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The Oregon Administrative Rules contain OARs filed through October 15, 2014
 
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TEACHER STANDARDS AND PRACTICES COMMISSION

 

DIVISION 65

ENDORSEMENTS FOR INITIAL AND CONTINUING TEACHING LICENSES 

584-065-0001

Purpose of Endorsements for Initial and Continuing Teacher Licenses

(1) These rules establish endorsement requirements for Initial and Continuing Teacher Licenses. The use of this rule includes, but is not limited to, the following:

(a) Advising Oregon Teacher Education Institutions of academic requirements for endorsements under divisions 60, 70 and 80;

(b) Assessing the preparation of out-of-state applicants who make application for Oregon licensure; and

(c) Guiding in the selection and use of licensure tests in the respective endorsements.

(2) Teachers holding Basic or Standard Licenses are endorsed under requirements stated in divisions 38 and 40.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 - 342.143, 342.153, RS 342.165, & 342.223 - 342.232
Hist.: TSPC 5-1998, f. 6-5-98, cert. ef. 1-15-99

584-065-0035 [Renumbered to 584-018-0160]

584-065-0050 [Renumbered to 584-018-0155]

584-065-0060

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities for Physical Education Endorsement

(1) In addition to passing the required Commission-approved subject-matter, examinations for physical education and completing the required practicum experience, the following requirements must be met to add a physical education endorsement onto any Initial or Continuing Teaching License. The requirements to add a physical education endorsement onto a Basic or Standard Teaching License can be found at: OAR 584-038-0230 and 584-040-0210.

(2) Demonstrated Content Knowledge. Candidates demonstrate an understanding of physical education content, disciplinary concepts, and tools of inquiry related to the development of a physically educated person. Candidates must:

(a) Identify critical elements of motor skill performance, and combine motor skills into appropriate sequences for the purpose of improving learning;

(b) Demonstrate competent motor skill performance in a variety of physical activities;

(c) Describe performance concepts and strategies related to a skillful movement and physical activity such as: fitness principles, game tactics, skill improvement principles;

(d) Describe and apply: anatomical, physiological and biomechanical bioscience and psychological concepts to skillful movement, physical activity and fitness;

(e) Understand and debate current physical education and activity issues and laws based on historical, philosophical and sociological concepts; and

(f) Demonstrate knowledge of national and state content standards and local programs goals.

(3) Demonstrated Knowledge of Growth and Development. Candidates demonstrate an understanding of how individuals learn and develop, and can provide opportunities that support their physical, cognitive, social and emotional development. Candidates must:

(a) Monitor individual and group performance in order to design safe instruction that meets student development needs in the physical, cognitive and social and emotional domains;

(b) Understand the biological, psychological, sociological, experiential and environmental factors such as: neurological development, physique, gender and socio-economic status that impact developmental readiness to learn and demonstrate the ability to refine movement skills accordingly; and

(c) Identify, select and implement appropriate learning and best practices opportunities based on understanding the student, the learning environment and the task.

(4) Demonstrated Ability to Differentiate Instruction. Candidates demonstrate competencies in differentiated instruction for diverse learners by demonstrating an understanding of how individuals differ in their approaches to learning and create appropriate instruction opportunities adapted to individual differences. Candidates must:

(a) Identify, select, and implement appropriate instruction that is sensitive to students' strengths and weaknesses, multiple needs, learning styles, and prior experiences including but not limited to cultural, ethnic, personal, family and community influences; and

(b) Use appropriate services and resources in the delivery of differentiated instruction to ensure success for all students.

(5) Demonstrated Competency in Classroom Management and Individual and Group Motivation. Candidate demonstrates ability to understand individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning and self-motivation. Candidates must:

(a) Use managerial routines that create smoothly functioning learning experiences and environments;

(b) Organize, allocate, and manage resources such as students, time, space, equipment, activities and teacher attention;

(c) Use a variety of developmentally appropriate practices to motivate students to participate in physical activity inside and outside the school;

(d) Use strategies to help students demonstrate responsible personal and social behaviors such as mutual respect, support for others, safety and cooperation that promote positive relationships and a productive learning environment; and

(e) Develop effective behavior management plans when appropriate.

(6) Demonstrate Competency in Communication. Candidates demonstrate skill and knowledge in the use of effective verbal, nonverbal and media communication techniques to foster inquiry, collaboration and engagement in physical activity settings. Candidates must:

(a) Describe and demonstrate effective communication skills, such as: use of language, clarity, conciseness, pacing, giving and receiving, feedback, age appropriate language and non-verbal communication;

(b) Communicate managerial and instructional information in a variety of ways such as bulletin boards, music, task cards, posters, Internet and video;

(c) Communicate in ways that demonstrate sensitivity and consideration of ethnic, cultural, socio-economic, ability and gender differences; and

(d) Describe and implement strategies to enhance communication and collaboration among students in physical activity settings.

