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Home > National > Oregon's Indian Tribes > Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw

Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw

Coos Bay. (Scenic photo No. cooDA0037)

Coos Bay. (Scenic photo No. cooDA0037)

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Contact
Address: 1245 Fulton Ave., Coos Bay 97420
Phone: 541-888-9577
E-mail: Bgarcia@ctclusi.org
Web: www.ctclusi.org


About
Restoration Date: October 17, 1984
Number of Members: 953
Land Base Acreage: about 415 acres
Number of people employed by the Tribes: 542


Economy
Three Rivers Casino & Hotel; Restoration Forest Plan


Points of interest
Three Rivers Casino & Hotel; Salmon Ceremony, held on the first Sunday in August at the Tribal Hall in Coos Bay; Annual Restoration Day celebrated on or about October 17 each year. The Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw observe summer and winter solstices and sponsor seasonal events for hunting and gathering.


Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Map

History and culture
Indians of western Oregon understood the land to be the Spirit expressing itself in the natural world. The people were connected to the land with certainty and gratitude. It sustained and nurtured and made life possible while supporting all the spirits which share this world. The tribal economy reflected the relationship of the Creator to the People. Acquiring objects of both aesthetic and utilitarian value was a measure of an individual’s wealth and status, yet acquisition was not an end in itself. The annual Potlatch became the setting for individuals to give their possessions to others, further mirroring the Creator’s relationship to the People. The spiritual act of gifting your earthly possessions to others remains a powerful personal experience and a statement of faith and trust.
The tribes administered laws with transparency and a focus on the collective rights of the people. Individualism at the expense of community was not tolerated. Victims of an offense participated in the forming of appropriate punishments in a public arena where justice and fairness were, like other decision making processes, a group affair.

 

By 1854, white settlers began taking Donation Land Claims around Coos Bay. In 1856, the U.S. Army forcibly removed the tribal people to the new 18,000 acre Great Coast Reservation established on a windswept spit on the north side of the mouth of the Umpqua River.


Tribal court
Tribal Judge J. D. Williams, 1245 Fulton Ave., Coos Bay 97420; 541-888-9577


Tribal council
Chief Warren A. Brainard (2020); Council: Bob Garcia (2015), Beverly Bowen (2014), Mark Ingersoll (2015), Ron Brainard (2014), Arron McNutt (2014)

 

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