engages parents, guardians, and families to promote the academic, career, and personal and social development of students.

(7) Domain 4: Assessment:

(a) Knowledge:

(A) Understands the influence of multiple factors such as: Abuse, violence, eating disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and childhood depression; that may affect the personal, social, and academic functioning of students;

(B) Knows the signs and symptoms of substance abuse in children and adolescents, as well as the signs and symptoms of living in a home where substance abuse occurs; and

(C) Identifies various forms of needs assessments for academic, career, and personal and social development.

(b) Skills and Practices:

(A) Assesses and interprets students’ strengths and needs, recognizing uniqueness in cultures, languages, values, backgrounds, and abilities;

(B) Selects appropriate assessment strategies that can be used to evaluate a student’s academic, career, and personal/social development;

(C) Analyzes assessment information in a manner that produces valid inferences when evaluating the needs of individual students and assessing the effectiveness of educational programs;

(D) Makes appropriate referrals to school and/or community resources; and

(E) Assesses barriers that impede students’ academic, career, and personal and social development.

(8) Domain 5: Research and Evaluation:

(a) Knowledge:

(A) Understands how to critically evaluate research relevant to the practice of school counseling;

(B) Knows models of program evaluation for school counseling programs;

(C) Knows basic strategies for evaluating counseling outcomes in school counseling such as: behavioral observation and program evaluation;

(D) Knows current methods of using data to inform decision making and accountability such as: school improvement plan and school report card; and

(E) Understands the outcome research data and best practices identified in the school counseling research literature.

(b) Skills and Practices:

(A) Applies relevant research findings to inform the practice of school counseling;

(B) Develops measurable outcomes for school counseling programs, activities, interventions, and experiences; and

(C) Analyzes and uses data to enhance school counseling programs.

(9) Domain 6: Academic Development:

(a) Knowledge:

(A) Understands the relationship of the school counseling program to the academic mission of the school;

(B) Understands the concepts, principles, strategies, programs, and practices designed to close the achievement gap, promote student academic success, and prevent students from dropping out of school; and

(C) Understands curriculum design, lesson plan development, classroom management strategies, and differentiated instructional strategies for teaching counseling- and guidance-related material.

(b) Skills and Practices:

(A) Conducts programs designed to enhance student academic development;

(B) Implements strategies and activities to prepare students for a full range of postsecondary options and opportunities; and

(C) Implements differentiated instructional strategies that draw on subject matter and pedagogical content knowledge and skills to promote student achievement.

(10) Domain 7: Collaboration and Consultation:

(a) Knowledge:

(A) Understands the ways in which student development, well-being, and learning are enhanced by family-school-community collaboration;

(B) Knows strategies to promote, develop, and enhance effective teamwork within the school and the larger community;

(C) Knows how to build effective working teams of school staff, parents, and community members to promote the academic, career, and personal and social development of students;

(D) Understands systems theories, models, and processes of consultation in school system settings;

(E) Knows strategies and methods for working with parents, guardians, families, and communities to empower them to act on behalf of their children;

(F) Understands the various peer programming interventions such as: peer meditation, peer mentoring, and peer tutoring; and how to coordinate them; and

(G) Knows school and community collaboration models for crisis or disaster preparedness and response.

(b) Skills and Practices:

(A) Works with parents, guardians, and families to act on behalf of their children to address problems that affect student success in school;

(B) Locates resources in the community that can be used in the school to improve student achievement and success;

(C) Consults with teachers, staff, and community-based organizations to promote student academic, career, and personal/social development;

(D) Uses peer helping strategies in the school counseling program; and

(E) Uses referral procedures with helping agents in the community such as: mental health centers, businesses, and service groups; to secure assistance for students and their families.

(11) Domain 8: Leadership:

(a) Knowledge:

(A) Knows the qualities, principles, skills, and styles of effective leadership;

(B) Knows strategies of leadership designed to enhance the learning environment of schools;

(C) Knows how to design, implement, manage, and evaluate a comprehensive school counseling program;

(D) Understands the important role of the school counselor as a system change agent; and

(E) Understands the school counselor’s role in student assistance programs, school leadership, curriculum, and advisory meetings.