(7) Demonstrate Competency in Planning and Instruction. The candidate demonstrates skill in planning and implements a variety of developmentally appropriate instructional strategies to develop physically educated individuals. Candidates must:

(a) Identify, develop and implement appropriate program and instructional goals;

(b) Develop long and short-term plans that are linked to both programs, instructional goals and student needs;

(c) Select and implement instructional strategies, based on selected content, student needs and safety issues, to facilitate learning in the physical activity setting;

(d) Design and implement learning experiences that are safe, appropriate, relevant and based on principles of effective instruction;

(e) Apply disciplinary and pedagogical knowledge in developing and implementing effective learning environments and experiences;

(f) Provide learning experiences that allow students to integrate knowledge and skills from multiple subject areas;

(g) Select and implement appropriate, comprehensive, accurate, useful and safe teaching resources and curriculum materials;

(h) Use effective demonstrations and explanations to link physical activity concepts to appropriate learning experiences;

(i) Develop and use appropriate instructional cues and prompts to facilitate competent motor skills performance; and

(j) Develop a repertoire of direct and indirect instructional formats to facilitate student learning such as ask questions, pose scenarios, promote problem-solving and critical thinking; facilitate factual recall and promote literacy.

(8) Demonstrate Competencies in Learner Assessment. The candidate demonstrates an understanding and use of formal and informal assessment strategies to foster physical, cognitive, social and emotional development of learners in physical activity. Candidates must:

(a) Identify key component of various types of assessment, describe their appropriate and inappropriate use and address issues of validity, reliability and adverse impact;

(b) Use a variety of appropriate authentic and traditional assessment techniques, including both self and peer assessments, to assess student understanding and performance, provide feedback and communicate student progress for both formative and summative purposes; and

(c) Interpret and use learning and performance data to make informed curricular and instructional decisions.

(9) Demonstrate Competency in the Ability to Reflect and Make Appropriate Adjustments in Teaching Quality. Candidates demonstrate the ability to reflect and evaluate the effects of her or his actions on others. Candidates must:

(a) Use a reflective cycle involving description of teaching, justification of teaching performance, critique of the teaching performance, the setting of teaching goals and implementation of change;

(b) Use available resources such as colleagues, literature and professional associations to develop as a reflective physical educator; and

(c) Construct a plan for continued professional growth based on the assessment of personal teaching performance.

(10) Demonstrate Competency in Technology. Candidates use information technology to enhance learning and to enhance personal and professional productivity. Candidates must:

(a) Demonstrate knowledge of current technologies and their application in physical education;

(b) Design, develop and implement student learning activities that integrate information technology; and

(c) Use technologies to communicate, network, locate resources and enhance continuing professional development.

(11) Demonstrate Competency to Foster Collaboration. Candidates will foster relationships with colleagues, parents and guardians and community agencies to support learners' growth and well-being. Candidates will:

(a) Identify strategies to become an advocate in the school and community to promote a variety of physical activity opportunities;

(b) Actively participate in the local, state and national professional physical education community and within the broader education field;

(c) Identify and actively seek community resources to enhance physical activity opportunities; and

(d) Pursue productive relationships with parents, guardians and school colleagues to support student growth and well-being.

(12) Candidates for physical education endorsement must be authorized at one paired authorization level as defined in OAR 584-060-0071 in any one of the following combinations below. Candidates completing a practica experience at either early childhood or elementary and at either middle or high school levels shall qualify for authorization to teach preprimary through grade 12. Paired authorizations may be:

(a) Early Childhood and Elementary;

(b) Elementary and Middle Level; or

(c) Middle Level and High School.

(13) This endorsement is valid to teach:

(a) Games and sports skills;

(b) Gymnastics;

(c) Movement;

(d) Personal and Social Development;

(e) Physical Fitness and Body Development;

(f) Rhythms;

(g) Adaptive motor skills; and

(h) Athletic training.

(14) This endorsement is required for teaching any subject in subsection (13) above:

(a) More than 51% on a Basic or Standard Teaching License with an elementary endorsement; or

(b) More than 10 hours per week on:

(A) Any Basic or Standard Teaching License with other than an elementary endorsement; or

(B) An Initial or Continuing Teaching License at any grade authorization level.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 - 342.143, 342.153, 342.165 & 342.173
Hist.: TSPC 2-2005, f. & cert. ef. 4-15-05; TSPC 5-2009, f. & cert. ef. 10-5-09

584-065-0070

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities for Health Education Endorsement

(1) In addition to passing the required Commission-approved subject-matter, examinations for health education and completing the required practicum experience, the following requirements must be met to add a health education endorsement onto any Initial or Continuing Teaching License. The requirements to add a health education endorsement onto a Basic or Standard Teaching License can be found at: OAR 584-038-0110 and 584-040-0100.

(2) Candidates Assess Individual and Community Needs for Health Education. Candidates will:

(a) Obtain health-related data about social and cultural environments, growth and development factors, needs, and interests of students;

(b) Distinguish between behaviors that foster and those that hinder well-being; and

(c) Candidates determine health education needs based on observed and obtained data.

(3) Candidates Plan Effective Health Education Programs. Candidates will:

(a) Recruit school and community representatives to support and assist in program planning;

(b) Develop a logical scope and sequence plan for a health education program;

(c) Formulate appropriate and measurable learner objectives; and

(d) Design educational strategies consistent with specified learner objectives.

(4) Candidates Implement Health Education Programs. Candidates will:

(a) Analyze factors affecting the successful implementation of health education and Coordinated School Health Programs (CSHPs);

(b) Select resources and media best suited to implement program plans for diverse learners;

(c) Exhibit competence in carrying out planned programs; and

(d) Monitor educational programs, adjusting objectives and instructional strategies as necessary.

