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Malheur County

The Succor Creek area. (Oregon State Archives Photo No. malD0056)

The Succor Creek area. (Oregon State Archives Photo No. malD0056)

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Contact
County Seat: 251 B St. W, Vale 97918
Phone: 541-473-5183 (General); 541-473-5171 (Court Administrator)
Fax: 541-473-5523
E-mail: ddelong@malheurco.org
Web: www.malheurco.org

 

About
Population (2011): 31,445
Established: Feb. 17, 1887
Elev. at Vale: 2,243'
Area: 9,926 sq. mi.
Average Temp.: January 28.7° July 75.6°
Assessed Value: $1,853,186,194
Real Market Value: $2,921,575,560
Annual Precipitation: 9.64"
Economy: Agriculture, livestock, food processing and recreation

 

Malheur County map

Related resources
History
Historical Records Inventory
Scenic Image
Economic Information (from OBDD)
"County Quick Facts" (from U.S. Census Bureau)
County Seat Map (from Yahoo! Maps)
County Map (from ODOT)

 

Incorporated cities
Adrian | Jordan Valley | Nyssa | Ontario | Vale

 

Points of interest
Oregon Trail, Keeney Pass, Owyhee Lake, Succor Creek State Park, Leslie Gulch Canyon, Jordan Craters, grave of trapper John Baptiste Charbonneau, Nyssa Agricultural Museum, Vale Oregon Trail Murals, Jordan Valley Basque Pelota Court, the Four Rivers Cultural Center

 

History and general information
Malheur County was created in 1887 from Baker County. Malheur County derives its name from the “Riviere au Malheur” or “Unfortunate River” (later changed to “Malheur River”), named by French trappers whose property and furs were stolen from their river encampment.

 

Malheur County is a place filled with fascinating history, diverse landscape and friendly people. The landscape is enchanting and provides for a wide variety of excellent recreation such as hunting, fishing, hiking, rock climbing, rock hounding, boating and water skiing. The county is 94 percent rangeland. Basques, primarily shepherds, settled in Jordan Valley in the 1890s. Irrigated fields in the county’s northeast corner, known as Western Treasure Valley, are the center of intensive and diversified farming.

 

County officials
Commissioners—Donald Hodge (R) 2015, Judge Dan Joyce (R) 2015, Lawrence (Larry) P. Wilson (R) 2017; Dist. Atty. Dan Norris 2017; Assess. Dave Ingram 2017; Clerk Deborah DeLong 2015; Justice of the Peace
Margaret (Margie) Mahony 2019; Sheriff Brian E. Wolfe 2017; Surv. Tom Edwards; Treas. Jennifer Forsyth 2015; Co. Admin. and CIO Lorinda DuBois

 

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