(b) Skills and Practices:

(A) Participates in the design, implementation, management, and evaluation of a comprehensive developmental school counseling program; and

(B) Plans and presents school-counseling-related educational programs for use with parents and teachers such as: parent education programs, materials used in classroom guidance, and advisor and advisee programs for teachers.

(12) Field Experience: The Initial School Counselor Preparation Program shall provide practica in public and/or private school settings for purposes of instruction, assessment of competency, and integration of field work with academic study.

(a) Prospective school counselor candidates who have two years of teaching experience in Oregon schools or out-of-state public or regionally accredited private schools upon completion of an initial school counselor preparation program must:

(A) Complete a practicum consisting of 200 clock hours of supervised counseling in a public school setting; and

(B) Assemble a portfolio or work sample to demonstrate the candidate’s ability to meet the expectations of the public school's counseling program.

(b) Prospective school counselor candidates who do not have two years of teaching experience in any public or regionally accredited private schools upon completion of an initial school counselor preparation program:

(A) Complete a supervised practicum consisting of a minimum of 200 clock hours in a regular classroom in a public school, to include a minimum of 75 clock hours of full responsibility for directing learning;

(B) Complete a minimum of 600 clock hours of supervised counseling experience in a public school;

(C) Assemble and analyze one work sample to illustrate his/her ability to foster student learning; and

(D) Assemble a portfolio or work sample to demonstrate the candidate’s ability to meet the expectations of the public school's counseling program. The Initial School Counselor Preparation Program shall:

(i) Determine jointly with the practicum site supervising counselor that the candidate has demonstrated the skills and competencies required for licensure in the practicum.

(ii) Establish and implement policies on supervision of practicum candidates that state the responsibilities of unit supervisors and practicum site supervisors and administrators, including the frequency of observations and conferences with the candidates.

(iii) Make a minimum of four supportive/evaluative visits during the practicum. At least twice during the practicum, the unit’s supervisors meets with the candidate and the practicum site supervisor in joint conferences to discuss performance and evaluation.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 - 342.430, 342.455 - 342.495 & 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 4-2012, f. & cert. ef. 5-18-12; TSPC 1-2013, f. & cert. ef. 2-14-13; TSPC 5-2014, f. & cert. ef. 8-5-14: TSPC 1-2015, f. & cert. ef. 2-10-15

584-018-0310

Knowledge, Skills, Abilities and Cultural Competencies for Continuing School Counselor License

(1) Candidates who complete the Continuing School Counselor program are accomplished school counselors and educational leaders who have the knowledge, skill, ability, and cultural competence to document and contribute to the professional literature or program development within their district. Candidates demonstrate an understanding of and ability to apply emerging research on counseling, learning, and school improvement to increase comprehensive counseling program effectiveness.

(2) Candidates who complete the Continuing School Counselor program are accomplished school counselors and educational leaders who have the knowledge, skill, ability, and cultural competence to implement research-based educational practices that assess perception, process, and results data emerging from programs. Candidates:

(a) Use analysis directed toward developing programs to improve students' ability to live, learn, work, and contribute to their communities; and

(b) Use practices that are sensitive to individual differences, and diverse cultural, ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds.

(3) Candidates who complete the Continuing School Counselor program are accomplished school counselors and educational leaders who have the knowledge, skill, ability, and cultural competence to consult and collaborate with colleagues, staff, parents, and the public to enhance the student's performance, as well as advocate for changes in the program that benefit all students.

(4) Candidates who complete the Continuing School Counselor program are accomplished school counselors and educational leaders who have the knowledge, skill, ability, and cultural competence to demonstrate effective leadership in program development and communication with diverse and special interest organizations. Candidates seek and secure appropriate funding for program expansion.