(5) Candidates Evaluate the Effectiveness of Coordinated School Health Programs. Candidates will:

(a) Develop plans to assess student achievement of program objectives;

(b) Carry out evaluation plans;

(c) Interpret results of program evaluation; and

(d) Infer implications of evaluation findings for future program planning.

(6) Candidates Coordinate Provision of Health Education Programs and Services. Candidates will:

(a) Develop a plan for coordinating health education with other components of a school health program;

(b) Demonstrate the dispositions and skills to facilitate cooperation among health educators, other teachers, and appropriate school staff;

(c) Candidates formulate practical modes of collaboration among health educators in all settings and other school and community health professionals; and

(d) Candidates organize professional development programs for teachers, other school personnel, community members, and other interested individuals.

(7) Candidates Act as a Resource Person in Health Education. Candidates will:

(a) Utilize computerized health information retrieval systems effectively;

(b) Establish effective consultative relationships with those requesting assistance in solving health-related problems;

(c) Interpret and respond to requests for health information; and

(d) Select effective educational resource materials for dissemination.

(8) Candidates Communicate Health and Health Education Needs, Concerns, and Resources. Candidates will:

(a) Interpret concepts, purposes, and theories of health education;

(b) Predict the impact of societal value systems on health education programs;

(c) Select a variety of communication methods and techniques in providing health information; and

(d) Foster communication between health care providers and consumers.

(9) Candidates Apply Appropriate Research Principles and Methods in Health Education. Candidates will:

(a) Conduct thorough reviews of health-related literature;

(b) Use appropriate qualitative and quantitative research methods; and

(c) Apply research to health education practices.

(10) Candidates Have the Skills to Administer Health Education Programs. Candidates will:

(a) Develop and manage health education program fiscal resources;

(b) Develop and manage human resources; and

(c) Exercise organizational leadership.

(11) Candidates Advance the Profession of Health Education. Candidates will:

(a) Provide a critical analysis of current and future needs in health education;

(b) Assume responsibility for advancing the profession;

(c) Apply ethical principles as they relate to the practice of health education.

(12) Candidates Have the Ability to Differentiate Instruction. Candidates will:

(a) Demonstrate competencies in delivering differentiated instructional strategies that promote equitable learning opportunities and success for all students regardless of native language, socioeconomic background, ethnicity, gender, disability or other individual characteristics;

(b) Identify, select, and implement appropriate instruction that is sensitive to students' strengths and weaknesses, multiple needs, learning styles, and prior experiences including but not limited to cultural, ethnic, personal, family and community influences; and

(c) Use appropriate services and resources in the delivery of differentiated instruction.

(13) This endorsement is valid to teach:

(a) Health Education;

(b) Advanced Health;

(c) Food and Fitness;

(d) Drug Education;

(e) Health Promotion;

(f) Health and Wellness Education;

(g) Individual Health Projects;

(h) Chemical and Substance Abuse Education;

(i) Family Living; and

(j) Other health-related courses or activities.

(14) This endorsement is required for teaching any subject in subsection (12) above for more than ten hours per week, or if conditionally assigned in more than one subject (See, OAR 584-036-0081) on:

(a) Any Basic or Standard Teaching License with other than an elementary endorsement in grades 5 through 12; and

(b) Any Initial or Continuing Teaching License with a high school authorization.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 -342.143, 342.153, 342.165, 342.223 - 342.232
Hist.: TSPC 2-2005, f. & cert. ef. 4-15-05; TSPC 2-2008, f. & cert. ef. 4-15-08

584-065-0080

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities for Basic Math Endorsement

(1) In addition to passing the required Commission-approved subject-matter, examinations for basic math and completing the required practicum experience, the following requirements must be met to add a basic math endorsement onto any Initial or Continuing Teaching License. The requirements to add a basic math endorsement onto a Basic or Standard Teaching License can be found at OAR 584-038-0180.

(2) Demonstrated Content Knowledge:

(a) For knowledge of numbers, operations, candidates will:

(A) Demonstrate conceptual understanding of complex numbers and real numbers particularly rational numbers and integers; ways of representing numbers; relationships among numbers and number systems; and the meaning of operations; and

(B) Be computationally proficient and choose the appropriate computational format such as exact or approximate; and method, such as mental, paper and pencil, or electronic.

(b) For knowledge of algebra and functions, candidates will:

(A) Understand the various roles of algebra and demonstrate conceptual understanding of variables and functions including linear, quadratic and exponential functions and their inverses;

(B) Use a variety of representations including verbal, pictorial, tabular, symbolic and graphic to emphasize relationships among quantities; and

(C) Demonstrate conceptual understanding of and skill in appropriate use of symbols.

(c) For knowledge of geometry, candidates will:

(A) Use spatial visualization and geometric modeling and constructions to explore and analyze geometric shapes, structures, and their properties;

(B) Make conjectures about two- and three-dimensional shapes and offer justifications for conjectures; and

(C) Apply coordinates geometry and transformations including the use of congruence, similarity, and symmetry to analyze mathematical situations.

(d) For knowledge of measurement, candidates will:

(A) Understand measurement processes including estimation, accuracy and choice of measurement tool for both U.S. customary and metric systems; and

(B) Understand and use direct and indirect measurement techniques and formulas for both two- and three-dimensional figures.

