Loading
The Oregon Administrative Rules contain OARs filed through August 15, 2014
 
QUESTIONS ABOUT THE CONTENT OR MEANING OF THIS AGENCY'S RULES?
CLICK HERE TO ACCESS RULES COORDINATOR CONTACT INFORMATION

 

BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR ENGINEERING AND LAND SURVEYING

 

DIVISION 40

THE PRACTICE OF ENGINEERING

820-040-0005

Definitions

The following definitions and guides have been adopted by the Board to assist registrants and the general public in their interpretation of specific portions of ORS 672.002 to 672.325.

(1) As used in ORS 672.060(10) and 672.107(1)(a)(B), "Ground Area" is defined as any projected or suspended occupied areas above the ground level in combination with areas in contact with the ground. Measurements in determining the ground area shall be taken from outside wall to outside wall and include the sum of the areas of all additions and the area of the original structure. The ground area of a building, or portion thereof, not provided with surrounding exterior walls is the usable area under the horizontal projection of the roof or floor above.

(2) As used in ORS 672.060(10) and 672.107(1)(a)(B), "Height" is measured from the top surface of the lowest flooring to the highest interior overhead finish of the structure in determining whether a building exceeds the 20-foot height limitation. A basement floor is considered the lowest flooring when useable (i.e., storage, garage, etc.).

(3) As used in ORS 672.107(1)(a)(D), the height of a structure is defined as the vertical dimension from the average ground level to the average roof height for sloped roofs or parapet height for flat roofs. In multi-level structures, utilize the upper roof only to determine the dimension.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 670.310, 672.060, 672.129 & 672.255
Stats. Implemented: ORS 672.002 - 672.325
Hist.: BEELS 4-2005, f. & cert. ef. 9-23-05; BEELS 1-2009, f. & cert. ef. 5-15-09

820-040-0010

Electrical Engineering

(1) "Electrical engineering" is the design of the electric power, control, and fire and life safety systems with the following electrical services:

(a) Below 250 volts, 96 Kva and above;

(b) Above 250 volts, and less than 600 volts, 150 Kva and above;

(c) Above 600 volts.

(2) Example where the services of a registered engineer may be required include the design of electrical systems for the following:

(a) Hospitals;

(b) Nursing Homes;

(c) Homes for Aged (with medical care and/or central dining facilities);

(d) Retirement Homes (with medical care and/or central dining facilities);

(e) Auditoriums (includes Concert Halls and Assembly Places for 100 or more persons);

(f) Schools;

(g) Gymnasiums;

(h) Fraternal Buildings;

(i) Structures under the purview of UBC 1807 with Oregon amendments;

(j) Multi-family Dwellings;

(k) Planned Unit Developments;

(l) Retail Stores;

(m) Office Buildings.

(3) The Board recognizes that there may be some electrical systems in the above listed structures, which are not sufficiently complex to require the services of a registered engineer. These systems may be submitted to the Board prior to issue of a building permit, and the requirement for a registered engineer may be waived.

(4) The design of electrical systems for the following structures are exempted from the requirements of subsection (1) of this rule:

(a) Duplex dwellings and structures used in connection with or auxiliary to a single-family dwelling or a duplex dwelling.

(b) Farm buildings and structures used in connection with or auxiliary to a farm building, public, commercial, industrial, or storage buildings where electric power use is limited to general purpose lighting, branch circuits not exceeding 60 amps, and the voltage not exceeding 250 volts.

(c) Any electrical contractor whose practice includes the installation and fabrication of electrical systems which he installs by virtue of a license issued under ORS 479.510 to 479.990, which requires an aggregate service capacity below that defined in subsection (1) of this rule is exempted from the requirements of subsection (1) of this rule.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 670.310 & ORS 672.255
Stats. Implemented: ORS 672.002 – 672.325
Hist.: BEELS 2-2001, f. & cert. ef. 9-14-01

820-040-0020

Structural Engineering

"Structural Engineering" means that branch of professional engineering that provides analysis, design, evaluation or review of structures or their elements, parts or systems for support of external forces such as gravity, lateral loading, temperature, seismic influence, etc.

(1) Structural engineering services for significant structures, as referred to in ORS 672.002 to 672.325, shall mean structural engineering for the primary structural frame or load resisting system and its elements or parts. The primary frame shall be that portion of the structure, which provides the overall stability of the structure. Elements, components, or parts of the structure, which are not part of the primary frame do not require the services of a professional structural engineer.

(2) A "Structural Engineer" is a registered professional engineer who passes a structural engineering examination recognized by the Board and meets the other necessary qualifications for registration under ORS 672.002 to 672.325.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 670.310 & ORS 672.255
Stats. Implemented: ORS 672.002 – 672.325
Hist.: BEELS 2-2001, f. & cert. ef. 9-14-01

820-040-0030

Traffic Engineering

(1) "Traffic Engineering" is that branch of engineering which applies technology, science, and human factors to the planning, design, operations, and management of roads, streets, bikeways, highways, their networks, terminals, and abutting lands. Its objective is to provide for the safe, rapid comfortable, economical, convenient, and environmentally compatible movement of people, goods and services. Traffic engineering embraces studies and activities in connection with roads, streets, and highway traffic controls, which include signs, signals, lighting, pavement markings, and the following:

(a) The planning, use, and design of traffic control devices and systems;

(b) The use of algorithms for the operation of traffic control system;

(c) The operational adjustment of traffic control devices and systems;

(d) The preparation of traffic engineering reports;

(e) The planning of traffic systems and networks, including environmental impacts, predictions of future needs, and interface with other modes of transportation;

(f) Traffic related engineering economic feasibility studies;

(g) The conduct of investigations and the preparation of recommendations relating to safety measures and improvements to be applied to highways including intersections, ramps, and railroad crossings;

(h) Interrelationships of highways to other travel modes and abutting lands;

(i) The operational and geometric design of roads, streets, bikeways, and highways.