(5) Candidates who complete the Continuing School Counselor program are accomplished school counselors and educational leaders who have the knowledge, skill, ability, and cultural competence to demonstrate an advanced understanding of ethics and laws applicable to professional school counselors.

(6) Candidates who complete the Continuing School Counselor program are accomplished school counselors and educational leaders who have the knowledge, skill, ability, and cultural competence to demonstrate professional training and development as a supervisor of school counselors and school counselors in training.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120–342.430, 342.455-342.495, 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 4-2012, f. & cert. ef. 5-18-12

584-018-0315

Authorization Levels for School Counselors

The unit assures that candidates for Initial School Counselor License and Continuing School Counselor License demonstrate knowledge, skills and competencies for a K–12 authorization level by:

(1) Completing preparation in developmental psychology and methods appropriate for early childhood through high school;

(2) Articulating and applying a philosophy of education appropriate for early childhood through high school; and

(3) Completing supervised field or clinical experience in early childhood through high school.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 - 342.430, 342.455 - 342.495 & 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 3-2012, f. & cert. ef. 3-9-12; TSPC 9-2014, f. & cert. ef. 11-14-14

School Psychologists

584-018-0405

Knowledge, Skills, Abilities and Professional Dispositions for Initial School Psychologist Licensure

(1) The following requirements must be met to be eligible for an Initial School Psychologist License.

(2) Data-Based Decision-Making and Accountability: Candidates have knowledge and use models and methods as part of a systematic process to collect data and other information, translate assessment results into empirically-based decisions about service delivery, and evaluate the outcomes of services.

(3) Consultation and Collaboration: Candidates have knowledge of behavioral, mental health, collaborative, and/or other consultation models and methods and of their application to particular situations. Candidates collaborate effectively with parents, school and outside personnel in planning and decision-making processes at the individual, group, and system levels.

(4) Effective Instruction and Development of Cognitive/Academic Skills: Candidates have knowledge of human learning processes, and in collaboration with others, develop appropriate cognitive and academic goals for students with different abilities, disabilities, strengths, and needs; implement interventions to achieve those goals; and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions (e.g. instructional interventions and consultation).

(5) Socialization and Development of Life Skills: Candidates have knowledge of human developmental processes, and in collaboration with others, develop appropriate behavioral, affective, adaptive, and social goals for students of varying abilities, disabilities, strengths, and needs; implement interventions to achieve those goals; and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions (e.g. consultation, behavioral assessment/intervention, and counseling).

(6) Student Diversity in Development and Learning: Candidates have knowledge of individual differences, abilities, and disabilities and of the potential influence of biological, social, cultural, ethnic, experiential, socioeconomic, sexual orientation, gender-related, and linguistic factors in development and learning. Candidates demonstrate the sensitivity and skills needed to work with individuals of diverse characteristics and to implement strategies selected and/or adapted based on individual characteristics, strengths, and needs.

(7) School and Systems Organization, Policy Development, and Climate: Candidates have knowledge of general education, special education, and other educational and related services. Candidates understand schools and other settings as systems. Candidates work with individuals and groups to facilitate policies and practices that create and maintain safe, supportive, and effective learning environments for children and others.

(8) Prevention, Crisis Intervention, and Mental Health: Candidates have knowledge of human development and psychopathology and of associated biological, cultural, and social influences on human behavior. Candidates provide or contribute to prevention and intervention programs that promote the mental health and physical well-being of students. Candidates have knowledge of crisis intervention and collaborate with school personnel, parents, and the community in the aftermath of crises.

(9) Home/School/Community Collaboration: Candidates have knowledge of family systems, including family strengths and influences on student development, learning, and behavior, and of methods to involve families in education and service delivery. Candidates work effectively with families, educators, and others in the community to promote and provide comprehensive services to children and families.

(10) Research and Program Evaluation: Candidates have knowledge of research, statistics, and evaluation methods. Candidates evaluate research, translate research into practice, and understand research design and statistics in sufficient depth to plan and conduct interventions (individual and/or program) for improvement of services.