(e) For knowledge of data analysis and probability and statistic, candidates will:

(A) Design investigations, collect data, use a variety of ways to display the data and critically interpret data representations;

(B) Make predictions and draw conclusions involving uncertainty by applying basic concepts of probability; and

(C) Use appropriate statistical methods to analyze and describe shape, spread, and center data; then they use that information to make inferences.

(f) For knowledge of calculus, candidates will:

(A) Demonstrate a conceptual understanding of limits, particularly in relation to understanding series, repetitive processes and non-terminating decimals; and

(B) Demonstrate a conceptual understanding of rate of change and the relationship to minimums, maximums and area of a region.

(3) Demonstrated Competency in Following Process Standards.

(a) For competency in problem solving, candidates will engage in mathematical inquiry through understanding a problem, exploring, conjecturing, experimenting and justifying.

(b) For competency in reasoning and proof, candidates will:

(A) Select and use various types of reasoning including categorizing based on numeric and geometric properties, and using Venn diagrams, set notation and operations; and

(B) Develop and evaluate mathematical arguments such as informal proofs, and the foundations on which arguments are built.

(c) For competency in communication, candidates will:

(A) Organize and consolidate their mathematical thinking through communication;

(B) Communicate coherently and use the language of mathematics, such as symbols and terminology, to express ideas precisely; and

(C) Analyze the mathematical thinking of others.

(d) For competency in representation, candidates will:

(A) Use multiple forms of representation including concrete models, pictures, diagrams, tables and graphs; and

(B) Use invented and conventional terms and symbols to communicate reasoning and solve problems.

(e) For competency in connections, candidates will:

(A) Understand how mathematical ideas interconnect and build on one another to produce a coherent whole; and

(B) Recognize and apply mathematics in contexts outside of mathematics.

(4) Demonstrated knowledge and skill in mathematics pedagogy:

(a) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in the principles equity candidates will demonstrate high expectations and strong support for all students to learn mathematics.

(b) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in developing curriculum, candidates will:

(A) Map curriculum that is coherent, focused on important mathematics and carefully sequenced;

(B) Be familiar with curriculum both preceding and following the middle level; and

(C) Be able to discern the quality of learning opportunities for students when given a particular task, activity, educational software, etc., and are able to make adaptations to assure quality.

(c) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in developing quality learning environment candidates will foster a classroom environment conducive to mathematical learning through:

(A) Providing and structuring the time necessary to explore sound mathematics and grapple with significant ideas and problems;

(B) Using the physical space and materials in ways that facilitate students' learning of mathematics;

(C) Providing a context that encourages the development of mathematical skill and proficiency; and

(D) Respecting and valuing students' ideas, ways of thinking and mathematical dispositions.

(d) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in teaching, candidates will:

(A) Understand what mathematics students know and need to learn and then challenge and support them to learn it well; and

(B) Orchestrate discourse by:

(i) Posing questions and tasks that elicit, engage and challenge each student's thinking;

(ii) Listening carefully to students' ideas; asking students to clarify and justify their ideas orally and in writing;

(iii) Deciding what to pursue in depth from among the ideas that students bring up during a discussion;

(iv) Deciding when and how to attach mathematical notation and language to students' ideas;

(v) Deciding when to provide information, when to clarify an issue, when to model, when to lead, and when to let a student struggle with a difficulty; and

(vi) Monitoring students' participation in discussions and deciding when and how to encourage each student to participate.

(e) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in learning, candidates will:

(A) Know that students must learn mathematics with understanding, actively building new knowledge from experience and prior knowledge; and

(B) Have the ability to recognize and move students from concrete to abstract levels of understanding.

(f) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in assessment, candidates will:

(A) Use a variety of formal and informal, formative and summative assessment techniques to support the learning of important mathematics;

(B) Understand how, why, and when to use various assessment techniques and tools; as well as how these tools inform their understanding about student thinking and understanding; and

(C) Plan instruction based upon the information obtained through classroom and external assessments of each student's developmental level.

(g) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in technology, candidates will:

(A) Understand that technology is an integral part of teaching and learning mathematics both influencing what is taught and enhancing how it is learned.

(B) Demonstrate effective and appropriate use of technology.

(h) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in mathematic historical development candidates will demonstrate knowledge of historical and cultural influences in mathematics including contributions of underrepresented groups.

(i) For demonstrated ability to differentiate instruction, candidates will demonstrate competencies in delivering differentiated instructional strategies that promote equitable learning opportunities and success for all students regardless of native language, socioeconomic background, ethnicity, gender, disability or other individual characteristics. Candidates will:

(A) Identify, select, and implement appropriate instruction that is sensitive to students' strengths and weaknesses, multiple needs, learning styles, and prior experiences including but not limited to cultural, ethnic, personal, family and community influences; and

(B) Use appropriate services and resources in the delivery of differentiated instruction.

(5) This endorsement is valid to teach any course at or below Algebra I including:

(a) Remedial Math;

(b) Mathematics;

(c) Basic Math;

(d) Math Concepts (grades 6-8);

(e) Pre-Algebra;

(f) Introductory Algebra;

(g) Basic Algebra;

(h) Algebra I;

(i) Competency Mathematics;

(j) Consumer Mathematics;

(k) General Math I & II;

(l) Mathematics Fundamentals;

(m) Math Lab;

(n) Middle Mathematics Skills;

(o) Problem Solving; and

(p) Other math-related courses at or below the Algebra I level.

