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Oregon Court of Appeals > Web site

Cobra lilies at Darlingtonia State Natural Site near Florence.. (Photo courtesy Rick Hammond)

Cobra lilies at Darlingtonia State Natural Site near Florence.. (Photo courtesy Rick Hammond)

Address: Supreme Court Bldg., 1163 State St., Salem 97301-2563
Records and Case Information: 503-986-5555; Oregon Relay 771
Fax: 503-986-5865
Staff Directory from Oregon.gov


Created in 1969 as a five-judge court, the Court of Appeals was expanded to six judges in 1973 and to ten in 1977. The 2012 House Bill 4026B amended ORS 2.540 to increase the number of Court of Appeals judges from 10 to 13. The bill provides that the new positions become operative on October 1, 2013, and that they should be filled by gubernatorial appointment. The judges, otherwise elected on a state­wide, nonpartisan basis for six-year terms, must be United States citizens, members of the Oregon State Bar and qualified electors of their county of residence. The chief justice of the Supreme Court appoints a chief judge from among the judges of the Court of Appeals.


Court of Appeals judges have their offices in the Justice Building in Salem and usually hear cases in the courtroom of the Supreme Court Building. The court ordinarily sits in panels of three judges. The Supreme Court has authority to appoint a Supreme Court justice, a circuit court judge or an Oregon Tax Court judge to serve as a judge pro tempore of the Court of Appeals. The 1997 Legislature created an appellate mediation program called the Appellate Settlement Conference Program; see ORS 2.560(3).

 

Jurisdiction
The Court of Appeals has jurisdiction to review appeals of most civil and criminal cases and most state administrative agency actions. The exceptions are appeals in death penalty, lawyer and judicial disciplinary, and Oregon Tax Court cases, which go directly to the Oregon Supreme Court.

 

Reviews and Decisions
A party aggrieved by a decision of the Court of Appeals may petition the Supreme Court for review within 35 days after the Court of Appeals issues its decision. The Supreme Court determines whether to review the case. The Supreme Court allows a petition for review whenever at least one fewer than a majority of the Supreme Court judges participating vote to allow it.