(11) School Psychology Practice and Development: Candidates have knowledge of the history and foundations of their profession; of various service models and methods; of public policy development applicable to services to children and families; and of ethical, professional, and legal standards. Candidates practice in ways that are consistent with applicable standards.

(12) Information Technology: Candidates have knowledge of information sources and technology relevant to their work. Candidate's access, evaluates, and utilizes information sources and technology in ways that safeguard or enhance the quality of services.

(13) The unit assures that candidates for the Initial School Psychologist License demonstrate knowledge, skills and competencies by:

(a) Completing preparation in psychological foundations and methods appropriate for prekindergarten through grade 12 (pre K-12) grade authorization levels; and

(b) Documenting knowledge by passing the Commission-approved test for the Initial School Psychologist License.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 – 342.430; 342.455-342.495; 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 3-2012, f. & cert. ef. 3-9-12

584-018-0410

Knowledge, Skills, Abilities and Professional Dispositions for Continuing School Psychologist Licensure

The unit provides an approved program through which the candidates document the advanced competencies required for a Continuing License for School Psychology.

(1) Candidates document an understanding of and ability to apply emerging research on teaching, learning, and school improvement to increase district effectiveness.

(2) Candidates implement research-based educational practices that ensure student achievement and are sensitive to individual differences, diverse cultures, and ethnic backgrounds.

(3) Candidates exhibit collaboration with colleagues, staff, parents, and the public to enhance the student's performance.

(4) Candidates demonstrate effective leadership in communication with diverse and special interest organizations.

(5) Candidates develop productive school, board and community relations.

(6) Candidates demonstrate an advanced understanding of laws applicable to school psychologists.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 – 342.430; 342.455-342.495; 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 3-2012, f. & cert. ef. 3-9-12

584-018-0415

Authorization Levels for School Psychologists

The unit assures that candidates for Initial School Social Worker License and Continuing School Social Worker License demonstrate knowledge, skills and competencies for a pre-K–12 authorization level by:

(1) Completing preparation in developmental psychology and methods appropriate for early childhood through high school;

(2) Articulating and applying a philosophy of education appropriate for early childhood through high school;

(3) Completing supervised field or clinical experiences in early childhood through high school; and

(4) Documenting knowledge by submitting passing scores on the Commission-approved licensure tests.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 - 342.430, 342.455 - 342.495, 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 3-2012, f. & cert. ef. 3-9-12

School Social Workers

584-018-0505

Knowledge, Skills, Abilities and Professional Dispositions for Initial School Social Worker Licensure

(1) School Social Worker Program: Candidates who complete the program are school social workers and interdisciplinary leaders who have the knowledge, skill, ability, and cultural competence to develop and deliver school social worker services that demonstrate continuous improvement, and advance the mission of the school. Candidates:

(a) Know the history, philosophy, and current trends in school social work and educational programs;

(b) Work collaboratively to mobilize the resources of local education agencies and communities to meet the needs of students and families, and provide consultation to local education agency personnel, school board members, and community representatives to promote understanding and effective utilization of school social work services;

(c) Organize their time, energies, and workloads to fulfill their responsibilities and complete assignments of their position, with due consideration of the priorities among their various responsibilities; and

(d) Align the school social work program with the academic and student services program in the school.

(2) A school social worker shall demonstrate commitment to the values and ethics of the social work profession and shall use National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics as a guide to ethical decision making.

(3) School social workers shall ensure that students and their families are provided services within the context of multicultural understanding and competence that enhance families' support of students' learning experiences.

(4) School social work services shall be extended to students in ways that build students' individual strengths and offer students maximum opportunity to participate in the planning and direction of their own learning experience.

(5) School social workers shall help empower students and their families to gain access to and effectively use formal and informal community resources.

(6) School social workers shall maintain adequate safeguards for the privacy and confidentiality of information.

(7) School social workers shall advocate for students and their families in a variety of situations.