(6) This endorsement is required for teaching any subject in subsection (4) above:

(a) More than 51% of a full teaching assignment on a Basic or Standard Teaching License with an elementary endorsement issued after 1987 with the licensure code of (016); or

(b) More than 10 hours per week or if conditionally assigned in more than one subject, (See, OAR 584-036-0081) on:

(A) Any Basic or Standard Teaching License with other than an elementary endorsement; or

(B) An Initial or Continuing Teaching License with a high school authorization.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 - 342.143, 342.153, 342.165, 342.223 - 342.232
Hist.: TSPC 2-2005, f. & cert. ef. 4-15-05; TSPC 2-2008, f. & cert. ef. 4-15-08

584-065-0090

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities for Advanced Math Endorsement

(1) In addition to passing the required Commission-approved subject-matter, examinations for advanced math and completing the required practicum experience, the following requirements must be met to add an advanced math endorsement onto any Initial or Continuing Teaching License. The requirements to add an advanced math endorsement onto a Basic or Standard Teaching License can be found at: OAR 584-038-0190 and 584-040-0180.

(2) Demonstrated Content Knowledge.

(a) For knowledge of numbers, operations and algebra, candidates will:

(A) Demonstrate knowledge of the properties of the natural, integer, rational, real and complex number systems and the interrelationships of these number systems

(B) Identify and apply the basic ideas, properties and results of number theory and algebraic structures that underlie numbers and algebraic expressions, operations, equations and inequalities;

(C) Use algebraic equations to describe lines, planes and conic sections and to find distances in the plane and space;

(D) Demonstrate the use of algebra to model, analyze, and solve problems from various areas of mathematics, science and the social sciences;

(E) Apply properties and operations of matrices and techniques of analytic geometry to analyze and solve systems of equations; and

(F) Use graphing calculators, computer algebra systems, and spreadsheets to explore algebraic ideas and algebraic representations of information and to solve problems.

(b) For knowledge of geometry, candidates will:

(A) Identify and apply the basic ideas, properties and results of number theory and algebraic structures that underlie numbers and algebraic expressions, operations, equations and inequalities;

(B) Use algebraic equations to describe lines, planes and conic sections and to find distances in the plane and space;

(C) Demonstrate the use of algebra to model, analyze, and solve problems from various areas of mathematics, science and the social sciences;

(D) Apply properties and operations of matrices and techniques of analytic geometry to analyze and solve systems of equations; and

(E) Use graphing calculators, computer algebra systems, and spreadsheets to explore algebraic ideas and algebraic representations of information, and to solve problems.

(c) For knowledge of functions, candidates will:

(A) Demonstrate knowledge of the concept of a function and the most important classes of functions, including polynomial, exponential and logarithmic, rational and trigonometric;

(B) Represent functions in multiple forms, such as graphs, tables, mappings, formulas, matrices and equations;

(C) Perform a variety of operations on functions, including addition, multiplication and composition of functions, and recognize related special functions such as identities and inverses and those operations that preserve the various properties;

(D) Use functions to model situations and solve problems in calculus, linear and abstract algebra, geometry, statistics and discrete mathematics;

(E) Explore various kinds of relations, including equivalence relations, and the differences between relations and functions;

(F) Use calculator and computer technology effectively to study functions and solve problems;

(G) Demonstrate specific knowledge of trigonometric functions, including properties of their graphs, special angles, identities and inequalities, and complex and polar forms; and

(H) Use analytic representations, measures, and properties to analyze transformation of two- and three-dimensional objects.

(d) For knowledge of discrete mathematics and computer science, candidates will:

(A) Demonstrate knowledge of discrete topics including graphs, trees, networks, enumerative combinatorics and finite difference equations, iteration and recursion, and the use of tools such as functions, diagrams and matrices to explore them;

(B) Build discrete mathematical models for social decision-making;

(C) Apply discrete structures such as: sets, logic, relations and functions, and their applications in design of data structures and programming;

(D) Use recursion and combinatorics in the design and analysis of algorithms; and

(E) Candidates employ linear and computer programming to solve problems.

(e) For knowledge of probability and statistics, candidates will:

(A) Explore data using a variety of standard techniques to organize and display data and detect and use measures of central tendency and dispersion;

(B) Use surveys to estimate population characteristics and design experiments to test conjectured relationships among variables;

(C) Use theory and simulations to study probability distributions and apply them as models of real phenomena;

(D) Demonstrate knowledge of statistical inference by using probability models to draw conclusions from data and measure the uncertainty of those conclusions;

(E) Employ calculators and computers effectively in statistical explorations and practice; and

(F) Demonstrate knowledge of basic concepts of probability such as conditional probability and independence, and develop skill in calculating probabilities associated with those concepts.

(f) For knowledge of calculus, candidates will:

(A) Demonstrate conceptual understanding of and procedural facility with basic calculus concepts such as limits, derivatives and integrals of functions of one and two variables;

(B) Use concepts of calculus to analyze the behavior of functions and solve problems; and

(C) Determine the limits of sequences and series and demonstrate the convergence or divergence of series.

(3) Demonstrated Competency in Following Process Standards.