(2) Functional Areas: Four areas have been identified as functional classifications within traffic engineering. Each of the functional areas is further described as follows:

(a) "Traffic operations" is the science of analysis, review, and application of traffic data systems, including accident and surveillance records, and volume and other data gathering techniques necessary for traffic planning. It includes the knowledge of operational characteristics of persons and vehicles to determine the need for installation of traffic control devices, and the treatment of the functional characteristics of the controls such as traffic signal timing. It includes the assessment of vehicular and human factors, their relationship with other traffic characteristics, the determination of safe transportation systems, and the need for inherently safe features and controls;

(b) "Traffic design" consists of the design of traffic control devices and operational design. Traffic control device design includes those activities necessary to determine the appropriate and proper application of signs, pavement markings, signals, and signal systems, as well as to determine their location, and, if necessary, construction methods. It includes the preparation of plans, specifications, and estimates for the installation or modification of the various devices. Operational design concerns the visible features of a roadway. It may be thought of as the tailoring of the highway to the terrain, to the urban landscape, and to the requirements of the roadway user. It deals with such roadway elements as cross section, curvature, sight distance, channelization, and clearances, and thus depends directly on traffic flow characteristics;

(c) "Traffic planning" includes the determination of travel pattern of persons and goods based upon engineering judgments derived from the study and analysis of traffic characteristics involving present, future, and potential land-use plans; and recommendations for transportation systems and networks of roadways. Traffic planning may include origin and destination studies; functional classification plans; travel forecasts; system, land or mode capacity studies; trip generation and distribution; modal split; traffic assignment; terminal and route location; and economic analysis. The prime responsibility of the traffic planner is to determine travel patterns and networks in concert with the several modes of transportation and their terminals;

(d) "Traffic engineering research" includes the investigation of theoretical and applied aspects of all areas of traffic engineering for the purpose of developing new knowledge, new interpretations, and new applications. Traffic research may include hypothetical testing; impact studies; development of traffic hardware; theory formulation; methods of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of existing phenomena and knowledge; and development of objectivity and thoroughness so that the validity of research findings can be demonstrated.

(3) A "Traffic Engineer" is a registered professional engineer who passes a traffic examination recognized by the Board and meets the other necessary qualifications for registration under ORS 672.002 to 672.325.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 670.310, 672.005 & 672.255
Stats. Implemented: ORS 672.002 - 672.325
Hist.: EE 2-1986, f. 3-26-86, ef. 3-31-86; BEELS 2-2001, f. & cert. ef. 9-14-01, Renumbered from 820-010-0475; BEELS 4-2005, f. & cert. ef. 9-23-05

820-040-0040

Geotechnical Engineering

(1) Geotechnical engineering is defined as the investigation and the evaluation of the physical and engineering properties of earth materials, such as soil and rock, including impacts of ground water and earthquakes, and their application to the design and construction of civil engineering works, such as foundations, earth dams, retaining walls, and similar, using soil and rock mechanics and earthquake engineering principles and related engineering laws, formula, and procedures. Further, the practice involves the application of soil and rock mechanics and related engineering laws and procedures to an evaluation of the performance of constructed civil engineering works as influenced by earth materials, groundwater, and earthquakes and to an evaluation of the performance, including stability, of natural and man-made slopes, including man-made fills and embankments, and for the design of mitigation measures to reduce risk and/or hazards as disclosed by the evaluation.

(2) A "geotechnical engineer" is a registered professional engineer recognized by the Board to practice geotechnical engineering and who meets the other necessary qualifications for registration under ORS 672.002 to 672.325.

Stat. Auth.: ORS 670.310 & 672.255
Stats. Implemented: ORS 672.002 - 672.325
Hist.: BEELS 1-2003, f. & cert. ef. 1-28-03; BEELS 1-2005, f. & cert. ef. 3-16-05; BEELS 2-2006, f. & cert. ef. 11-21-06

The official copy of an Oregon Administrative Rule is contained in the Administrative Order filed at the Archives Division, 800 Summer St. NE, Salem, Oregon 97310. Any discrepancies with the published version are satisfied in favor of the Administrative Order. The Oregon Administrative Rules and the Oregon Bulletin are copyrighted by the Oregon Secretary of State. Terms and Conditions of Use

Oregon Secretary of State • 136 State Capitol • Salem, OR 97310-0722
Phone: (503) 986-1523 • Fax: (503) 986-1616 • oregon.sos@state.or.us

© 2013 State of Oregon All Rights Reserved​