(8) School social workers shall conduct assessments of student needs that are individualized and provide information that is directly useful for designing interventions that address behaviors of concern.

(9) School social workers shall possess knowledge and understanding basic to the social work profession.

(10) School social workers shall understand the backgrounds and broad range of experiences that shape students' approaches to learning.

(11). School social workers shall possess knowledge and understanding of the organization and structure of the local education agency (school district).

(12). School social workers shall possess knowledge and understanding of the reciprocal influences of home, school, and community.

(13) School social workers shall possess skills in systematic assessment and investigation.

(14) School social workers shall understand the relationship between practice and policies affecting students.

(15) School social workers shall be able to select and apply empirically validated or promising prevention and intervention methods to enhance students' educational experiences.

(16) School social workers shall be able to promote collaboration among community health and mental health services providers and facilitate student access to these services.

(17) Informational Resources and Technology: Candidates who complete the program are school social workers who have the knowledge, ability, skill, and cultural competence to be skilled in the selection and use of informational resources and technology and use them to facilitate the delivery of a comprehensive school social work services that meets student needs.

(18) Reflective Practice: Candidates who complete the program are school social workers who have the knowledge, ability, skill, and cultural competence to integrate their knowledge, skills, and life experience to respond effectively to new or unexpected critical events and situations.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 – 342.430; 342.455-342.495; 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 3-2012, f. & cert. ef. 3-9-12

584-018-0510

Knowledge, Skills, Abilities, and Professional Dispositions for Continuing School Social Worker Licensure

(1) Candidates who complete the program are accomplished school social workers and educational leaders who have the knowledge, skill, ability, and cultural competence to document and contribute to the professional literature or program development within their district.

(2) School social workers shall organize their time, energies, and workloads to fulfill their responsibilities and complete assignments of their position, with due consideration of the priorities among their various responsibilities.

(3) School social workers shall provide consultation to local education agency personnel, school board members, and community representatives to promote understanding and effective utilization of school social work services.

(4) As leaders and members of interdisciplinary teams and coalitions, school social workers shall work collaboratively to mobilize the resources of local education agencies and communities to meet the needs of students and families.

(5) School social workers shall develop and provide training and educational programs for parents, teacher, other local education agency personnel, and staff of community agencies that address the goals and mission of the educational institution.

(6) School social workers shall maintain accurate data that are relevant to planning, management, and evaluation of school social work services.

(7) School social workers shall incorporate assessments in developing and implementing intervention and evaluation plans that enhance students' abilities to benefit from educational experiences.

(8) School social workers, as systems change agents, shall identify areas of need that are not being addressed by the local education agency and community and shall work to create services that address these needs.

(9) School social workers shall be trained in and use mediation and conflict resolution strategies to promote students' resolution of their nonproductive encounters in the school and community and to promote productive relationships.

(10) School social workers shall meet the provisions for practice set by NASW.

(11) School social workers shall be able to evaluate their practice and disseminate the findings to consumers, the local education agency, the community, and the profession.

(12) School social workers shall possess skills in developing coalitions at the local, state, and national levels that promote student success.

(13) School social workers shall assume responsibility for their own continued professional development in accordance with the NASW Standards for Continuing Professional Education and state requirements.

(14) School social workers shall contribute to the development of the profession by educating and supervising school social work interns.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 – 342.430; 342.455-342.495; 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 3-2012, f. & cert. ef. 3-9-12

584-018-0515

Authorization Levels for School Social Workers

The unit assures that candidates for Initial School Social Worker License and Continuing School Social Worker License demonstrate knowledge, skills and competencies for a K–12 authorization level by:

(1) Completing preparation in developmental psychology and methods appropriate for early childhood through high school;

(2) Articulating and applying a philosophy of education appropriate for early childhood through high school;

(3) Completing supervised field or clinical experiences in early childhood through high school; and

(4) Documenting knowledge by submitting passing scores on the Commission-approved licensure tests.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 – 342.430; 342.455-342.495; 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 3-2012, f. & cert. ef. 3-9-12

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