(a) For competency in problem solving, candidates will engage in mathematical inquiry through understanding a problem, exploring, recognizing patterns, conjecturing, experimenting and justifying.

(b) For competency in reasoning and proof, candidates will select and use various types of reasoning and develop and evaluate mathematical arguments and proof in all the mathematics content knowledge areas.

(c) For competency in communication, candidates will:

(A) Organize and consolidate their mathematical thinking through communication;

(B) Communicate coherently and use the language of mathematics such as symbols and terminology to express ideas precisely; and

(C) Analyze the mathematical thinking of others.

(d) For competency in representation, candidates will:

(A) Use multiple forms of representation including concrete models, pictures, diagrams, tables and graphs; and

(B) Use invented and conventional terms and symbols to communicate reasoning and solve problems.

(e) For competency in connections, candidates will:

(A) Understand how mathematical ideas interconnect and build on one another to produce a coherent whole; and

(B) Recognize and apply mathematics in contexts outside of mathematics.

(4) Demonstrated Knowledge and Skill In Mathematics Pedagogy.

(a) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in the principles of equity, candidates will demonstrate high expectations and strong support for all students to learn mathematics,

(b) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in developing curriculum, candidates will:

(A) Map curriculum that is coherent, focused on important mathematics and carefully sequenced;

(B) Be familiar with curriculum both preceding and following the high school level; and

(C) Be able to discern the quality of learning opportunities for students when given a particular task, activity, educational software, etc., and are able to make adaptations to assure quality.

(c) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in developing a quality learning environment, candidates will foster a classroom environment conducive to mathematical learning through:

(A) Providing and structuring the time necessary to explore sound mathematics and grapple with significant ideas and problems;

(B) Using the physical space and materials in ways that facilitate students' learning of mathematics;

(C) Providing a context that encourages the development of mathematical skill and proficiency; and

(D) Respecting and valuing students' ideas, ways of thinking, and mathematical dispositions.

(d) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in teaching, candidates will:

(A) Understand what mathematics students know and need to learn and then challenge and support them to learn it well; and

(B) Orchestrate discourse by:

(i) Posing questions and tasks that elicit, engage and challenge each student's thinking;

(ii) Listening carefully to students' ideas; asking students to clarify and justify their ideas orally and in writing;

(iii) Deciding what to pursue in depth from among the ideas that students bring up during a discussion;

(iv) Deciding when and how to attach mathematical notation and language to students' ideas;

(v) Deciding when to provide information, when to clarify an issue, when to model, when to lead, and when to let a student struggle with a difficulty; and

(vi) Monitoring students' participation in discussions and deciding when and how to encourage each student to participate.

(e) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in learning, candidates will:

(A) Know that students must learn mathematics with understanding, actively building new knowledge from experience and prior knowledge; and

(B) Have the ability to recognize and move students from concrete to abstract levels of understanding.

(f) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in assessment, candidates will:

(A) Use a variety of formal and informal, formative and summative assessment techniques to support the learning of important mathematics;

(B) Understand how, why and when to use various assessment techniques and tools; as well as how these tools inform their understanding about student thinking and understanding; and

(C) Plan instruction based upon the information obtained through classroom and external assessments of each student's developmental level.

(g) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in technology, candidates will:

(A) Understand that technology is an integral part of teaching and learning mathematics both influencing what is taught and enhancing how it is learned.

(B) Demonstrate effective and appropriate use of technology.

(h) For demonstrated knowledge and skill in mathematic historical development candidates will demonstrate knowledge of historical and cultural influences in mathematics including contributions of underrepresented groups.

(i) For demonstrated ability to differentiate instruction, candidates will demonstrate competencies in delivering differentiated instructional strategies that promote equitable learning opportunities and success for all students regardless of native language, socioeconomic background, ethnicity, gender, disability or other individual characteristics. Candidates will:

(A) Identify, select, and implement appropriate instruction that is sensitive to students' strengths and weaknesses, multiple needs, learning styles, and prior experiences including but not limited to cultural, ethnic, personal, family and community influences; and

(B) Use appropriate services and resources in the delivery of differentiated instruction.

(5) This endorsement is valid to teach:

(a) Advanced Algebra;

(b) Trigonometry;

(c) Pre-Calculus;

(d) Calculus;

(e) Statistics & Probability;

(f) Geometry;

(g) Survey Geometry;

(h) Trigonometry Analysis; and

(i) Other math-related courses.

(6) This endorsement is required to teach any math course above the Algebra I level.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 - 342.143, 342.153, 342.165 & 342.223 - 342.232
Hist.: TSPC 2-2005, f. & cert. ef. 4-15-05

584-065-0100 [Renumbered to 584-018-0145]

584-065-0110 [Renumbered to 584-018-0150]

584-065-0120

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities for Early Childhood Endorsement

(1) In addition to passing the required Commission-approved multiple subjects examination required for early childhood education authorization, candidates must complete the required practicum experience with students in one or more age groups or grades between age three and grade four.

(2) Teachers who hold an Initial, Initial I or Initial II or Continuing Teaching License with an elementary authorization may add the early childhood authorization level only upon enrollment in an early childhood authorization program approved by TSPC. [See, OAR 584-060-0051.]

(3) In order to promote child development and learning, the candidate must:

(a) Know and understand young children's characteristics and needs;

(b) Know and understand the multiple influences on development and learning; and

(c) Use developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive and challenging learning environments.

(4) In order to build family and community relationships, the candidate must:

(a) Know about and understand family and community characteristics;

(b) Support and empower families and communities through respectful, reciprocal relationships; and

(c) Involve families and communities in their children's development and learning.

(5) In order to document and assess the learning of young children, the candidate will:

(a) Understand the goals, benefits and uses of assessment;

(b) Know about and use observation, documentation, and other appropriate assessment tools and approaches to inform instruction;

(c) Understand and practice appropriate assessment;

(d) Develop partnerships with families and other professionals to assess children's strengths and needs; and

(e) Understand and practice appropriate assessment for all children including culturally and linguistically diverse children as well as children with exceptionalities.

(6) In order to demonstrate teaching and learning, the candidate will:

(a) Connect with children and families to create positive learning environments; and

(b) Use developmentally effective approaches:

(A) Foster oral language and communication;

(B) Draw from continuum of teaching strategies;

(C) Make the most of the environment and routines;

(D) Capitalize on incidental teaching;

(E) Focus on children's characteristics, needs, and interests;

(F) Link children's language and culture to the early childhood program;

(G) Teach through social interactions;

(H) Create support for play;

(I) Address children's challenging behaviors;

(J) Use integrative approaches to curriculum; and

(c) Demonstrate an understanding of content knowledge in early education, the candidate will create a classroom environment that encompasses the following core content objectives:

(A) In language and literacy, candidates will develop curriculum so that students will:

(i) Explore their environments and develop the conceptual, experiential, and language foundations for learning to read and write;

(ii) Develop their ability to converse at length and in depth on a topic in various settings (one-on-one with adults and peers, in small groups, etc.);

(iii) Develop vocabulary that reflects their growing knowledge of the world around them;

(iv) Use language, reading and writing to strengthen their own cultural identify as well as to participate in the shared identity of the school environment;

(v) Associate reading and writing with pleasure and enjoyment as well as with skill development;

(vi) Use a range of strategies to derive meaning from stories and texts;

(vii) Use language, reading, and writing for various purposes;

(viii) Use a variety of print and non-print resources;

(ix) Develop basic concepts of print and understanding of sounds, letters, and letter sound relationships; and

(B) In the Arts: music, creative movement, dance, drama, and art, candidates will develop curriculum so that students will:

(i) Interact musically with others;

(ii) Express and interpret understandings of their world through structured and informal musical play;

(iii) Sing, play, and create music;

(iv) Respond to expressive characteristics of music-rhythm, melody, form-through speaking, singing, moving, and playing simple instruments;

(v) Use music to express emotions, conflicts, and needs;

(vi) Move expressively to music of various tempos, meters, modes, genres, and cultures to express what they feel and hear;

(vii) Understand and apply artistic media, techniques, and processes;

(viii) Make connections between visual arts and other disciplines; and

(C) In Mathematics, candidates will develop curriculum in alignment with the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) curriculum student or K-12 grade, recognizing the quantitative dimensions of children's learning:

(i) Mathematics as problem solving;

(ii) Mathematics as communication;

(iii) Mathematics as reasoning;

(iv) Mathematical connections;

(v) Estimation;

(vi) Number sense and numeration;

(vii) Concepts of whole number operations;

(viii) Whole number computation;

(ix) Geometry and spatial sense;

(x) Measurement;

(xi) Statistics and probability;

(xii) Fractions and decimals;

(xiii) Patterns and relationships; and

(D) In physical activity and Physical Education, candidates will develop curriculum so that students will:

(i) Have varied, repeated experiences with functional movement and manipulation;

(ii) Demonstrate progress toward mature forms of selected physical skills;

(iii) Try new movement activities and skills;

(iv) Use feedback to improve performance;

(v) Experience and express pleasure from participation in physical activity;

(vi) Apply rules, procedures, and safe practices;

(vii) Gain competence to provide increased enjoyment in movement; and

(E) In Science, candidates will develop curriculum so that students will:

(i) Explore materials, objects and events by acting upon them and noticing what happens;

(ii) Make careful observations of objects, organisms, and events using all their senses;

(iii) Describe, compare, sort, classify, and order in terms of observable characteristics;

(iv) Use a variety of simple tools to extend their observations;

(v) Engage in simple investigations including making predictions, gathering and interpreting data, recognizing simple patterns, and drawing conclusions;

(vi) Record observations, explanations, and ideas through multiple forms of representation;

(vii) Work collaboratively with others, share and discuss ideas, and listen to new perspectives; and

(F) In Social Studies, candidates will develop curriculum so that students will:

(i) Geography:

(I) Make and use maps to locate themselves in space

(II) Observe the physical characteristics of the places in which they live and identify landforms, bodies of water, climate, soils, natural vegetation and animal life of that place; and

(ii) History:

(I) Use the methods of the historian, identifying questions, locating and analyzing information, and reaching conclusions;

(II) Record and discuss the changes that occur in their lives, recalling their immediate past; and

(iii) Economics:

(I) Develop awareness of the difference between wants and needs;

(II) Develop interest in the economic system, understanding the contributions of those who produce goods and services; and

(iv) Social relations/civics:

(I) Become a participating member of the group, giving up some individuality for the greater good;

(II) Recognizing similarities among people of many cultures;

(III) Respecting others, including those who differ in gender, ethnicity, ability or ideas;

(IV) Learn the principles of democracy, working cooperatively with others, sharing and voting as they solve problems; and

(d) In order to build meaningful curriculum, the candidate will:

(A) Know, understand, and use positive relationships and supportive interactions;

(B) Know, understand, and use effective approaches, strategies, and tools for early education;

(C) Know and understand the importance, central concepts, inquiry tools, curriculum integration, and structures of content areas or academic disciplines; and

(D) Know and use differentiated instructional strategies to promote equitable learning opportunities and success for all students, regardless of native language, socioeconomic background, ethnicity, gender, disability or other individual characteristics.

(7) In demonstrating professionalism, the candidate will:

(a) Identify and involve oneself with the early childhood field;

(b) Know about and uphold ethical standard and other professional guidelines (see National Association for the Education for Young Children (NAEYC) Code of Ethical Conduct);

(c) Engage in continuous, collaborative learning to inform practice;

(d) Integrate knowledgeable, reflective, and critical perspectives on early education; and

(e) Engage in informed advocacy for children and the profession.

(8) Valid for any teaching assignment, except specialization requiring endorsement under OAR 584-060-0071, at or below grade four.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 - 342.165
Hist.: TSPC 5-2008, f. & cert. ef. 6-13-08

584-065-0125

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities for World Language Endorsements

(1) Demonstrating Content Knowledge: Candidates are required to demonstrate content knowledge in one of the following ways:

(a) Passage of the Commission-approved test of world language content knowledge; or

(b) Completion of at least 45 quarter or 30 semester hours of college-level coursework in the world language subject area in language areas where the Commission has not approved a content-specific world language licensure test.

(2) Field Experience: Candidates must complete the following practicum experiences:

(a) Field experiences prior to student teaching that include experiences in world language classrooms;

(b) Field experiences, including student teaching, that are supervised by a qualified world language educator who is knowledgeable about current instructional approaches and issues in the field of world language education; and

(c) Opportunities for candidates to participate in a structured study abroad program or intensive immersion experience in a target language community.

(3) Methods requirements: Candidates must complete a methods course that deals specifically with the teaching of world languages, and that is taught by a qualified faculty member whose expertise is world language education and who is knowledgeable about current instructional approaches and issues.

(4) Technology Requirements: Candidates must demonstrate competence in technology-enhanced instruction and the use of technology in their own teaching.

(5) Language, Linguistics Comparison: Candidates must:

(a) Demonstrate a high level of proficiency in the target language, and seek opportunities to strengthen their proficiency;

(b) Know the linguistic elements of the target language system, recognize the changing nature of language, and accommodate for gaps in their own knowledge of the target language system by learning on their own; and

(c) Know the similarities and differences between the target language and other languages, identify the key differences in varieties of the target language, and seek opportunities to learn about varieties of the target language on their own.

(6) Cultures, Literatures, Cross-Disciplinary Concepts: Candidates must:

(a) Demonstrate that they understand the connections among the perspectives of a culture and its practices and products, and integrate the cultural framework for world language standards into their instructional practices;

(b) Recognize the value and role of literary and cultural texts and use them to interpret and reflect upon the perspectives of the target cultures over time; and

(c) Integrate knowledge of other disciplines into world language instruction and identify distinctive viewpoints accessible only through the target language.

(7) Language Acquisition Theories and Instructional Practices: Candidates must:

(a) Demonstrate an understanding of language acquisition at various developmental levels and use this knowledge to create a supportive classroom learning environment that includes target language input and opportunities for negotiation of meaning and meaningful interaction; and

(b) Develop a variety of instructional practices that reflect language outcomes and articulated program models and address the needs of diverse language learners.

(8) Integration of Standards into Curriculum and Instruction: Candidates must:

(a) Demonstrate an understanding of the goal areas and standards of the Standards for World Language Learning and their state standards, and integrate these frameworks into curricular planning.

(b) Integrate the Standards for World Language Learning and their state standards into language instruction.

(c) Use standards and curricular goals to evaluate, select, design, and adapt instructional resources.

(9) Assessment of Languages and Cultures: Candidates must:

(a) Believe that assessment is ongoing, and demonstrate knowledge of multiple ways of assessment that are age- and level-appropriate by implementing purposeful measures;

(b) Reflect on the results of student assessments, adjust instruction accordingly, analyze the results of assessments, and use success and failure to determine the direction of instruction; and

(c) Interpret and report the results of student performances to all stakeholders and provide opportunity for discussion.

(10) Professionalism: Candidates must:

(a) Engage in professional development opportunities that strengthen their own linguistic and cultural competence and promote reflection on practice; and

(b) Know the value of world language learning to the overall success of all students and understand that they will need to become advocates with students, colleagues, and members of the community to promote the field.

(11) This endorsement is valid to teach the following designated world languages at the grade levels authorized on the license. Other language endorsement areas may be allowed upon approval of the addition of the language by any Commission-approved teaching program.

(a) Chinese;

(b) French;

(c) German;

(d) Japanese;

(e) Latin;

(f) Russian; and

(g) Spanish.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 342
Stats. Implemented: ORS 342.120 - 342.430, 342.455 - 342.495 & 342.553
Hist.: TSPC 3-2011, f. & cert. ef. 3-15-11

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